Page images
PDF
EPUB

said reservation and running thence north 60 degrees west 80 chains to a stone upon which is cut “U. S. No. 2;" thence north 70 degrees west 97 chains to a stone upon which is cut “U. S. No. 3;" thence south 56 chains and 50 links to a monument of stones on the top of a bill; thence south 70 degrees east 97 chains to a monument of stones at the base of a bill; thence south 60 degrees east 80 chains to a stone set in the ground rising 2 feet above, upon which is cut “U. S., S. E. corner;" thence north 56 chains and 50 links to place of beginning.

The act in question provides that the reservations shall not include any claim of settler or miner, yet the lands described above includes the claim of Volney Rector. Inasmuch, however, as Inspector Vandever reports the improvements of Mr. Rector to be just what are required for the agency, and that Mr. Rector bas relinquished the possession thereof to the United States for $1,800, the appraised value of two years ago, made by Conmissioners Ingalls and Powell, I deem the law to have been complied with, and therefore submit the selection herein made for your approval, with the suggestion, if approved by you, that the lands herein selected be set apart for the Pai-Ute Indians.

The return of the letter of Inspector Vandever is herewith requested, with your directions in the premises.? Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. R. CLUM,

Acting Commissioner. The Hon. SECRETARY OF THE INTERIOR.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

Washington, D. C., July 3, 1875. Sir: I return the report of William Vandever, United States Indian inspector, which accompanied your communication of the 28th ultimo, in which are defined the boundaries of the Pai-Ute Reservation in south-eastern Nevada, embracing 1,000 acres, to which area said reserve was by act of March 3, 1875, declared to be reduced; the land to be selected by the Secretary of the Interior.

The selection of the tract of country described in the report of Inspector Vandever is approved, and hereby set apart as a reservation for the Pai-Ute Indians. Very respectfully,

C. DELANO, Secretary. The COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS.

WESTERN SHOSHONE AGENCY.

[Post-office address : White Rock, Elko County, Nev.]

DUCK VALLEY RESERVATION.

How established.-By Executive orders, April 16, 1877, and May 4, 1886.

Area and survey.--Contains 243,200 acres.? Tillable acres not reported. Not surveyed.

Acres cultivated.-The Indians had under cultivation 366 acres 3 in 1886.

Tribes and population. The tribes living here are the Western Sho. shone, and Indians wandering in Nevada. Total population, 3,680.4

Location.-“The Western Shoshone Reservation is situated partly in the county of Elko, State of Nevada, and partly in the county of Owyhee, Idaho, and is about 100 miles nearly due north from the town of Elko,

1 Report of Indian Commissioner, 1886, p. 343. Ibid., 1884, p. 261, 1886, p. 432. 4 Ibid., p. 402.

[ocr errors]

3 Ibid.,

on the line of the Central Pacific Railroad. Its altitude is given as 5,800 feet above the level of the sea.”

Duck Valley proper is from 15 to 16 miles long, and about 14 to 3 miles wide; that is, that portion fit for cultivation, hay, or pasture purposes. It is bounded on the east by a barren, basaltic mountain; on the west by a vast desert, open plain, or low plateau, composed chiefly of lava rock, cut up by deep gorges and cañons; on the south by mineralized spurs that make down from the main Bull Run of mountains, which affords splendid pasture during the summer and fall; and on the north by a chain of small, unimportant valleys, except for pasture, until you reach the Bruneau Valley.'

Gorernment rations.-Fifty per cent. of these Indians subsisted by Government rations as reported in 1886.2

Mills and Indian employés.- No mills; Indian employés reported.”
Indian police.- Established in 1879.4
Indian court of offences.-Established in 1883.5

School population, attendance, and support.6

School population, as estimated in 1836....
Day school accommodation....
Day school average attendance.
Session (months)....
Cost to Government...

48 40 19

11 $720

Missionary work.—No missionary work reported.

SYNOPSIS OF TREATIES.

Treaty made at Ruby Valley, Nevada Territory, between the United States and the western

band of Shoshone Indians, October 1, 1863.

The following country is claimed by the said band: “On the north by Wonggogada Mountains and Shoshone River Valley; on the west by Sunontoyah Mountains or Smith Creek Mountains; on the south by Wicobah and the Colorado Desert; on the east by Pohonobe Valley or Steptoe Valley and Great Salt Lake Valley.” (Art. 5.) The President shall, when he deems it expedient, set apart a reservation within the country described. The Indians agree to remove to such reservation and reside therein. (Art. 6.) Travel now or hereafter through the Shoshone country shall be free. The President may establish inilitary posts and houses for the comfort of travellers, and for mail and telegraph companies. (Art. 2.) Telegraph and overland stage lines shall not be molested and the Pacific Railroad and its branches shall be located, constructed, and operated through the country. (Art. 3.) Offenders are to be delivered up to the United States authorities. (Art. 2.) Compensation for the loss of game incident to settlement and travel shall be for twenty years the sum of $5,000, to be paid by the United States annually in such articles, including cattle, as the President may deem best. (Art. 7.) Five thousand dollars' worth of presents acknowledged as received at the conclusion of this treaty. (Art. 8.)

Amended June 26, 1866; proclaimed October 21, 1869.7 1 Report of Indian Commissioner, 1882, p. 120. ? Ibid., 1886, p. 420. 3 Ibid., 1884,

* Ibid., 1879, p. 112. 5 Ibid., 1884, p. 129. 6 Ibid., 1886, p. xcvi. 7 United States Statutes at Large, Vol. XVIII, p. 689.

p. 128.

Treaty made at Tuilla Valley, Utah Territory, between the United Stales and the Sho

shonce-Goship bands of Indians, October 12, 1863.

The country claimed is as follows: “On the north by the middle of the Great Desert; on the west by Steptoe Valley; on the south by Tooedoe or Green Mountains ; and on the east by Great Salt Lake, Tuilla, and Rush Valleys." (Art. 5.) The treaty agreements are the same as those of the treaty of October 1, 1863, except article 4, (see page 499), which permits prospecting for gold and silver and other nietals, and the working of mines when discovered, the forming of mining and agricultural settlements, the erecting of mills, and the use of timber for building and other purposes. The United States agrees to pay annually, for the tern of twenty years, $1,000, including cattle for herding.

Amended by the Senate, March 7, 1864; proclaimed January 17, 1865. 1

Executive order.2

APRIL 16, 1877. It is hereby ordered that the following described tract of country, situated partly in the Territory of Idaho and partly in the State of Nevada, be, and the same hereby is, withdrawn from the public domain, to wit: Commencing at the one hundredth mile-post of the survey of the north boundary of Nevada; thence due north to the . intersection of the north boundary of township 16 south of Boisé base-line in Idabo; thence due west to a point due north of the one hundred and twentieth mile-post of said survey of the uorth boundary of Nevada ; thence due south to the ninth stand. ard parallel north of the Mount Diablo base-line in Nevada; thence due east to a point due south of the place of beginning. And the above-vamed tract of land is hereby set apart as a reservation for the western Shoshone Indians, subject to such modifications of boundary as a location of limits sball determine.

R. B. HAYES. Executive order. 3

MAY 4, 1886. It is hereby ordered that the following described lands in the Territory of Idaho, viz: Township 15 south, ranges 1, 2, and 3 east of the Boisó meridian, be, and the same are hereby, withdrawn from sale and settlement and set apart as an addition to the Duck Valley Reservation, for the use and occupation of Paddy Caps band of Pi-Utes and such other Indians as the Secretary of the Interior may see fit to settle thereon: Prorided, however, That any tract or tracts of land within said townships, the title to which has passed out of the United States, or to which valid homestead or pre-emption rights have attached under the laws of the United States, prior to this date, are hereby excluded from the operations of this order.

GROVER CLEVELAND. Carlin Farms Reserve. 4

EXECUTIVE MANSION, May 10, 1877. It is hereby ordered that all that tract of country in the State of Nevada (known as the Carlin farms), lying within the following boundaries, viz: Beginning at the quarter-section corner post on the west boundary of section 6, township 35 north, rauge 52 east, Mount Diablo meridian; thence south 62° 56' east 4,2294 feet, to a post marked “U. S. I. R. station B;" thence north 20 4' east 1,928 feet to a post marked “U.S. I. R. station C;" thence north 3° 9' west 2,122 feet to a post marked “U. S. I. R. station D;” thence south 85° 8' west 3,000 feet to a post marked “U.S. I. R. station E;" thence north 52 32' west 4,046 feet to a post marked “U.S. I. R. station

United States Statutes at Large, Vol. XIII, p. 681. 2 Report of Commissioner of Indian Affairs, 1886, p. 343. 3 Ibid., p. 343. 4 Ibid., p. 342.

F;" thence north 39° 25' west 1,200 feet to a post marked “U.S. I. R. station G;" thence south 44° 10' west 2,200 feet to a post marked “U. S. I. R. station H;" thence south 44° 29' east 2,663 feet to a post marked “U.S. I. R. station I;" thence south 58° 57' east 2,535 feet to a post marked “U.S. I. R. station K;" thence south 59° 29' east 878 feet to a post marked “U. S. I. R. station A," the place of beginning, containing 521.61 acres, be, and the same hereby is, withdrawn from sale or settlement and set apart as a reservation for the north-western Shoshone Indians.

R. B. HAYES.

EXECUTIVE Mansiox, January 16, 1879. It is hereby ordered that the order of May 10, 1877, setting apart as a reservation for the north-western Shoshone Indians of Nevada, the following described lands (known as the Carlin farms), viz: Beginning at the quarter-section corner post on the west boundary of section 6, township 35 north, rauge 52 east, Mount Diablo meridian ; thence south 62° 56' east 4,2294 feet to a post marked “U. S. I. R. station B;" thence north 20 4' east 1,928 feet to a post marked “U. S. I. R. station C;" thence north 3° 9' west 2,122 feet to a post marked “U. S. I. R. station D;” thence south 85° 8' west 3,000 feet to a post marked “U. S. I. R. station E;" thence north 52° 32' west 4,046 feet to a post marked “U. S. I. R. station F;" thence north 39° 25' west 1,200 feet to a post marked. “ U. S. I. R. station G ;” thence south 44° 10' west 21,200 feet to a post marked “U. S. I. R. station H;" thence south 44° 29' east 2,663 feet to a post marked “U. S. I. R. station I;" thence south 58° 57' east 2,535 feet to a post marked “U. S. I. R. station K;" thence south 59° 29' east 878 feet to a post marked “U. S. I. R. station A,” the place of beginning, be, and the same is hereby, cancelled and said lands are hereby restored to their original status.'

R. B. HAYES.

NEW MEXICO,

Organized as a Territory, September 9, 1850.2

The Indian tribes residing here are about the same as when the country became a part of the United States, with the exception of some of the Apache tribes which have been removed.

There are twenty-two reservations containing an aggregate area of 9,586,525 acres. Of this amount 691,805 acres are confirmed by Spanish grants to nineteen Pueblos. Total population, 28,259.

There are three agencies: The Mescalero Agency having charge of the Mescalero Apache Reservation; the Navajo Agency having charge of the Navajo Reservation; the Pueblo Agency having charge of the twenty Pueblos as follows: Jemez, Acoma, San Juan, Picuris, San Felipe, Pecos, Cocbiti, Santo Domingo, Taos, Santa Clara, Tesuque, San Ildefonso, Poajoaque, Zia, Sandia, Isleta, Nambe, Laguna, Santa Ana, and Zuñi.

Pueblo Industrial School Reserve.3

EXECUTIVE MANSION, October 3, 1884. It is hereby ordered that the following described tract of land in the county of Bernalillo and Territory of New Mexico, viz, all that certain piece, parcel, or tract of land situate, lying, and being in the county of Bernalillo and Territory of New Mexico, bounded on the north by lands of J. K. Basye, on the east by lands of Diego Garcia and Miguel Antonio Martin and others, on the south by lands of the Jesuit fathers, and on the west by lands of the Jesuit fathers, said tract being more particularly bounded

1 Report of Indian Commissioner, 1836, p. 243. 2 United States Statutes at Large, Vol. IX, p. 446. 3 Report of Indian Commissioner, 1886, p. 351.

and described as follows, to wit: Beginning at a stake at the north-west corner of the lands formerly owned by John H. McMiun and running thence north 4° 53' west 731.7 feet to a stake at the north-west corner of the land hereby conveyed; thence north 84° 52' east 2,320.7 feet to a stake at the north-east corner of the land hereby conveyed; thence south 3° 45' east 720.4 feet to a stake; thence south 7° 30' west 793 feet to a stake at the south-east corner of the land hereby conveyed; thence north 85° 50' west 184.6 feet to a stake; thence north 87° 42' west 615 feet to a stake; thence north 81° 52' west 203 feet to a stake; thence north 78° 44' west 224 feet to a stake; thence north 73° 19' west 176.4 feet to a stake; thence north 70° 14' west 234 feet to a stake; thence north 78° 38' west 567.7 feet to a stake at the south-west corner of the land hereby conveyed ; and thence north 6° 8' west 234.4 feet to the point and place of beginning, containing 65.79 acres, more or less; which said tract of land was conveyed to the United States of America by a certain deed of conveyance bearing date the 7th day of June, A. D. 1882, from Elias S. Clark, of the town of Albuquerque, in the county and Territory aforesaid, as a site for an industrial school for Pueblo and other Indians, and the erection thereon of suitable buildings and other improvements for such purposes, be, and the same hereby is, reserved and set apart for Indian purposes.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

MESCALERO AND JICARILLA AGENCY.

[Post-office address, South Fork, Lincoln County, N. Mex.]

MESCALERO APACHE RESERVATION.

Hou established.-By Executive orders, May 29, 1873; February of 1874; October 20, 1875; May 19, 1882, and March 241, 1883.

Area and survey.--Contains 474,240 acres. Number of acres tillable, 300.

Acres cultirated.--Two hundred and ninety-five acres under cultivation by the Indians.'

Tribes and population. The tribes living here are the Mescalero, Jicarilla, and Minbre Apache. Total population, 1,205.2

Location. The Mescalero Agency is in Lincoln County, N. Mex., and is somewhat romantically located in the Tularosa Cañon, Sacramento Mountains. The cañon is narrow, but well watered. The mountains on each side rise to something like 1,500 feet above the agency, and about 7,500 feet above the sea level. They are rugged and covered with a pretty dense growth of piñon and cedar, interspersed with firs on the north sides.

Government rations.-Eighty-five per cent. of these Indians subsisted by Government rations, as reported in 1886.4

Mills and Government employés.-Not reported.
Indian police.-Organized.
Indian court of offences. Organized.

1

? Ibid., p. 402.

3 Ibid., p. 198.

Report of Indian Commissioner, 1886, p. 432. * Ibid., p. 420.

« PreviousContinue »