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nicipal Assembly the same rule made applicable by the Constitution of the State (Sec. 7, Art. Ill) to members of the State Legislature, by prohibiting them during the term for which they were elected from being eligible for appointment to any other office under the city. It also prohibits them from being contractors with or an employee of the city. The present bill nullifies this provision by adding a clause which permits any member of the Municipal Assembly to avoid the provisions of the section by simply resigning membership in the said Assembly. All the considerations which made it wise to enact the original section make it unwise now to nullify it by this amendment. .

THEODORE ROOSEVELT

CERTIFICATION OF THE NECESSITY OF THE PASSAGE OF ASSEMBLY BILL No. 245i, AMENDING THE LAW REGULATING ENROLLMENT

State Of New York

Executive Chamber

To The Legislature:

It appearing to my satisfaction that the public interest requires it;

Therefore In accordance with the provisions of section fifteen of article three of the Constitution and by virtue of the authority thereby conferred upon me, I do hereby certify to the necessity of the immediate passage of Assembly bill number 245i (Introductory number ii06) entitled "An Act to amend chapter one hundred I

and seventy-nine of the general laws of eighteen hundred and ninety-eight, entitled 'An Act in relation to enrollment for political parties, primary elections, conventions, and political committees,' relative to the enrollment for and holding of primary elections ".

Given under my hand and the Privy Seal of the State at the Capitol in the city of Albany this [l S] twenty-seventh day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninetynine.

THEODORE ROOSEVELT

By the Governor:

Wm. J. Youngs

Secretary to the Governor

CERTIFICATION OF THE NECESSITY OF THE PASSAGE OF SENATE BILL No. i496, TO ESTABLISH A SEPARATE DEPARTMENT OF ELECTIONS IN NEW YORK CITY

State Of New York

Executive Chamber

To The Legislature:

It appearing to my satisfaction that the public interest requires it;

Therefore In accordance with the provisions of section fifteen of article three of the Constitution and by virtue of the authority thereby conferred upon me, I do hereby certify to the necessity of the immediate passage of Senate bill number i496 (being Assembly reprint number i697) entitled "An Act to establish a separate department of elections in the city of New York ".

Given under my hand and the Privy Seal of the State at the Capitol in the city of Albany this [l S] twenty-seventh day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninetynine.

THEODORE ROOSEVELT

By the Governor:

Wm. J. Youngs

Secretary to the Governor

CERTIFICATION OF THE NECESSITY OF THE PASSAGE OF SENATE BILL No. i399, RELATING TO CITIES OF THE SECOND CLASS

State Of New York

Executive Chamber

To The Legislature:

It appearing to my satisfaction that the public interest requires it;

Therefore In accordance with the provisions of section fifteen of article three of the Constitution and by virtue of the authority thereby conferred upon me, I do hereby certify to the necessity of the immediate passage of Senate bill number i399 (introductory number 630 and Assembly reprint number 2449) entitled "An Act to amend chapter one hundred and eighty-two of the laws of eighteen hundred and ninety-eight entitled 'An Act for the government of cities of the second class' ".

Given under my hand and the Privy Seal of the State at the Capitol in the city of Albany this [l S] twenty-seventh day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninetynine.

THEODORE ROOSEVELT

By the Governor:

Wm. J. Youngs

Secretary to the Governor

MEMORANDUM APPROVING FINDINGS OF THE COURT OF INQUIRY IN THE CASES OF OFFICERS OF THE SEVENTY-FIRST REGIMENT

State Of New York

Executive Chamber

Albany, N. Y., April 27, i899

At the outset, I desire in the strongest manner to commend the admirable work done by the Court of Inquiry. It would be impossible to speak in too high terms of their fearlessness and impartiality. The senior field officers of the Seventy-first discredited their regiment, and therefore by just so much discredited the American volunteer service, by their actions at San Juan; but it must be remembered to the lasting credit of the American volunteers that it was left to three of their number to punish this wrongdoing when the regular army had signally failed to punish it. If the Seventy-first regiment had heen treated as the Sixth Massachusetts was treated under similar circumstances in Porto Rico, that is, if the offending field officers had been at once removed, the whole trouble would have been avoided and a very great service conferred upon both the army and the regiment itself. The trouble in the Seventy-first was a matter of common notoriety in the Santiago army, and after General Kent made his report there was no excuse whatever for failure to take decisive action.

In any war where large numbers of volunteers are called into the service, the greatest danger to the country at large lies in the fact that very many men by the exertion of various influences get commissions which they are wholly incompetent to bear. They eagerly grasp at high regimental rank when they are utterly without the training necessary to the proper performance of their duties, or else, though very possibly men of amiable character in their domestic relations and of exemplary conduct as regards their civic and social duties, yet lack the fighting edge without which no man is competent to do good soldier's work. There is absolutely no way to prevent men of this stamp from obtaining positions in which they may jeopardize the welfare of the country and disgrace the country's flag, save by making them understand that they will be held to a sharp and rigid accountability for failure to perform aright the arduous and difficult duties of the vitally responsible positions which they have sought with such thoughtless eagerness. The higher the man's rank is, the greater is his chance to .win distinction and do honorable work, and the greater also must be the blame that rightly attaches to him if he is guilty of failure or shortcoming; especially

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