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312

School population, attendance, and support.
School population, as estimated in 1886...
Boarding school:

Accommodation ....
Average attendance.
Session (months)...

Cost....
Day school:

Accommodation.....
Average attendance.
Session (months)..
Cost.....

36 31

12 $4,590.99

12

9

10 1 $412.91

Missionary work.--Not any reported.

Bosque Redondo Reserve. ?

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,
OFFICE OF INDIAN AFFAIRS,

January 14, 1864. SIR: My attention has been called by Superintendent Steck, of New Mexico, to the necessity of designating a tract of land in New Mexico 40 miles square, with Bosque Redondo as the centre, as a reservation for the Apache Indians.

In a former letter to this office, a copy of which was transmitted to you with report thereon, under date of December 16, 1863, Superintendent Steck speaks of the proposed reservation as well adapted to Indian purposes, for a limited number. Mr. Steck estimates the number of Apaches to be about 3,000, and the quantity of arable land within the boundaries of the proposed reservation at not exceeding 6,000 acres. Surveyor-General Clark, of New Mexico, in a letter to Mr. Steck, a copy of which was transmitted to you with the report before mentioned, makes the same estimate as to the quantity of arablo land within 40 miles square, with Bosque Redondo as a centre.

Owing to the fact that the arable land lies along the water-courses, it seems to be necessary that the area of the reservation should be as large as that proposed by Mr. Steck, in order to suitably accommodate the estimated number of Apaches, and isolate them as far as possible from the whites.

For the reasons given by Mr. Steck in his letter before referred to, as well as for those given in his annual report for 1863, to both of which reference is had, should you concur in the propriety of reserving the tract of land mentioned for the use of the Apaches, I would respectfully recommend that the subject be laid before the President, with the recommendation that the same may be withheld from pre-emption and settlement, and under his proclamation be set apart for Indian purposes. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM P. DOLE,

Commissioner,
Hon. John P. USHER,
Secretary of the Interior.

(First indorsement.)
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

January 15, 1864. Respectfully laid before the President, with the recommendation that the reservation be set apart for the purposes herein indicated.

J. P. USHER,

Secretary. Report of Indian Commissioner, 1886, p. xciv.

' Ibid., p. 346.

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(Second indorsement.)

Approved January 15, 1864.

A. LINCOLN.

(See Report of General Land Office for 1873, p. 103.)

Fort Stanton Indian Reserve (Mescalero Apache). 1

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,
OFFICE OF INDIAN AFFAIRS,

May 23, 1873. The above diagram is intended to show a proposed reservation for the Mescalero band of Apache Indians in New Mexico; said proposed reservation is indicated on the diagrain by the red lines bordered with yellow, and is described as follows, viz:

Commencing at the south-west corner of the Fort Stanton reduced military reservation, and running thence due south to a point on the hills near the north bank of the Rio Rindoso; thence along said hills to a point above the settlements; thence across said river to a point on the opposite hills, and thence to the same line upon which we start from Fort Stanton; and thence due south to the thirty-third degree north latitude; thence to the top of the Sacramento Mountains, and along the top of said mountains to the top of the White Mountains; thence along the top of said mountains to the beadwaters of the Rio Nogal to a point opposite the starting point, and thence to the starting point.

I respectfully recommend that the President be requested to order that the land comprised within the above-described limits be withheld froin entry and settlement as public lands, and that the same be set apart as an Indian reservation, as indicated in my report to the Department of this date.

EDW. P. SMITH,

Commissioner.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,

May 26, 1873. Respectfully presented to the President with the recommendation that he make the order above proposed by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs.

C. DELANO,

Secretary.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, May 29, 1873. It is hereby ordered that the tract of country above described be withheld from entry and settlement as public lands, and that the same be set apart as a reservation for the Moscalero Apache Indians, as recommended by the Secretary of the Interior and Commissioner of Indian Affairs.

U. S. GRAXT.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, February 2, 1874. In lieu of an Executive order dated the 29th of May last, setting apart certain lands in New Mexico as a reservation for the Mescalero Apaches, which order is hereby cancelled, it is hereby ordered that there be withdrawn from sale or other disposition, and set apart for the uso of said Mescalero Apaches and such other Indians as the Department may see fit to locate thereon, the tract of country in New Mexico (except so much thereof as is embraced in the Fort Stanton reduced military reservation) bounded as follows, viz:

Beginning at the most northerly point of the Fort Stanton reduced military reservation ; thence due west to the summit of the Sierra Blanca Mountains; thence due south to the thirty-third degree north latitude; thence due east to a point due south

1 Report of Indian Commissioner, 1886, p. 347.

of the most easterly point of the said Fort Stanton reduced military reservation; thence due north to the southern boundary of township 11 ; thence due west to the south-west corner of township 11, in range 13; thence due north to the second correction line south; thence due east along said line to a point opposite the line running north from the thirty-third degree north latitude; thence due north to the most easterly point of said Fort Stanton reduced military reservation; thence along the north-eastern boundary of said military reservation to the place of beginning."

U. S. GRANT.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, October 20, 1875. In lieu of Executive order dated February 2, 1874, setting apart certain lands in New Mexico as a reservation for the Mescalero Apaches, which order is hereby cancelled, it is hereby ordered that there be withdrawn from sale or other disposition, and set apart for the use of said Mescalero Apaches, and such other Indians as the Department may see fit to locate thereon, the tract of country in New Mexico (except so much thereof as is embraced in the Fort Stanton reduced military reservation) bounded as follows:

Beginning at the most northerly point of the Fort Stanton reduced military reservation; running thence due west to a point due north of the north-east corner of town. ship 14 south, range 10 east; thence due south along the eastern boundary of said township to the thirty-third degree north latitude; thence duo east on said parallel to a point due south of the most easterly point of the said Fort Stanton reduced military reservation; thence due north to the southern boundary of township 11; thence due west to the south-west corner of township 11, in range 13; thence due north to the second correction line south; thence due east along said line to a point opposite the line running north from the thirty-tbird degree north latitude; thence due north to the most easterly point of said Fort Stanton reduced military reservation; thence along the north-eastern boundary of said military reservation to the place of beginning.

U. S. GRANT.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, May 19, 1832. In lieu of Executive order dated October 20, 1875, setting apart certain lands in New Mexico as a reservation for the Mescalero Apaches, which order is hereby eancelled, it is hereby ordered that there be withdrawn from sale or other disposition, and set apart for the use of the said Mescalero Apaches and such other Indians as the Department may see fit to locate thefeon, the tract of country in New Mexico bounded as follows:

Beginuing at the north-east corner of township 12 south, range 16 east of the principal meridian in New Mexico; thence west along the north boundary of township 12 south, ranges 16, 15, 14, and 13 east, to the south-east corner of township 11 south, range 12 east; thence north along the east boundary of said township to the second correction line south; thence west along said correction line to the north-west corner of township 11 south, range 11 east; thence south along the range line between ranges 10 and 11 east to the south-west corner of township 12 south, range 11 east; thence east along the south boundary of said township to the south-east corner thereof; thence south along the range line between ranges 11 and 12 east to the thiry-third degree of north latitude as established and marked on the ground by First Lieut. L. H. Walker, Fifteenth Infantry, United States Army, in compliance with Special Orders No. 100, series of 1875, Headquarters District of New Mexico; thence east along said thirty-third degree of north latitude to its intersection with the range line between rauges 16 and 17 east; thence north along said range line to the place of beginning.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, March 24, 1883. In lieu of Executive order dated May 19, 1882, setting apart certain lavds in New Mexico as a reservation for the Mescalero Apaches, which order is hereby cancelled, it

1 Report of Indian Commissioner, 1886, pp. 347, 348.

is hereby ordered that there be withdrawn from sale or other disposition and set apart for the use of the said Mescalero Apaches and such other Indians as the Secretary of the Interior may see fit to locate thereon, the tract of country in New Mexico bounded as follows:

Beginning at the north-east corner of township 12 south, range 16 east of the principal meridian in New Mexico; thence west along the north boundary of township 12 south, ranges 16, 15, 14, and 13 east to the south-east corner of township 11 south, range 12 east; thence north along the east boundary of said township to the second correction line south; thence west along said correction line 12 miles; thence south 12 miles; thence east 6 miles; thence south to the thirty-third degree of north latitude, as established and marked on the ground by First Lieut. L. H. Walker, Fifteenth Infantry, U. S. A., in compliance with Special Orders No. 100, series of 1875, Headquarters District of New Mexico; thence east along said thirty-third degree of north latitude to its intersection with the range line between ranges 16 and 17 east; thence north along said range line to place of beginning.

CHESTER A. ARTHUR. Gila Reserve.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, OFFICE OF INDIAN AFFAIRS,

May 14, 1860. Sır: This office having signified to Agent Steck its approbation of the establishment of a reservation in New Mexico for the Gila Apaches, including the Miembres, Mogol. ton, and Chilicayia bands of that tribe, he suggests the following boundaries for the same, viz: “Commencing at Santa Lucia Spring and running north 15 miles, thence west 15 miles, thence south 15 miles, thence east 15 miles to the place of beginning."

Agent Steck has been directed to have the boundaries of the reserve, as indicated by him, run out and marked, and to give notice thereof to the surveyor-general of New Mexico.

I have, therefore, to request that you will give instructions to that officer to respect the said reserve when in the progress of the public surveys he comes to connect them with the external boundaries of said reserve. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. B. GREENWOOD,

Commissioner. Hon. JOSEPH S. WILSON,

Commissioner General Land Office.

(Occupied for a short time only, and then abandoned. See Land Office Report for 1872, p. 123.)

Hot Springs Reserve.?

EXECUTIVE MANSION, April 9, 1874. It is hereby ordered that the following described tract of country in the Territory of New Mexico be, and the same is hereby, withdrawn from sale and reserved for the use and occupation of such Indians as the Secretary of the Interior may see fit to locate thereon, as indicated in this diagram, viz:

Beginning at the ruins of an ancient pueblo in the valley of the Cañada Alamosa River, about 7 miles above the present town of Cañada Alamosa, and running thence due east 10 miles; thence due north 25 miles; thence due west 30 miles; thence due south 25 miles; thence due east 20 miles to the place of beginning.

U. S. GRANT,

EXECUTIVE MANSION, December 21, 1875. It is hereby ordered that the tract of country in the Territory of New Mexico, lying within the following described boundaries, viz, beginning at a point on the east side

1 Report of Indian Commissioner, 1886, p. 348.

of the Cañada about 1,000 yards directly east of the ruins of an ancient pueblo in the valley of Cañada Alamosa River, about 7 miles above the town of Cañada Alamosa, and running thence due north 20 miles to a point; thence due west 20 miles to a point; thence due south 35 miles to a point; thence due east 20 miles to a point due south of the place of beginning; thepce due north to the place of beginning, be, and the same is hereby, withdrawn from sale and set apart for the use and occupancy of the Southern Apache and such other Indians as it may be determined to place thereon, to be known as the “ Hot Springs Indian Reservation;" and all that portion of country set apart by Executive order of April 9, 1874, not embraced within the limits of the above described tract of country, is hereby restored to the public domain.

U. S. GRANT.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, August 25, 1877. It is hereby ordered that the order of December 21, 1875, setting apart the following lands in New Mexico as the Hot Springs Indian Reservation, viz, beginning at a point on the east side of the Cañada, about 1,000 yards directly east of the ruins of an ancient pueblo in the valley of Cañada Alamosa River, about 7 miles above the town of Cañada Alamosa, and running the ce ue nort 20 les to a point; thence due west' 20 miles to a point; thence due south 35 miles to a point; thence due east 20 miles to a point due south of the place of beginning; thence due north to the place of beginning, be, and the same is hereby, cancelled, and said lands are restored to the public domain.

R. B. HAYES. Jicarilla Apache Reserve."

EXECUTIVE MANSION, March 25, 1874. It is hereby ordered that the following described tract of country in the Territory of New Mexico, set apart as a reservation for the Jicarilla Apache Indians by the first article of an agreement concluded with the said Indians December 10, 1873, subject to the action of Congress, be, and the same is hereby, withdrawn from sale and settlement, viz: Commencing at a point where the head waters of the San Juan River crosses the southern boundary of the Territory of Colorado, following the course of said river until it intersects the eastern boundary of the Navajo Reservation; thence due north along said eastern boundary of the Navajo Reservation to where it intersects the southern boundary line of the Territory of Colorado; thence due east along the said southern boundary of the Territory of Colorado to the place of beginning.

U. S. GRANT.

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EXECUTIVE MANSION, July 18, 1876. It is hereby ordered that the order of March 25, 1874, setting apart the following described lands in the Territory of New Mexico, as a reservation for the Jicarilla Apache Indians, viz, commencing at a point where the head waters of San Juan River crosses the southern boundary of the Territory of Colorado, following the course of said river until it intersects the eastern boundary of the Navajo Reservation; thence due north along said eastern boundary of the Navajo Reservation to where it intersects the southern boundary line of the Territory of Colorado; thence due east along the said southern boundary of the Territory of Colorado, to the place of beginning, be, and the same is hereby, cancelled, and said lands are restored to the public domain.

U. S. GRANT.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, September 21, 1880. It is bereby ordered that the tract of country in the Territory of New Mexico, lying within the following described boundaries, viz, beginning at the south-west corner of the Mexican grant known as the “Tierra Amarilla grant,” as surveyed by Sawyer and

Report of Indian Commissioner, 1886, p. 349.

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