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For all similar menibers of said bands, and also for the Cut-head bands of Yanktonai Sioux, a reservation as follows: “Beginning at the most easterly point of Devil's Lake, thence along the waters of said lake to the most westerly point of the same; thence on a direct line to the nearest point on the Cheyenne River; thence down said river to a point opposite the lower end of Aspen Island ; and thence on a direct line to the place of beginning." (Art. 4.)

The reservation shall be surveyed, 160 acres to each head of a family and each single person over twenty-one years; any one who shall cultivate a portion of his allotment for five consecutive years shall be entitled to a patent so soon as he shall have 50 acres of said tract fenced and in crops. Said patent shall not authorize any transfer of said lands or portions thereof except to the United States, and said lands and improvements shall descend to the proper heirs of the person obtaining a patent. (Art. 5.)

Congress, at its own discretion, from time to time, shall make such appropriation as may be deemed requisite to enable the Indians to return to an agricultural life, including, if thought advisable, the establishment and support of a manual labor school, and the employment of mechanical, agricultural, and other teachers, and opening and improving individual farms. (Art. 6.)

An agency shall be established at Lake Traverse, and whenever there shall be five hundred persons permanently located on the Devil's Lake Reservation an agent or other competent person shall be appointed to superintend the agrierltural, educational, and mechanical interests. (Art. 7.)

All expenditures shall be for agricultural improvement and civilization. No goods and provisions, except material for the crection of houses or to facilitate agriculture, shall be issued, excepting in payment for labor, or in cases of age, sickness, or deformity. (Art. 8.)

No person shall be authorized to trade for furs or peltries within the limits of the lands now claimed by these tribes. (Art. 9.)

Chiefs and head-men are authorized to adopt such rules and regulations for the security of life and property as may be necessary, and shall have authority under the direction of the agent, withont expense to the Government, to organize a force to carry out such rules and laws, and all rules and regulations as may be prescribed by the Interior Department. All rules and regulations adopted or amended by the chiefs shall receive the sauction of the agent. (Art. 10.)

Amended April 22, 1867 ; proclaimed May 2, 1867.'

By act of Congress, June 7, 1872, the Secretary of the Interior was authorized to report upon the title of the Sisseton and Wahpeton bands of Sioux to the land described in article 2, of the treaty of February 19, 1867, " or by virtue of any other law or treaty whatsoever, excepting such rights as were secured to said bands of Indians of the third and fourth articles of said treaty asó a permanent reservation’; and whether any, and if any, wbat, compensation ought, in justice and equity, to be made to said bands of Indians, respectively, for the extinguishinent of whatever title they may have had to said lands." ;

Agreement between the United States and the Sisseton and Wahpeton bands of Sioux In

dians, September 20, 1872.3 The Indians cede to the United States all the territory described in article 2 of the treaty of February 19, 1867, as well as all lands in the Territory of Dakota in which they have title or interest.

The United States agrees to pay $80,000 annually for ten years, the same to be apportioned to the Sisseton and Devil's Lake Agency in proportion to the number of Indians located upon the two reservations. The money to be expended under the

United States Statutes at Large, Vol. XV, p. 505. ? I bid., Vol. XVII, p. 281. • Agreement in full, Revision of Indian Treaties, p. 1050.

direction of the President in accordance with the provisions of the treaty of Feb. ruary 19, 1867, to wit, for goods and provisions, erection and maintaining manual. labor school and public schools, inills and workshops, opening and fencing farms, agricultural implements and stock. (Art. 2.)

By act of Congress of February 14, 1873, the agreement made September 20, 1872, was amended by omitting that part included in paragraphs 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9, "No payments to be made until after the ratification by said Indians of said agreement as hereby amended."

By act of Congress of June 22, 1874, the agreement confirmed as amended, and pay. ments authorized.2

DEVIL'S LAKE AGENCY.

[Post-office addre:s : Fort Totten, Ramsey County, Dak.]

DEVIL'S LAKE RESERVATION.

5

How established.-By treaty, February 19, 1867; agreement, September 20, 1872; confirmed, Act of Congress, June 22, 1874.3

Area and survey.-Contains 230,400 acres, of which 150,000 are classed as tillable. Outboundaries partly surveyed.

Acres cultivated.The Indians have under cultivation 3,155 acres.

Tribes and population.The tribes living here are the Cut-head, Sisseton, and Wahpeton Sioux. Total population, 937.5

Location. The agricultural features of the reservation are thus described:

Devil's Lake Indian Reservation (which includes the military reservation of Fort Totten)

lies along the southern shore of Devil's Lake, in northeastern Dakota, in latitude 48o. It is excellent agricultural land, producing cereals and vegetables of the very best quality in large and paying quantities.? Early flint and red corn also mature and yield surprisingly when not overtaken by early fall frosts, but the oc. currence of such frosts makes the corn crop an uncertain one. It also possesses sufficient timber for fuel, some of the oak being suitable for dimension lumber for build ing purposes.

Water is easily obtained [and] the prairies are unsurpassed for summer grazing.9 The bills contain large quantities of limestone, valuable for building purposes, and the ravines running out from the lake, together with driedup beds of numerous small lakes throughout the reservation, furnish an abundant supply of wild hay.10

Government rations.--Twelve per cent of these Indians subsisted by Government rations."

Mills and Indian employés.-A mill was erected in 1872.12 Employés reported in 1879.13

Indian police.- Established in 1880.14,
Indian court of offenses.- Established in 1883.15

3 See

United States Statutes, Vol. XVII, p. 456. ? Ibid., Vol. XVIII, p. 167. Sisseton Agency, Lake Traverse Reservation. * Report of Indian Commissioner, 1884, p. 306.

p.

306. " Ibid., 1886, p. 394. i Ibid., 1=81, p. 33. 8 Ibid., 1880, p. 28. 9 I bid., 1881, p. 33. 10 Ibid., 18-0, p. 28. 11 Ibid., 1836, p. 412. 12 Ibid., 1872, p. 259. 3 I bid., 1879, p. 28. 14 I bid., 1880, p. 30. 15 I bid., 1893, p. 2.

5 Ibid.,

School population, attendance, and support. School population as estimated in 1886 was 210; the following tables exhibits other school items:

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Missionary work.—The Presbyterian Church and the Roman Catholic Church have missions among these Indians. "Five churches and two missionaries reported in 1886.

TURTLE MOUNTAIN RESERVATION.

How established.-By Executive orders, December 21, 1882; March 29 and June 3, 1884.

Area and survey.-Contains 46,080 acres. Tillable acres, 15,000. Not surveyed.

Acres cultivated.-One thousand and fifty-five reported cultivated and broken in 1886.

Tribes and population. The tribes living here are the Chippewas, of the Mississippi. Total population, 1,245."

Location. The Turtle Mountain Reservation consists of two townships, which form the southeastern portion of the mountain, and contain sufficient arable land and also sufficient timber for the use of the Indians and mixed bloods.

Government rations.-Twenty-five per cent. of these Indians subsisted by Government rations in 1886.5

Mills and employés.- None reported.
Indian police.- None reported.
Indian court of offenses.- None reported.

School population, attendance, and support.-School population as estimated in 1856 was 263; other items are as follows:

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Missionary work.–The Roman Catholic Church has a mission here. One church and one missionary reported in 1886.

Report of Indian Commissioner, 1836, p. xe. ?Ibid., 1856, pp. 382, 426. • Ibid., 1836, p. 394. 4 I bid., p. 34. 5 Ibid., 1886, p. 412.

6 I bid., p. xc.

Erecutive orders,

DECEMBER 21, 1882. It is hereby ordered that the following-described country in the Territory of Dakota, viz: Beginning at a point on the international boundary where the tenth-gnide meridian west of the fifth principal meridian (being the range line between ranges 73 and 74 west of the fifth principal meridian) will, when extended, intersect said international boundary ; thence south on the tenth-guide meridian to the southeast corner of township 161 nortlı, range 74 west; thence east on the fifteenth standard parallel north, to the northeast corner of township 100 north, range 74 west; thence south on the tenth-guide meridian, west to the southeast corner of township 159 north, range 74 west; thence east on the line between townships 158 and 159 north to the southeast corner of township 159 north, range 70 west; thence north with the line between ranges 69 and 70 west to the northeast corner of township 160 north, range 70 west; thence west on the fifteenth standard parallel, north to the sontheast corner of town. ship 161 north, range 70 west; thence north on the line between rauges 69 and 70 west to the international boundary; thence west on the international boundary to the place of beginning, be, and the same is hereby, withdrawn from sale and settlement and set apart for the use and occupancy of the Turtle Mountain band of Chippewas and such other Indians of the Chippewa tribe as the Secretary of the Interior may see fit to settle thereon.

CHESTER A. ARTHCR.

MARCH 29, 18-4. It is hereby ordered that the tract of country in the Territory of Dakota with. drawn from sale and settlement and set apart for the use and occupancy of the Turtle Mountain band of Chippewa Indians by Executive order dated December 211, 882, escept townships 162 and 163 north, range 71 west, be, and the same is hereby, restored to the mass of the public domain.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

JUNE 3, 1884. The Executive order dated March 29, 1884, whereby certain lands in the Territory of Dakota previously set apart for the use and occupancy of the Turtle Mountain band of Chippewa Indians were, with the exception of towpships 162 and 163 worth, range 71 west, restorell to the mass of the public domain, is hereby amended so as to substitute township 162 porth, range 70 west, for township 163 north, rauge 71 west, the purpose and effect of such amendment being to withdraw from sale and settlement and set apart for the use and occupancy of said Indiaus said township 162 north, range 70 west, in lieu of towuship 163 north, range 71 west, which last inentioned township is thereby restored to the mass of the public domain.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

PONCA RESERVATION.

[In charge of Santee Agency, Nebraska.] How established.-By treaty of March 12, 1858, and supplemental treaty, March 10, 1865.

Area and survey.--Contains 96,000 acres.? Tillable acres not reported. Partly surveyed.?

1 Report of Indian Commissioner, 1806, p. 323. See treaties of Poncas, in Indian Territory. * Ibid., 1884, p. 257. 3 Ibid., p. 257.

Acres cultirated.--Acres cultivated, 519.

Tribes and population. The tribe living here is the Ponca. Popula. tion, 274.2

Location. The reservation is situated on the north side of the Nio. brara River where it empties into the Missouri.

Government rations.- None reported in 1886.
Mills and Indian employés.- None reportedl.
Indian police.- None reported.
Indian court of offences.- None reported.

School population, attendance, and support:3–
School population, as estimated in 1886

47 Government day school accommodation.

50 Average attendance..

9 In session (months)

11 Cost to Government.

$600.00 Missionary work.- No missionary stationed here.

YANKTON AGENCY.

[Post-office address, Yankton Agency, Greenwood, Dak.]

YANKTON RESERVATION.

How established.-By treaty of April 19, 1858.

Area and survey.-Contaius 430,405 acres, of which 25,000 are classed as tillable. Surveyed.

Acres cultivated.-The Indians have under cultivation 2,911 acres.

Tribes and population. The tribe living here is the Yankton Sioux. Population, 1,776.6

Location.-This reservation has been thus described: By treaty of 1858 the Yanktons, then laying claim to some millions of acres in Dakota, ceded all to the Government, except some 430,000 acres comprised in their present reservation lying 30 miles along the Missouri River and over 20 mile3 back. Its eastern boundary is Choteau Creek, some 45 miles from Yankton. The tract contains some 15,000 acres of river bottom, timbered occasionally with cottonwood, and varying from one quarter of a mile to 2 miles in width. The remainder consists of bigb, rolling praries."

Government rations.-Fifty per cent. of these Indians subsisted by Government rations in 1886.8

Mills and employés.--A mill was built in 1859. Employés were re. ported in 1873.

Indian police.—Reorganized in 1882.
Indian court of offenses.-Reported established.

1

Report of Indian Commissioner, 1886, 432. ? I bid., p. 402. 3 Ibid., 1886, p. xcit. * I bid., 1834, p. 306. 5 Ibid., 1886, p. 428. 6 Ibid., p. 396. 1878, p. 46. * Ibid., 1886, p. 414.

? I bid.,

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