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Treaty obligation on tribes from its date; on the United States after ratification. (Art. 15.)

Proclaimed February 6, 1826. (United States Statutes at Large, Vol. VII, p. 272.) Treaty with the confederated tribes of the Sacs and Foxes; the Medawah-Kanton, Wahpacoota, Wahpeton, and Sissetong bands of Sioux; the Omahas, Ioways, Ottoes, and Missourias, made at Prairie du Chien, Michigan Territory, July 15, 1830.

The said tribes cede to the United States their lands within the following boundaries: Beginning at the upper fork of the Demoine River, and passing the sources of the Little Sioux and Floyds Rivers to the fork of the first creek which falls into the Big Sioux or Calumet on the east side; thence down said creek and Calumet River to the Missouri River; thence down said Missouri River to the Missouri State line above the Kansas; thence along said line to the north-west corner of said State; thence to the highlands between the waters falling into the Missouri and Demoine, passing to said highlands along the dividing ridge between the forks of the Grand River; thence along said highlands or ridge separating the waters of the Missouri from those of the Demoine to a point opposite the source of Boyer River, and thence in a direct line to the upper fork of the Demoine, the place of beginning. But it is understood that the lands ceded and relinquished by this treaty are to be assigned and alloted under the direction of the President of the United States, to the tribes now living thereon, or to such other tribes as the President may locate thereon for hunting and other purposes. (Art. 1.)

The confederated tribes of the Sacs and Foxes cede to the United States a tract 20 miles in width, from the Mississippi to the Demoine; situate south and adjoining the line between the said confederated tribes of Sacs and Foxes, and the Sioux, as established by the second article of the treaty of Prairie du Chien, of August 19, 1825. (Art. 2.)

The Medawah-Kanton, Wah-pa-coota, Wahpeton, and Sisseton bands of the Sioux cede to the United States a tract of country 20 miles in width, from the Mississippi to the Demoine River, situate north, and adjoining the line mentioned in the preceding article. (Art. 3.)

The claim or right in common of the tribes to this treaty to any lands not embraced in these cessions shall not be affected. (Art. 12.)

The United States to pay to the Sacs $3,000; to the Foxes $3,000; to the Sioux of the Mississippi $2,000; to the Yancton and Santie bands of the Sioux $3,000; to the Omahas $2,500; to the Ioways $2,500; to the Ottoes and Missourias $2,500, and to the Sacs of the Missouri River $500, to be paid annually for ten years in money, merchandise, or domestic animals, at their option; also to maintain for ten years one blacksmith and agricultural implements as stipulated for each of the foregoing bands. (Art. 4.)

Also a gift of $5,132 worth of merchandise which shall be considered as full compensation for the cession made. (Art. 8.)

The United States to set apart $3,000 annually for ten years, to be applied, at the discretion of the President, to the education of the children of said tribes. (Art. 5.)

The United States to set apart the following reservation for half-breed Sioux: Beginning at a place called the barn, below and near the village of the Red Wing Chief, and running back 15 miles; thence in a parallel line with Lake Pepin and the Mississippi about 32 miles to a point opposite Beef or O-Boef River; thence 15 miles to the Grand Encampment opposite to the river aforesaid. The half-breeds' title to be the same as other Indian titles. (Art. 9.)

The following reservation for the Omaha, Ioway, Ottoe, Yancton, and Santie halfbreeds: Beginning at the mouth of the Little Ne-mohaw River and running up the main channel of said river to a point which will be 10 miles from its mouth in a direct line; from thence in a direct line to strike the Grand Ne-mohaw 10 miles above its mouth in a direct line (the distance between the two Ne-mohaws being about 20

miles); thence down said river to its mouth; thence up and with the meanders of the Missouri River to the point of beginning. Half-breeds of said tribes and bands may occupy said tract in the same manner as other Indians. The President may hereafter assign to any of the said half-breeds, to be held in fee-simple, any portion of said tract not exceeding 640 acres to each individual. And this provision shall extend to the cession made by the Sioux in the preceding article. (Art. 10.)

The reservation mentioned in the preceding article having belonged to the Ottoes and been ceded by them, it is agreed that the Omahas, the Ioways, and the Yancton and Santie bands of Sioux shall pay out of their annuities to the said Ottoe tribe for the period of ten years $100 each, making $300 annually. (Art. 11.)

Treaty to take effect after ratification. (Art. 13.)

Proclaimed February 24, 1831. (United States Statutes at Large, Vol. VII, pp. 328-332.)

Treaty with the band of Sioux under Wahashaw, September 10, 1836.

The Indians cede all that portion of territory lying between the State of Missouri and the Missouri River included in the land to be assigned and allotted according to article 1 of the treaty of July 15, 1830, receiving as payment presents to the amount of $400 in goods or money.

Proclaimed February 15, 1837. (United States Statutes at Large, Vol. VII, p. 510.) Treaty with the Ottoes, Missouries, Omahaws, and Yankton and Santee bunds of Sioux, made at Bellevue, Upper Missouri, October 15, 1836.

The Indians relinquish all claim to that portion of the land set apart in article 1, of the treaty of July 15, 1830, lying between the State of Missouri and the Missouri River. (Art. 1.)

The United States to give presents to the Ottoes, $1,250; to the Missouries, $1,000; to the Omahaws, $1,270; to the Yankton and Santee bands, $1,000. (Art. 2.)

The Ottoes and Missouries having removed to a place selected for them, the United States to furnish 500 bushels of corn; and the Omahaws having established themselves at the place recommended to them, the United States to break and fence 100 acres of ground as soon as it can be done after ratification of this treaty. (Art. 3.)

Treaty obligatory on tribes from date, upon the United States after ratification. Proclaimed February 15, 1837. (United States Statutes at Large, Vol. VII, pp. 524-526.)

Treaty with the Wahpaakootah, Susseton, and Upper Medawakanton bands of Sioux Indians, made at St. Peters, November 30, 1836.

Indians agree to the cession of the land lying between the State of Missouri and the Missouri River.

United States agrees to pay $550 in goods.

Proclaimed February 18, 1837. (United States Statutes at Large, Vol. VII, p. 527.) Treaty with certain braves and chiefs of the Sioux Nation, made at Washington, September 29, 1837.

Cede their lands east of the Mississippi River and all their islands in said river. (Art. 1.)

The sum of $300,000 shall be invested at 5 per cent., the interest to be paid annually forever; one-third to be applied as the President may direct, and the residue to be paid in specie or in such other manner as the tribe may designate; $110,000 to be distributed as determined by the chiefs signing treaty and the War Department, no mixed bloods less than quarter breeds to be included in this benefit; $90,000 for the payment of the just debts of the Sioux Indians; to the chiefs and braves an annuity for

twenty years of $10,000 in goods; to expend annually for twenty years $8,250 for medicine, agricultural implements and stock, support of physician, farmer, and blacksmith; to enable the Indians to improve their lands, and purchase agricultural implements, tools, cattle, and other useful articles, an amount not exceeding $10,000 allowed. For twenty years the sum of $5,500 annually shall be expended in the purchase of provisions. The chiefs and braves signing this treaty shall receive $6,000 in goods. (Art. 2.)

Treaty binding when ratified.

Proclaimed June 15, 1838. (United States Statutes at Large, Vol. VII, p. 538.)

Treaty with the See-see-toan and Wah-pay-toan bands of Sioux Indians, made at Traverse des Sioux, Minnesota, July 23, 1851.

Peace shall be perpetual. (Art. 1.)

The Indians cede their land in the State of Iowa, and also in the Territory of Minnesota lying east of the following line: Beginning at the junction of the Buffalo River with the Red River of the North; thence along the western bank of said Red River of the North to the mouth of the Sioux Wood River; thence along the western bank of said river to Lake Traverse; thence along the western shore of said lake to the southern extremity thereof; thence in a direct line to the junction of Kampeska Lake with the Tchan-kas-an-data or Sioux River; thence along the western bank of said river to its point of intersection with the northern line of the State of Iowa, including all the islands in said rivers and lake. (Art. 2.)

The sum of $1,665,000, in the following manner: To the chiefs, $275,000, out of which the chiefs agree to remove to their reservations and subsist themselves one year without further cost to the Government; $30,000 to be expended under the direction of the President for the establishment of a manual labor school, mills, blacksmith shop, opening farms, etc.; the balance, $1,360,000, to remain in trust, at 5 per cent., interest to be paid annually, for a period of fifty years, commencing July, 1852, which shall be in full payment of said balance, principal and interest, the said payment to be applied, under the direction of the President, as follows: $12,000 for a general agricultural and civilization fund, $6,000 for education, $10,000 for goods and provisions, and $40,000 money annuity. (Art. 4.)

All that tract of country on either side of the Minnesota River, from the western boundary of the lands herein ceded, east to the Tchay-tam-bay River on the north, and to Yellow Medicine River on the south, to extend on each side a distance of not less than 10 miles from the general course of said river. (Art. 3.)

The United States to pay at the rate of 10 cents an acre for the above lands, which had been set apart as a reservation for these Indians.

The President is authorized, with the assent of the Indians, to set apart by appropriate landmarks and boundaries such tracts of country without the limits of the cession herein made as may be satisfactory for future occupation of these Indians. The President may, by the consent of the Indians, vary the conditions aforesaid if deemed expedient. (Senate amendment to Art. 3.)

The sale of liquor is forbidden in the Indian country. The rules and regulations to protect the personal property of the Indians to be prescribed and enforced as the President or Congress may direct. (Art. 5.)

Treaty amended June 23, 1852; assented to by Indians September 8, 1852; proclaimed February 24, 1853. (United States Statutes at Large, Vol. X, pp. 949-953.)

Treaty with the Medaywakantoan and Wahpaykootay bands of Sioux Indians, made at Mendota, Minnesota, August 5, 1851.

Peace shall be perpetual. (Art. 1.)

Indians cede all their lands in the Territory of Minnesota or the State of Iowa. (Art. 2.)

The United States to pay $1,410,000 in the following manner: Two hundred and twenty thousand dollars to the chiefs to remove and sustain themselves for one year without cost to the Government, this sum to be divided in equal parts between the two bands; $30,000, under the direction of the President, for manual-labor school, mills, shops, opening farms, etc.; the balance, $1,160,000, to remain in trust, at the rate of 5 per cent. interest, to be paid annually, for a period of fifty years, commenc ing July, 1852, which shall be in full payment of said balance, principal, and interest, to be applied, under the direction of the President, as follows: Twelve thousand dollars for a general agricultural and civilization fund; $5,000 for education; $10,000 for the purchase of goods and provisions; $30,000 as a money annuity.

The entire annuity provided for in the second article of the treaty of 1837 (United States Statutes at Large, Vol. VII, p. 539), including any unexpended balance that may be in the Treasury on the 1st of July, 1852, shall thereafter be paid in money.

Following reservation set apart, tract of country of the average width of 10 miles on either side of the Minnesota River, and bounded on the west by the Tchay-tambay and Yellow Medicine Rivers, and on the east by Little Rock River and a line running due south from its mouth to the Waraju River, the boundaries of said tract to be marked out by as straight lines as practicable, whenever and in such manner as the President of the United States shall direct (United States Statutes at Large, Vol. X, p. 957), United States to pay for the above lands 10 cents per acre in lieu of reservation. (Senate amendment to Art. 3, preceding treaty.)

Amended June 23, 1852; assented to September 8, 1852; proclaimed February 24, 1853. (United States Statutes at Large, Vol. X, pp. 954-959.)

Treaty between Sioux and other tribes, made at Fort Laramie, Wyo., September 17, 1851. (Indian Laws, p. 317.)

See Blackfoot treaties, Montana.

Treaty with the Mendawakanton and Wahpakoota tribes of Sioux Indians made at Washington, June 19, 1858.

Whereas it was agreed that the land described in the third article of the treaty of August 5, 1851, was to be purchased by the United States. Said land having been set apart for the future occupancy and home of these Indians, the President so far varied the conditions as to permit these said bands to locate for the time being upon the tract originally reserved; and whereas, no other home having been provided for them, Congress, by act of July 31, 1854, authorized the President to confirm to these bands forever their reservation on the Minnesota River now occupied by them. (Art. 2.)

It is agreed that that part of the tract of land described in article 3 of the treaty of August 5, 1851, of the Minnesota River, shall constitute a reservation for said bands, and shall be surveyed. Eighty acres shall be allotted to the head of each family, or single person over the age of twenty-one years, and to children upon arriving at majority. Each allotment shall include a proper portion of timber land, the residue of the reservation to be held in common. The President, at his discretion, may cause patents to be issued, which shall be inalienable except to the United States. Tracts exempt from levy, taxation, or forfeiture until otherwise provided. The expenses of survey and allotment to be paid out of the funds of said bands. (Art. 1.)

And whereas the President has not directly so confirmed said reserve, the question shall be submitted to the Senate whether these bands have a right to said lands, and if so, what compensation shall be made for that part of said reservation lying north of the Minnesota River. (Art. 2.)

If the Senate shall assent to compensation, a sum not exceeding $70,000, from the proceeds of sale, shall be used to cancel the just debts and obligations of the bands. (Art. 3.)

All laws regulating trade and intercourse with Indian tribes shall be enforced over the reservation, and shall protect from trespass not only the timber land allotted to individuals, but that reserved for subsequent use. (Art. 4.)

The United States shall have the right to establish military posts, agencies, schools, mills, shops, roads, and other improvements, as may be deemed necessary. Compensation shall be made to the Indians for any injury arising therefrom. Roads or highways authorized by competent authority other than the United States shall have right of way upon pay ment of a fair value of the land taken. (Art. 5.)

The bands acknowledge their dependence on the United States and bind themselves to friendly relations, to make compensation for injuries done, and to deliver up offenders to punishment. (Art. 6.)

Annuities to be withheld from those using intoxicating liquors. (Art. 7.)

Stipulations in former treaties providing for the payment of particular sums of money or for the application thereof are hereby so amended and changed as to invest the Secretary of the Interior with discretionary power in regard to the objects of annual expenditure of all sums which have accrued and are now due to said bands, together with that which shall become due, provided said sums shall be expended for the benefit of said bands as the Secretary shall deem best. (Art. 8.) Senate decide on claim of A. J. Campbell. (Art. 9.) United States pay expenses of treaty. (Art. 11.) Proclaimed March 31, 1859. Treaty with the Sisseton and

(United States Statutes at Large, Vol. XII, p. 1031.)

Wahpaton bands of Sioux Indians, made at Washington,
June 19, 1858.

The stipulations and agreements of articles 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, of this treaty are identical with those of the preceding treaty of June 19 with the Mendawakanton and Wahpakoota bands.

Article 8 provides as follows: "Any members of said Sisseton and Wahpaton bands who may be desirous of dissolving their tribal connection and obligations, and of locating beyond the limits of the reservation provided for said bands, shall have the privilege of so doing by notifying the United States agent of such intention, and making an actual settlement beyond the limits of said reservation; shall be vested with all the rights, privileges and immunities, and be subject to all the laws, obligations and duties of citizens of the United States; but such procedure shall work no forfeiture on their part of the right to share in the aunuities of said bands.

Articles 9 and 10 identical with articles 8 and 10 of preceding treaty.

Proclaimed March 31, 1859. (United States Statutes at Large, Vol. XII, p. 1037.) By an act of Congress of June 27, 1860, the Senate decided that the Mendawakanton and Wahpakoota and Sisseton and Wahpaton bands possessed a just and valid right and title to the reservation, and that they be allowed the sum of 30 cents per acre for the lands lying north of the Minnesota River, exclusive of the cost of survey and sale or contingent expenses; and also that all persons who had settled in good faith and made improvements on lands contained in the reservation, believing them to be Gov. ernment lands, shall have the right of pre-emption to 160 acres, paying the sum of $1.25 per acre. For such settlements on the south side of the Minnesota River the consent of the Indians shall first be obtained in such manner as the Secretary of the Interior may prescribe. The money for the sale to be paid into the Treasury of the United States. (United States Statutes at Large, Vol. XII, p. 1042.)

By the act of February 16, 1863, all treaties heretofore made and entered into with the Sisseton, Wahpeton, Mendawakanton, and Wahpakoota bands of Sioux Indians are declared to be abrogated and annulled so far as they impose any future obligations on the United States, and all lands and rights of occupancy within the State of Minnesota and all annuities and claims heretofore recorded to said Indians or any of them to be forfeited to the United States. (Sec. 1.)

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