Page images
PDF
EPUB

bow to conduct themselves at table, and the benefit of properly-prepared food.” 1

Indian court of offences.-Indians unwilling to serve without pay.

School population, attendance, and support.”—The school population as estimated in 1886 was 1,800. The following table shows the accommodation, attendance, etc:

[blocks in formation]

Missionary work.- Protestant Episcopal Church missions, under the charge of Rer. John Robinson assisted by Rev. Isaac Cook and Rev. Amos Ross (natives), and native catechists. Two churches and several mission stations reported. The Presbyterians and Roman Catholics have started missions recently.3

ROSEBUD AGENCY.

[Post-office address: Rosebud Agency, Dak., via Valentine, Nebr.)

Acres cultivated.-The Indians have under cultivation 4,199 acres.*

Tribes and population.— The tribes living here are the Minnekonjo, Ogalalla, Upper Bruló, and Wahzahzah Sioux. Population, 8,291.5

Location.-" This agency is located K miles from the Missouri River, on the western bank of the Rosebud, nearly 3 miles above its confluence with the White River, and is surrounded with high hills, which render it difficult of access." This agency has control of an area of 65 by 200 square miles.

Government rations.—Seventy per cent. of the Indians subsisted by Government rations.

Mills and Indian employés.-A mill was built on White River at Rose. bad Agency, 1878, but being built where a supply of water was impossible to obtain, it was useless until removed to the bank of the stream.' Indian police.-Established in 1878.16 Indian court of offences.- None reported. "Report of the Indian Commissioner, 1881, p.50. 2 Ibid., 1886, p. xc. 3 Ibid., pp. 77, 415. * I bid., p. 428. 6 Ibid., p. 396. 6 Ibid., 1884, p. 41; 1886, p. 78. : Ibid., 1875, p. 254. Ibid., 1878, p. 38. Ibid., 1880, p. 43. 10 Ibid., 1878,

8

School population, attendance, and support. The school population as estimated in 1886 was 1,700. The following table shows the accom. modation, attendance, etc.:

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Missionary work.--The Protestant Episcopal Church has missions here under the charge of Rev. William J. Cleveland, assisted by the Rev. Charles S. Cook (native) and native deacons and catechists. Seven church buildings were reported in 1886. In that year the Roman Catholics began a mission.2

STANDING ROCK AGENCY.

[Post-office address: Standing Rock Agency, Fort Yates, Dak.] Acres cultivated.—The Indians have under cultivation 3,350 acres.

Tribes and population.—The tribes living here are the Blackfeet, Unkpapa, Lower and Upper Yanktonai Sioux. Population, 4,690.4

Location.—The following is the location :

Standing Rock Agency is located upon the west bank of the Missouri River, in latitude 46° 10' north. The Indian settlements extend along the Missouri, from the Cannon Ball River on the north to the Grand River on the south, a distance of about 60 miles; whilst the agency buildings are situated nearly midway between these two streams, the Cannon Ball River being the northern boundary of the reservation, and the Missouri River the eastern line. The Indians of this agency therefore occupy the north-eastern corner of the reservation, which, for agricultural and grazing purposes combined, I believe to be by far the best portion of the “Great Sioux Reservation," so called.5

Government rations.-Seventy per cent. of these Indians subsisted by Government rations in 1886.6

Mills and employés.- None reported. "Report of the Indian Commissioner, 1886, p. xc. ? Ibid., pp. 82-85, 415. 3 Ibid.,

Ibid., p. 396. Ibid., 1882, p. 43. * Ibid., 1886, p. 414.

6

p. 428.

Indian police.- Organized in 1878.1
Indian court of offences.- Established in 1883.2

School population, attendance, and support.3—The school population as estimated in 1886 was 1,109. The following table shows the accom. modation, attendance, etc.:

[blocks in formation]

Missionary work.-- The Roman Catholic Church has here four mission stations. The American Missionary Association (Congregational) has a station at Grand River. The Protestant Episcopal Church has a station at Oak Creek. These last are under the charge of natives.

SYNOPSIS OF SIOUX TREATIES.

Treaty of September 23, 1803, with the Sioux Indians, made by Lieut. 2. M. Pike. The Indians cede for military posts 9 miles square at the mouth of the river St. Croix; and at the confluence of the Mississippi and St. Peter's Rivers. to include the falls of St. Anthony, 9 miles on each side of the Mississippi. (Art. 1.)

The United States to pay $2,000 or to deliver the same value in goods and mercbandise. (Art. 2.)

Indians to be allowed to hunt and traverse the districts ceded. (Art. 3.)
Approved by the Senate April 13, 1808. (Indian Laws, p. 316.)
Treaty of peace made at Portage des Sioux with the Sioux of the Lakes, July 19, 1815.
Injuries to be mutually forgiven. (Art. 1.)
Perpetual peace to be maintained. (Art. 2.)
The protection of the United States acknowledged. (Art. 3.)
Ratified December 26, 1815. (United States Statutes at Large, Vol. VII, p. 126.)

A similar treaty was made on the same date (July 19, 1815), and at the same place, with the Teton band of Sioux. (See United States Statutes at Large, Vol. VII, p. 125.)

A similar treaty was made on the saine date (July 19, 1815), same place, with the Sioux of the St. Peter's. (See United States Statutes at Large, Vol. VII, p. 127.)

A treaty with the eight bands of the Sioux, composing the three tribes called the Sioux of the Leaf, the Sioux of the Broad Leaf, and the Sioux who Shoot in the Pine Tops, was made at St. Lonis, June 1, 1816, of the same import as the preceding, except that these bands agree to confirm to the United States all cessions hitherto made by them to the British, French, or Spanish Governments within the limits of the United States. (Art. 3.)

Proclaimed December 30, 1816. (United States Statutes at Large, Vol. VII, p. 143.) Report of the Indian Commissioner, 1879, r. 47. ? I bid., 1883, p. 56.

3 I bid.,

1886, p. XC.

Treaty veturen the Teton, Yancton, and Yanctonie bands of Sioux Indians, made at Fort

Lookout, June 22, 1825. The Indians acknowledge dependence upon the United States and the right of the latter to regulate traile. (Arts, 1, 3.)

United States to extend benefits to Indians. (Art. 2.)

Indians to protect traders and surrender any person not legally authorized by the United States to trade. Safe conduct to all persons legally authorized to pass tbrough their country. To deliver up offenders to the laws of the United States and to assist in the restoration of stolen property. The United States, upon proof, to indemnify the Indians for property stolen by citizens. (Art. 5.)

Indians not to supply implements of war to hostile tribes. (Art. 6.)
Proclaimed February 6, 1826. (United States Statutes at Large, Vol. VII, p. 250.)

Treaty with the Sioune and Ogalalla tribes of Sioux Indians, made at the mouth of the

Teton River, July 5, 1825.

Similar to the preceding treaty. Statutes at Large, Vol. VII, p. 232.)

Proclaimed February 6, 1826.

(United States

Treaty with the Hunkpapa band of Sioux Indians, made at the Auricara rillage, July

16, 1825.

Proclaimed February 6, 1826.

(United States

Similar to the preceding treaty. Statutes at Large, Vol. VII, p. 257.)

Treaty with the Siour and Chippewa, Sac and Fox, Menominie, Ioway, Sioux, Minnebago,

and a portion of the Oltawa, Chippewa, and Potawattomie Indians, made at Prairie des Chiens, Michigan Territory, August 19, 1825.

Peace established between the Sioux and the Chippewas, the confederated tribes of Sacs and Foxes, and the Ioways. (Art. 1.)

The line between the confederated tribes of the Sacs and Foxes and the Sioux sball be as follows: From the mouth of the Upper Ioway River, on the west bank of the Mississippi, iind ascending the said Ioway River to its left fork; thence to its source; thence crossing the fork of Red Cedar River in a direct line to the second or upper fork of the Des Moines River; and thence in a direct line to the lower fork of the Calumet River; and down that river to its juncture with the Missouri River, subject to the assent of the Yankton to the line from the Des Moines to the Missouri. Sac and Fox relinquish to the tribes interested all their claims to the land east of the Mississippi. (Art. 2.)

The Ioways accede to this agreement, they having a just claim to a portion of the country described; they to reside peaceably therein with Sac and Fox. (Art. 3.)

The Otoes not being represented their claim to the land is not affected. (Art. 4.)

The line dividing the respective countries of the Sioux and Chippewas begins at the Chippewa River, balf a day's march below the falls;

thence to Red Cedar River immediately below the falls; thence to the St. Croix River, at a place called the standing cedar, about a day's paddle in a canoe above the lako at the mouth of that river; thence

between two lakes called by the Chippewas “Green Lakes,” and by the Sioux “the lakes they bury the eagles in,” and thence to the standing cedar that “the Sioux split;" thence to Rum River, crossing it at the mouth of

Choaking Creek, a long day's march from the Mississippi; thence to a point of woods that projects into the prairie, half a day's march from the Mississippi; thence in a straight line to the month of the first river which enters the Mississippi on its west side above the mouth of Sac River; thence ascending the said ri ver (above the mouth of Sac River) to a small lake at its source; thence in a direct line to a lake at the head of Prairie River, which is supposed to enter the Crow

[ocr errors]

Wing River on its south side; thence to Otter-tail Lake Portage; thence to said Otter-tail Lake, and down through the middle thereof to its outlet; thence in a direct line so as to strike Buffalo River half way from its source to its mouth, and down the said river to Red River; thence descending Red River to the month of Outard or Goose Creek. The eastern boundary of the Sioux commerces opposite the mouth of loway River, on the Mississippi, runs back 2 or 3 miles to the bluffs, follows the bluff's crossing Bad Axe River to the mouth of Black River, and from Black River to half av day's march below the falls of the Chippewa River. (Art.5.)

It is agreed, so far as the Chippewas and Winnebagoes are mutually interested therein, that the southern boundary line of the Chippewa conntry shall commence on the Chippewa River aforesaid, half a day's march below the falls of that river, and run thence to the source of Clear Water River (a branch of the Chippewa); thence south to Black River; thence to a point where the woods project into the meadows, and thence to the Plover Portage of the Quisconsin. (Art. 6.)

It is agreed between the Winnebagoes and the Sioux, Sacs and Foxes, Chippewas and Ottawas, Chippewas and Potawatomies of tho Illinois, that the Winnebago country shall be bounded as follows: South-easterly by Rock River from its source, near the Winnebago Lake to the Winnebago village, about 40 miles above its mouth; westerly by the east line of the tract, lying upon the Mississippi herein secured to the Ottawa, Chippewa, and Potawatomie Indians of the Illinois; and also by the high bluff described in the Sioux boundary and running north to Black River; from this point the Winnebagoes claim up Black River to a point due west from the source of the left fork of the Quisconsin; tbence to the source of the said fork and down the same to the Ouisconsin; thence down the Ouisconsin to the portage, and across the portage to Fox River; thence down Fox River to the Winnebago Lake and to the grand Kan Kanlin, including in their claim the whole of Winnebago Lake; but, for the causes stated in the next article, this line from Black River must for the present be left indeterminate. (Art. 7.)

The rights of the Menominies, they being absent, shall not be affected, their land being bounded on the north by the Chippewa country, on the East by Green Bay and Lake Michigan, extending as far south as Milwaukee River, and on the west they claim to Black River. (Art. 8.)

The country secured to the Ottawa, Chippewa, and Potawatomie tribes of the Illinois is bounded as follows: Beginning at the Winnebago village on Rock River, 40 miles from its mouth, and running thence down the Rock River to a line wbich runs from Lake Michigan to the Mississippi, and with that line to the Mississippi opposite Rock Island; thence up that river to the United States Reservation at the mouth of the Quisconsin; thence with the south and east lines of the said reservation to the Quisconsin; thence southerly, passing the heads of the small streams emptying into the Mississippi, to the Rock River at the Winnebago village. The Illinois Indians have also a just claim to a portion of the country bounded south by the Indian boundary line aforesaid, running from the southern extreme of Lake Michigan, east by Lako Michigan, north by the Menominie country, and northwest by Rock River. This claim is recognized in the treaty concluded with the said Illinois tribes at St. Louis, August 24, 1816. (Art. 9.)

All the tribes acknowledge dependence upon the United States, and make no claim to the reservations at Fever River, Ouisconsin, St. Peter's, Prairie des Chiens, and Green Bay, and the half-breed reservations on the Mississippi, marie August 4, 1824. (See treaty Sac and Fox, made at Washington, August 4, 1824.) (Art. 10.)

President to hold a council with Yankton and Otoe in 1826 to adjust unsettled lincs (Art. 11), and with Chippewas in the same year on Lake Superior. (Art. 12.)

No tribe to bunt within the acknowledged limits of any other tribe without its consent. (Art. 13.)

Tribes to settle difficulties amicably. United States to take such measures as it deems proper to effect same objects. (Art. 14.)

« PreviousContinue »