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Missionary work.-American Missionary Association (Congregational), Rev. T. L. Riggs in charge, with native assistance. The Protestant Episcopal Church work is under the care of Rev. Henry Swift, and, with native assistance, both denominations support several stations and schools.

CROW CREEK AND LOWER BRULÉ AGENCY.

[Post-office address : Crow Creek Agency, Dak., via Chamberlain.]

Acres cultivated.The Indians have under cultivation 1,566 acres.

Tribes and population.—The tribes living here are the Lower Brulé and Lower Yanktonai Sioux. Population, 2,374.2

Location.—The following is the location: Crow Creek Agency, situated on the east side of the Missouri River, about 25 miles above Chamberlain, the western terminus of the Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Paul Railroad, and about 60 miles below Pierre, western terminus of Chicago and North-western Railroad, is located on a low bottom, extending some miles up and down the river, with a heavy growth of young timber between the agency and the river front.

The reservation is quite extensive, containing 630,312 acres. The land may be divided into four classes : Farming, grazing, wood, and hay lands. The farming lands constitute the larger portion of the reservation, consisting of plateau and bottom lands.

This industry is carried on among these Indians to a considerable extent. In place of the usual Indian patch of corn are seen fields of wheat, oats, and corn, with gardens and potato patches, all usually well fenced and kept in good order and tolerably well cultivated.3

Lower Brulé Agency is located upon the west bank of the Missouri River, latitude 440 porth, longitude about 23° west from Washington; its southern boundary near the White River, and extending 20 miles north to a point near Fort Hale, and extending ivest from the Missouri River a uniform width of 10 miles (as described by treaty made at Fort Sully, A. D. 1866). Much more land than this, however, is claimed by this tribe. The surface of the country is very broken, and there is but little land in the whole range of what niay be called “first-class” for cultivation; the most is only adapted for grazing purposes."

Government rations.-Sixty-seven per cent. of the Indians at Crow Creek Agency subsisted by Government rations, and 85 per cent. of the Indians at Lower Brulé Agency reported in 1886.

Mills and employés. A mill was erected in 1868; rebuilt in 1869;8 burned in 1871. Employés of the returned students from Eastern schools.

Indian police.- Established at Lower Brulé in 1878, and at Crow Creek Agency in 1878.9

Indian court of offences.-Indians decline to serve without compen. sation. 10

School population, attendance, and support.'_The school population was estimated in 1886 at 511; Crow Creek, 220; Lower Brulé, 321. The following table shows the accommodation, attendance, etc.:

Report of the Indian Commissioner, 1806, p. 4:26. 2 Ibid., p. 394. 3 Ibid., 1883, Pp. 27, 28. 4 Ibid., 1881, p. 37.

1886, p. 412. 6 Ibid., 1809, p. 313. 1871, p. 520. * Ibid., 1378, p. 36. 9 1 bia.. 1879, p. 27. 10 I bid., 1886, p. 69. 11 Ibid., p. lxxxviii.

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5 Ibid.,

7 I bid.,

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Missionary work.At Crow Creek the Protestant Episcopal Church maintains Rev. H. Burt and Rev. David Tatyopa (native) in charge. Three churches reported in 1886. Roman Catholic Church opened a mission in 1886. At Lower Brulé the Protestant Episcopal Church maintains Rev. L. C. Walker, with native catechists in charge. Five churches were reported in 1886.

CROW CREEK RESERVATION,

Hou established.-Order of Department, July 1, 1863 (see Annual Report, 1863, p. 318); treaty of April 29, 1868, Vol. XV, p. 635, and Executive order, February 27, 1885. (See President's proclamation of April 17, 1885, annulling Executive order of February 27, 1885.)

Area and survey.-Contains 203,397 acres, not reported separately.
Acres cultivated.-Not reported separately from agency.

Tribes and population.-The tribes living here are the Lower Yank. tonai, Lower Brulé, and Minnekonjo Sioux. Total population not reported separately.

Location. See Executive orders.

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Crow Creek Reserve.?

USHER'S LANDING, DAK., July 1, 1863. SIR:

With this report I transmit a plat and field-notes of the surveys made for the Sioux and Winnebago Reservations by Mr. Powers, and to which I desire to call your attention.

The reservation for the Sioux of the Mississippi is bounded as follows, to wit: Beginning at a point in the middle channel of the Missouri River, opposite the mouth of Crow Creek, in Dakota Territory ; follow up said channel of the Missouri River about 14 miles, to a point opposite the mouth of Sne-o-tka Creek ; thence due north and through the centre of the stockade surrounding the agency buildings for the Sioux of the Mississippi and Winnebago Indians, about 3 miles, to a large stone mound; thence due east 20 miles; thence due south to the Cedar Island River or American Creek; thence down the said river or creek to the middle channel of the Missouri River; thence up said channel to the place of beginning. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CLARK W. THOMPSON,

Superintendent of Indian Affairs. Hon. WILLIAM P. DOLE,

Commissioner of Indian A fairs.3

1

Report of the Indian Commissioner, 1886, p. 413. : Ibid., p. 319. 3 See Annual Report of Indian Office for 1863, p. 318, and United States Statutes at Large, Vol. XV, p. 635.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, February 27, 1885. It is hereby ordered that all that tract of country in the Territory of Dakota, known as the Old Winnebago Reservation and the Sioux or Crow Creek Reservation, and lying on the east bank of the Missouri River, set apart and reserved by Executive order dated January 11, 1875, and which is not covered by Executive order dated August 9, 1879, restoring certain of the lands reserved by the order of January 11, 1875, except the following described tracts : Townships 108 north, range 71 west, 108 north, range 72 west; fractional township 103 north, range 73 west, the west half of section 4, sections 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, and 33 of township 107 north, range 70 west ; fractional townships 107 north, range 71 west, 107 north, range 72 west, 107 north, range 73 west, the west half of township 106 north, range 70 west, and the fractional township 106 north, range 71 west; and except also all tracts within the limits of the aforesaid Old Winnebago Reservation and the Sioux or Crow Creek Reservation, which are outside the limits of the above-described tracts and which may have heretofore been allotted to the Indians residing upon said reservation, or which may have heretofore been selected or occupied by the said Indians under and in accordance with the provisions of article 6 of the treaty with the Sioux Indians of April 29, 1868, be, and the same is hereby, restored to the public domain.

CHESTER A. ARTHCR. The above order was annulled by proclamation of the President, April 17, 1885.

OLD WINNEBAGO RESERVATION.

How established.-By order of Department, July 1, 1863. By treaty of April 29, 1868. • Area and survey.-Contains 416,915 acres.

Tribes and population.--The tribes living here are the Two Kettle and Yanktonai Sioux. No statistics separately from the agency.

By order of the Indian Department of July 1, 1863, the following tracts of land were designated as reservations for the Indians :

As a reservation for the Winnebago Indians, “beginning at a point in the middle channel of the Missouri River where the western boundary of the Sioux of the Mississippi Reserve intersects the same; thence north and through the centre of the stochade surrounding the agency buildings of the Sioux of the Mississippi and Win. nebago Indians, and along said boundary line to the northwest corner of said Sioux Reserve; thence along the northern boundary of the said Sioux Reservo 10 miles; thence dne north 20 miles; thence due west to the middle channel of Medicine Knoll River; thence down said river to the middle channel of the Missouri River; thence down said channel to the place of beginning."2

Executire order.3

FEBRUARY 27, 1885, Iu is hereby ordered that all that tract of country in the Territory of Dakota, known as the Old Winnebago Reservation and the Sioux or Crow Creek Reservation, and lying on the east bank of the Missouri River, set apart and reserved by Executive order dated January 11, 1875, and which is not covered by Executive order dated August 9, 1879, restoriug certain of the lands reserved by the order of January 11, 1875, except the following-described tracts: Townships 103 north, range 71 west, 105 north, range 72 west; fractional township 108 north, range 7.3 west, the west half of section 4, sections

United States Statutes at Large, Vol. XXIII, -41; also under Old Winnebago Res. ervation above. * See Report of Commissioner of Indian Affairs, 1863, p. 318. For treaty of April 29, 1863, see page 272. 3 Report of the Indian Commissioner, 1886, p.

5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, and 33 of township 107 north, range 70 west; fractional townships 107 north, rauge 71 west; 107 north, range 72 west; 107 north, range 73 west; the west half of township 106 porth, range 70 west, apd the fractional township 106 north, range 71 west; and except also all tracts within the limits of the aforesaid Old Winnebago Reservation and the Sioux or Crow Creek Reservation, which are outside the limits of the above-described tracts and which may have here. tofore been allotted to the Indians residing upon said reservation, or which may have heretofore been selected or occupied by the said Indians under and in accordance with the provisions of article 6 of the treaty with the Sioux Indians of April 29, 1868, be, and the same is hereby, restored to the public domain.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION:

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Whereas by an Executive order bearing date the 27th day of February, 1885, it was ordered that “all that tract of country in the Territory of Dakota known as the Old Winnebago Reservation, and the Sioux or Crow Creek Reservation, and lying on the east bank of the Missouri River, set apart and reserved by Executive order dated January 11, 1875, and which is not covered by the Executive order dated August 9, 1879, restoring certain of the lands reserved by the order of January 11, 1875, except the following described tracts: Townships number 108 north, range 71 west; 108 north, range 72 west ; fractional township 108 north, range 73 west; the west half of section 4, sections 5,6,7,8,9, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, and 33 of township 107 north, range 70 west, fractional townships 107 north, range 71 west, 107 north, range 72 west, 107 north, range 73 west, the west half of township 106 north, range 70 west, and fractional township 106 north, range 71 west; and except, also, all tracts within the limits of the aforesaid Old Winnebago Reservation and the Sioux or Crow Creek Reservation which are outside of the limits of the above described tracts, and which may have heretofore been allotted to the Indians residing upon said reservation, or which may have heretofore been selected or occupied by the said Indians under and in accordance with the provisions of article 6 of the treaty with the Sioux Indians of April 29, 1863, be, and the same is liereby, restored to the public domain ;'"

And whereas, npon the claim being made that said order is illegal and in violation of the plighted faith and obligations of the United States contained in sundry treaties heretofore entered into with the Indian tribes or bands, occupants of said reservation; and that the further execution of said order will not only occasion much distress and sufferivg to peaceable Indians, but retard the work of their civilization and engender amongst them a distrust of the National Government, I have determined, after a careful examination of the several treaties, acts of Congress, and other official data bearing on the subject, aided and assisted therein by the advice and opinion of the Attorney-General of the United States duly rendered in that behalf, that the lands so proposed to be restored to the public domain by said Executive order of February 27, 1885, are included as existing Indian reservations on the east bank of the Missouri River by the terms of the second article of the treaty with the Sioux Indians concluded April 29, 1868, and that consequently being treaty reservations, the Executive was without lawful power to restore them to the public domain by .said executive order, which is therefore deemed and considered to be wholly inoperative and void;

And whereas the laws of the United States provide for the removal of all persons residing or being found upon Indian lands and territory without permission expressly and legally obtained of the Interior Department:

Now, therefore, in order to maintain inviolate the solemn pledges and plighted faith of the Government as given in the treaties in question and for the purpose of properly protecting the interests of the Indian tribes as well as of the United States

in the premises, and to the end that no person or persons may be induced to enter upon said lands where they will not be allowed to remain without the permission of the authority aforesaid, 1, Grover Cleveland, President of the United States, do hereby declare and proclaim the said Executive order of February 27, 1885, to be in contravention of the treaty obligations of the United States with the Sionx tribe of Indians and therefore to be inoperative and of no effect; and I further declare that the lands intended to be embraced therein are existing Indian reservations and as such available for Indian purposes above and subject to the Indian intercourse acts of the United States. I do further warn and admonish all and every person or persons now in the occupation of said lands under color of said Executive order, and all such person or persons as are intending or preparing to enter and settle upon the same thereunder, that they will neither be permitted to remain nor enter upon said lands, and such persons as are already there are hereby required to vacate and remove therefrom with their effects within sixty days from the date hereof; and in case a due regard for and voluntary obedience to the laws and treaties of the United States and this adınonition and warning be not sufficient to effect the purpose and intentions as herein declared, all the power of the Government will be employed to carry into proper execution the treaties and laws of the United States herein referred to.

In testimony whereof I hereunto set my hand and cause the seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington this seventeenth day of April, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-five, and of the indepeudence of the United States of America the one hundred and ninth.1 [SEAL)

GROVER CLEVELAND. By the President:

T. F. BAYARD,

Secretary of State.

PINE RIDGE AGENCY.

[Post-office address : Pine Ridge Agency, Dak.]

Acres cultivated.-The Indians have under cultivation 1,516 acres.

Tribes and population. The tribes living here are the Northern Chey. enne and Ogalalla Sioux. Population, 4,873.3

Location.—“Situated on White Clay Creek, a branch of White Earth River."

This creek is a bold-running stream, of good fresh water, rising in the pine ridge which runs parallel to the northern boun. dary of Nebraska, and nearly due north 25 miles into the main White Earth River.” 5

Government rations.-Seventy per cent. of these Indians subsisted by Government rations in 1886.

Mills and Indian employés.-A mill built at White River in 1874, and one at Pine Ridge in 1873.8

Indian police.-Organized in 1874. In 1881 an agent writes : “ There has been constructed at the agency one building for the use of the po. lice, containing mess-room, kitchen, and dormitory. Here the police and Indian laborers are furnished their meals three times a day at reg. ular hours; this arrangement is civilizing in its effect, teachiug them

See United States Statutes, Vol. XXIII, pp. 844–846. o Report of the Indian Commissioner, 1886, 426. 3 Ibid., p. 396. * Ibid., 1887, p. 37. 6 Ibid., p. 157. .6 I bid., 1886, p. 414. 7 Ibid., 1874 p. 46. 8 I bid., 1879, p. 40. Ibid., 1874, p. 46.

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