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Acres cultivated.-Not reported separately from agency report of all the reservations.

Tribes and population.—The tribes living here are the Iowa and Ton. kawa. Iowas number eighty-four.

Location. The reservation lies between the Cimarron River on the north, Deep Fork Canadian River on the south, Sac and Fox Reserve on the east, and Indian meridian on the west. The soil is sandy, grass grows fairly, so that in summer there is grazing. One-third of the reservation is tiunbered, and about 7 per cent. arable land.

Government rations. None issued.
Mills and Indian employés.-Not reported.
Indian police.-Not reported.
Indian court of offences.-Not reported.

School population, attendance, and support.-School population, as estimated in 1886, 21. No separate school reported.

Executive order.3

AUGUST 15, 1883. It is hereby ordered that the following-described tract of country in the Indian Territory, viz: Commencing at the point where the Deep Fork of the Canadian River intersects the west boundary of the Sac and Fox Reservation; thence north along said west boundary to the south bank of the Cimarron River; thence up said Cimarron River to the Indian meridian; thence south along said Indian meridian to the Deep Fork of the Canadian River; thence down said Deep Fork to the place of beginning, be, and the same hereby is, set apart for the permanent use and occupation of the Iowa and such other Indians as the Secretary of the Interior may see fit to locate thereon.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR. For treaties relating to Iowas, see Iowa treaties–Kansas.

KICKAPOO RESERVATION.

How established.-By Executive order August 15, 1883.

Area and survey.Contains 206,466 acres. Tillable acres not reported. Surveyed.

Acres cultivated.-Not reported separately.

Tribes and population.—The tribe living here is the Mexican Kicka. poo. Population, 326.5

Location. The reservation is a tract of land bounded on the north by the Iowa Reservation, on the east by that of the Sac and Fox, on the south by North Fork Canadian River, on the west by the Indian meridian; contains about 190,000 acres, of which 25 per cent. is covered with timber, post oak and jack oak; 65 per cent. high rolling prairie, and about 10 per cent. good agricultural land, lying mostly on the North Fork Canadian and its tributaries, though a portion of the upland prairie would produce fair crops.

Government rations.-Five per cent. of these Indians subsisted by Government rations as reported in 1886.7

6

2 Ibid.,

p. 144.

3 Ibid., p. 330.

1 Report of Indian Commissioner, 1886, p. 398. * Ibid., p. 383. Ibid., p. 398. Ibid., p. 144.

; Ibid., p. 416.

School population, attendance, and support.-School population, as estimated in 1886, 70. No separated school reported.

Missionary work. --Under Society of Friends.

Kickapoo Reserve.?

EXECUTIVE MANSION, August 15, 1883. It is hereby ordered that the following-described tract of country in the Indian Territory, viz: Commencing at the south west corner of the Sao and Fox Reservatioa; thence north along the western boundary of said reservation to the Deep Fork of the Canadian River; thence up said Deep Fork to the point where it intersects the Indian meridian; thence south along said Indian meridian to the North Fork of the Canadian River; thence down said river to the place of beginning, be, and the same hereby is, set apart für the permanent use and occupation of the Kickapoo Indians.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

POTTAWATOMIE RESERVATION.

How established.-By treaty of February 27, 1867; act of Congress approved May 23, 1872.

Arca and survey.-Contained 575,877 acres.3 Tillable acres not reported. Two hundred and twenty-two thousand seven hundred and sixteen acres are Creek ceded lands, 353,161 acres are Seminole lands. Surveyed.4

Acres cultivated.-Not reported separately.

Tribes and population.-The tribes living here are the Absentee Shawnee, and Pottawatomie. Population, 1,087.5

Location. The reservation lies south of North Fork of Canadian, west of Seminole Nation, north of South Canadian, East Indian meridian. About 40 per cent. is covered with timber similar to that of the Sac and Fox Reservation, 50 per cent. high rolling prairie suitable for grazing purposes, the remaining 10 per cent. fair to good agricultural land.

Government rations.- None issued.
Indian police.-Not reported.
Indian court of offences.-Not reported.

School population, attendance, and support."

285

86

School population, as estimated in 1886.
Shawneetown school accommodations.
Average attendance .....
Shawneetown school, cost to Government.
In session (months).

40 $5, 645.79

11

Missionary work.--Society of Friends has charge of work among both tribes, and the Roman Catholic Church has a mission among the Potta watomies. 8

9

1 Report of Indian Commissioner, 1886, p. 146.

2 Ibid.,

P.

330. 3 Ibid , 1884, p. 258. * Ibid., p. 259. Ibid., 1886, p. 398. 6 Ibid., p. 143. Ibid., p. xcii.

8 lbid.,

5

p. 146.

SYNOPSIS OF TREATIES WITH THE POTTAWATOMIE INDIANS.

For treaties of January 9, 1789, and August 3, 1795, see Chippewa treaty, same date-Michigan.

Treaty with the Delawares, Shawnees, Pottawatomies, Miamis, Eel River, Weas, Kickapoos,

Piankeshaws, and Kaskaskias, made at Fort Wayne, June 7, 1803. Boundaries at Saint Vincennes, as held by French and British Government, defined as follows: Beginning at Point Coupée, on the Wabash; thence by a line north 78 dogrees west 12 miles; thence by line parallel with Wabash until intersected by a line at right angles to the same passing through the mouth of White River; thence by this line across the Wabash and toward the Ohio 72 miles; thence by a line north 12 degrees west until intersected by live passing through Point Coupée, and by last line to place of beginning. United States reserves all lands adjacent to this part to which Indian title has been extinguished. (Art. 1.) United States relinquishies all claim to land adjoining. (Art. 2.) Indians cede the salt springs in Southern Ohio; United States to deliver 150 bushels to tribes. Three houses of entertainment to be erected on roads between Saint Vincennes and Kaskaskias and Clarksville, including ferries. (Art. 4.) If settlements by United States citizens fall within Indian country, boandaries to be changed. (Art. 5.)

Proclaimed December 26, 1803.1
For treaty of July 4, 1805, see Chippewa treaty, same date-Michigan.

Treaty with the Delawares, Pottawatomies, Miamis, Eel Rivers, and Weas, made near Vin

cennes, August 21, 1805.

Delawares cede land claimed in article 4, treaty of August, 1804. (Art. 1.) Their right to do so acknowledged by other tribes to this treaty. (Art. 5.) Miami, Eel River, and Wea cede land between Fort Wayne and the Ohio, not including the Driftwood Fork of White River. (Art. 2.) Permanent annuity: Miamis, $600; Eel River, $250 ; Weas, $250 ; Pottawatomies, $500, for ten years. The sum of $4,000 was delivered. (Art. 3.) Miamis, Eel Rivers, and Weas to be considered one nation, and as owners of country on Wabash and tributaries above the Saint Vincennes tract. This not to affect claims of Kickapoos. (Art. 4.) Annuities delivered in usual manner. (Art. 6.) Treaty binding when ratified. (Art. 7.)

Proclaimed, April 24, 1806.2

For treaties of November 7, 1807, and November 28, 1808, see Chippewa treaty, same date-Michigan.

Treaty between the United States and the Delawares, Pottawatomies, Eel Rivers, and Mi

amis, made at Fort Wayne, September 30, 1809. Indians agree to cede all that tract of country which shall be included between the boundary line established by the treaty of June 7, 1803, the Wabash, and a line from the mouth of Racoon Creek, 12 miles below the mouth of the Vermilion River, so as to strike the boundary line established by the treaty of August 21, 1805, at such a distance from its commencement at the northeast corner of the Vincennes tract as will leave the tract now ceded 30 miles wide at the narrowest place. Also, beginning at Fort Recovery, thence southwardly along the general boundary line, established by the treaty of August 3, 1795, to its intersection with the boundary line established by the treaty of August 21, 2005; thence along said line to a point from which a line drawn parallel to the first mantioned line will be 12 miles distant from the same, and along the said parallel line to its intersection, with a line to be drawn from Fort Recovery, parallel to the line established by the said treaty of August 21, 1805.

United States Statutes at Large, Vol. VII, p. 74.

? Ibid., p. 91.

(Art. 1.) Delawares' right to White River country acknowledged. Improvements made by them or the Mohecans to be theirs forever. (Art. 2.) Permanent annuity: Delawares, Miamis, and Pottawatomies $500 each; Eel Rivers, $250. (Art. 3.) Manner paying annuities similar to Greenville treaty. (Art. 4.) Consent of Weas to be obtained, for which annuity of $300 to be paid. (Art. 5.) Five thousand two hundred dollars in addition annuities paid. (Art. 6.) Depredations upon Indians by Indians to be paid out of annuities. (Art. 7.) Agree to relinquish their right to the reservation at the old Ouroctenon towns, nade by the treaty of August 3, 1795, so far at least as to make no further use of it than for the establishment of a military post. (Art. 8.) Annuity of $400 granted if Kickapoos agree. (Art. 9.) Miamis being the larger owners of land ceded, further compensation made, $500, to be expended in domestic animals for three years, beside blacksmith; and if Kickapoos agree to cession a permanent annuity of $200. To Wea and Eel River further annuity of $100 each. (Separate article.) Proclaimed January 16, 1810.'

Treaty with the Weas, made at Vincennes, October 26, 1809. Weas consent to preceding treaty. Annuity of $300 granted ; $1,500 delivered at treaty. Proclaimed January 25, 1810.2

Treaty with the Kickapoos, December 9, 1809. Indians agree to article 9, treaty of September 30, 1809, and cede land on Vermilion River. Annuity of $100 and presents of goods. (Art. 1.) If Miamis should not agree to cession, and United States not take possession, annuity cancelled. (Art. 2.)

Proclaimed March 8, 1810.3

Treaty with the Pottawatomies, made at Portage des Sioux, July 18, 1815. Injuries mutually forgiven. (Art. 1.) Perpetual peace and friendship. (Art. 2.) Prisoners to be delivered up at Fort Clarke, on the Illinois River. (Art. 3.) Former treaties confirmed. (Art. 4.)

Proclaimed December 26, 1815.4

For treaties of September 8, 1815 ; August 24, 1816; September 29, 1817, and September 17, 1818, see Chippewa treaty, same date-Michigan.

Treaty with Pottawatomies, made at Saint Mary's, Ohio, October 2, 1818. Indians cede land as follows: Beginning at the mouth of the Tippecanoe River and running up the same to a point 25 miles in a direct line from the Wabash River; thence on a line as nearly parallel to the general course of the Wabash River as practicable, to a point on the Vermilion River 25 miles from the Wabash River; thence down the Vermilion River to its mouth, and thence up the Wabash River to the place of beginning. Also cede all their claim to the country south of the Wabash River. (Art. 1.) United States to purchase Kickapoo claim to said land. (Art. 2.) Perpetual annuity of $2,500 in silver. (Art. 3.) Land granted to certain individ. uals. (Art. 4.)

Proclaimed January 15, 1819.5
For treaty of August 29, 1821, see Chippewa treaty, same date-Michigan.
For treaty of August 19, 1825, see Sioux treaty, same date-Dakota.

Treaty with the Pottawatomies, on the Wabash, October 16, 1826. Indians cede land as follows: Beginning on the Tippecanoe River, where the northern boundary of the tract ceded by the treaty of October 2, 1818, intersects the same; thence in a direct line to a point on Eel River, half-way between the mouth of said river and Pierish's village; thence np Eel River to Seek's village, near the United States Statutes at Large, Vol. VII, p. 113. * Ibid., p. 116.

3 Ibid., p. 117. 4 Ibid., p. 123. 5 Ibid., p. 185.

head thereof; thence in a direct lino to the ino:ath of a creek emptying into the St. Joseph's of the Miami, near Metea's village; thenco up the St. Joseph's to the bouvd. ary line between the States of Indiana and Ohio; thence south to the Miami; thence up the same to the reservation at Fort Wayne; thence with the lines of the said reservation to the boundary established by the treaty of October 6, 1818; thence with the said line to the Wabash River; thence with the same river to the mouth of the Tippecanoe River; and thence with the said Tippecanoe River to the place of beginning. Also cedo all their rights to land within the following limits : Beginning at a point upon Lake Michigan, 10 miles due north of the southern extreme thereof; thence due east to the land ceded by treaty of August 29, 1821 ; thence south with the boundary thereof 10 miles; thence west to the southern extreme of Lake Michigan; thence with the shore thereof to place of beginning. (Art. 1.) Indians cede tract 100 feet wide for road from Lake Michigan to Wabash River. Also similar road through Indianapolis to the Obio. (Art. 2.) Sale of sections to pay certain claims, amounting to $9,573. (Art. 5.) Annuity of $2,000 in silver for twenty-two years; also to build mill and provide miller and blacksmith; one hundred and sixty bushels of salt; $2,000 for education, so long as Congress shall see proper. (Art. 3.) Also $30,547.71 worth of goods. (Art. 4.) Grants to individuals. (Art. 6.) Indians to hunt on ceded land so long as property of United States. (Art. 7.) Certain articles only may be rejected. (Art. 8.) Treaty binding when ratified. (Art. 9.) Proclaimed February 27, 1827.1

Treaty with the Pottawatomies, made at Saint Joseph, Mich., September 19, 1827. Ninety-nine sections heretofore reserved for Indians ceded to the United States. Treaty binding when ratified.

Proclaimed February 23, 1829.2
For treaty of August 25, 1828, see Chippewa treaty, same date-Michigan.

Treaty with the Pottawatomies, made at Saint Joseph, Mich., September 20, 1828. Indians cedeland as follows: (1) Beginning at the mouth of the Saint Joseph, of Lake Michigan, and thence running up the said river to a point on the same river half-way between La-vache-qui-pisse and Maconsin village; thence in a direct line to the nineleenth mile tree on the northern boundary line of the State of Indiana; thence with the samo west to Lake Michigan; and thence, with the shore of said lake, to the place of beginning. (2) Beginning at a point on the line run in 1817 due east from the southern extreme of Lake Michigan, which point is due south from the head of the most easterly branch of the Kankakee River, and from that point running south 10 miles; thence in a direct line to the northeast corner of Flatbelly's Reservation; thenco to the northwest corner of the reservation at Seek's village; thence, with the lines of the said reservation and of former cessions, to the line between the States of Indiana and Ohio; thence with the same to the former-described lire, running due east from the southern extreme of Lake Michigan; and thence with the said line to the place of beginning. (Art. 1.) Perpetual annuity of $2,000; $1,000 for twenty years ; $30,000 worth of goods : $10,000 in goods and $5,000 in specie to be paid in 1829. The sum of $7,500 in clearing and fencing land, erecting houses, purchasing stock, farming implements, etc. Two thousand ponnds of tobacco annually, besides iron and steel. Sum of $1.000 per ananı for education. Blacksmith permanently established. Three laborers provided. (Art. 2.) Grants to individuals. (Art. 3.) Claims amounting to $10,895 paid.3 (Art 4.) Value of mission station on Saint Joseph, when tribe removed, to be paid by tho linited States. (Art. 5.) Treaty binding when ratified. (Art. 6.)

Proclaimol January 7, 1329.4
For treaty of July 29, 18:29, seo Chipporra treaty, samo date-Michigan.

United States Statutes at Large, Vol. VII, p. 295. ? Ibid., p. 305. :3 For claims, son Ibid., p. 603.

* Ibid.,

P. 317.

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