Birmingham Medical Review, Volume 56

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Page 445 - A Text-Book of Diseases of Women. By BARTON COOKE HIRST, MD, Professor of Obstetrics, University of Pennsylvania ; Gynecologist to the Howard, the Orthopedic, and the Philadelphia Hospitals.
Page 442 - I should estimate the extent of infection by the milk and flesh of tuberculous cattle and the butter made of their milk as hardly greater than that of hereditary transmission, and I therefore do not deem it advisable to take any measures against it.
Page 439 - We have very carefully compared the disease thus set up in the bovine animal by material of human origin with that set up in the bovine animal by material of bovine origin, and so far we have found the one, both in its broad general features and in its finer histological details, to be identical with the other.
Page 449 - Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine, etc. With an Introductory Note by JOHN H. MUSSER, MD, Professor of Clinical Medicine, University of Pennsylvania. I2mo of 247 pages.
Page 442 - Among 933 cases of tuberculosis in children at the Emperor and Empress Frederick's Hospital for Children, Baginsky never found tuberculosis of the intestine without simultaneous disease of the lungs and the bronchial glands.
Page 711 - The increased and adequately maintained blood-supply to the kidney established by Edebohls's operation leads, most probably, to gradual absorption of the interstitial or intertubular inflammatory products and exudates, thus freeing the tubules and glomeruli from external compression, constriction, and distortion, and permitting the reestablishment in them of a normal circulation. The result of this improved circulation in and between the tubules and glomeruli is the regenerative production of new...
Page 439 - We have up to the present made use, in the above inquiry, of more than twenty different " strains " of tuberculous material of human origin, that is to say, of material taken from more than twenty cases of tuberculous disease in human beings, including sputum from phthisical patients, and the diseased parts of the lungs in pulmonary tuberculosis, mesenteric glands in primary abdominal tuberculosis, tuberculous bronchial and cervical glands...
Page 439 - ... strains, the bovine animal into which the tuberculous material was first introduced was affected to a less extent. The tuberculous disease was either limited to the spot where the material was introduced (this occurred, however, in two instances only, and these at the very beginning of...
Page 557 - ... useful for the prevention of disease and in the treatment of the sick. Edited by Solomon Solis Cohen, AM, MD...
Page 711 - ... the necessary result must be the formation on the most extensive scale possible of new vascular connections between the kidney and the fatty capsule embracing it. The fibrous capsule proper forms an almost impenetrable barrier to the passage of blood vessels between the kidney and its fatty capsule, as we have abundant opportunity to verify at operations upon the kidneys.

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