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defects beyond those indicated above will be found. In any event it is highly desirable that the principle which this law seeks to establish should be really established and that the nominal purpose of the eight-hour law should be in fact fulfilled.

I accordingly sign the bill.

THEODORE ROOSEVELT

VETO OF ITEM IN THE SUPPLY BILL —APPROPRIATION FOR REARRANGING LIGHTING OF SENATE CHAMBER

State Of New York

Executive Chamber

Albany, May i2, i899

Statement of item of appropriation objected to and not approved, contained in Assembly bill number 2454, entitled "An Act making appropriations for certain expenses of government and supplying deficiencies in former appropriations " Not approved

The following item contained in Assembly bill number 2454, entitled "An Act making appropriations for certain expenses of government and supplying deficiencies in former appropriations ", is objected to and not approved for the reasons hereinafter stated:

"For the Superintendent of Public Buildings for rearranging the lighting of the Senate Chamber, five thousand dollars or so much thereof as may be necessary, to be expended under the direction of the Capitol Commissioner and upon the request and with the approval of the finance committee of the Senate".

I am informed that the amount appropriated is insufficient for the purpose indicated. The Superintendent of Public Buildings reports that it would take in the neighborhood of nine thousand dollars, and it is not in accordance with sound public policy to incur a deficiency in such a matter. I think the work should not be begun unless it can be completed.

THEODORE ROOSEVELT

PROCLAMATION ON THE DEATH OF EX-GOVERNOR ROSWELL P. FLOWER

State Of New York

Executive Chamber On May thirteenth the people of the State of New York learned with profound sorrow of the death of

Roswell P. Flower

At one time Governor of this State, he was known to all the people as, a conscientious and painstaking Executive whose labors were devoted to what he deemed the best interests of all our citizens. During his long and conspicuous career he was brought in contact with very many private enterprises in which his cool and discriminating judgment and insistent and careful examination of detail rendered him peculiarly fitted for the arduous services which he rendered to his associates. In his private life he was beloved by all who knew him. In his business enterprises he was esteemed for his integrity and worth. In his public capacity he was honored as a conscientious and painstaking Executive. In every station which he was called upon to fill he was esteemed for his fidelity to the trust imposed upon him.

It would seem proper therefore that the Executive of the State, in the absence of the Legislature, should express on behalf of the people the respect due to his public spirit and well-known integrity.

Now therefore I, Theodore Roosevelt, Governor of the State of New York, as a fitting tribute to the respect, character and public services of the deceased, do request that the flags upon all the public buildings of the State, including the armories and arsenals, be displayed at half-mast up to and including Wednesday the seventeenth day of May, and that the citizens of the State unite in appropriate remarks of respect to his memory.

Given under my hand and the .Privy Seal of the State at the Capitol in the city of Albany this [l S] fourteenth day of May in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-nine.

THEODORE ROOSEVELT

By the Governor:

Wm. J. Youngs

Secretary to the Governor

LETTER RELATING TO THE PROPOSED HUDSON RIVER BRIDGE AT TROY

State Of New York

Executive Chamber

Albany, May i7, i899

To Col. John N. Partridge, Superintendent of Public Works, Albany, N. Y.:

Sir: The mayor of Watervliet and other representatives of that city have been down to see me in reference to Senator Douglas' bill to permit the construction of a bridge over the Hudson river by the Albany Railway. Their plea is now that unless they can satisfy you that they can put up a bridge that will not in any way be an obstruction to navigation, they cannot build it, and that you have complete power to veto the project, but that they would like to have the chance of satisfying you that they can put up a bridge which will in nowise obstruct navigation. I confess I am doubtful whether such a bridge can be built, although I suppose a suspension bridge would not obstruct canal navigation. They seem to desire that the steamboat landings should all be south of the present bridge in any event.

Will you let me know whether you think it is safe and proper for me to sign the bill and then leave to you the responsibility of deciding whether or not the bridge which they ultimately propose can with due regard to the commercial interests of the State be put across the river? Please answer me at once.

Yours very truly,

THEODORE ROOSEVELT

PROCLAMATION CONVENING THE LEGISLATURE IN EXTRAORDINARY SESSION

State Of New York

Executive Chamber

Pursuant to the power vested in me by section 4 of article IV of the Constitution, I hereby convene the Legislature in Extraordinary Session at the Capitol in the city of Albany on Monday the twenty-second day of May. i899, at 8 o'clock in the evening.

Given under my hand and the Privy Seal of the State at the Capitol in the city of Albany this [l S] seventeenth day of May in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-nine.

THEODORE ROOSEVELT

By the Governor:

Wm. J. Youngs

Secretary to the Governor

MESSAGE ADVISING ACTION IN THE MATTER OF THE TAXATION OF PUBLIC FRANCHISES

State Of New York

Executive Chamber

Albany, May 22, i899

To The Legislature:

I have called you together in Extraordinary Session for the purpose of considering the subject of the taxation of franchises.

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