School Buildings and Grounds in Nebraska

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Department of Public Instruction, 1902 - 278 pages
 

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Page 202 - The residents of the subdistricts of Kingsville Township which have adopted this plan would deem it a retrogression to go back to the old subdistrict plan. It has given the school system of Kingsville an individuality which makes it unique and progressive. Pupils from every part of the township enjoy a graded school education, whether they live in the most remote corner of the township or at the very doors of the central school. The line between the country-bred and the village-bred youth is blotted...
Page 205 - The salaries are higher ; the health of the pupils is preserved, because they are not compelled to walk to school in slush, snow and rain, to sit with damp, and perhaps wet feet, in ill-ventilated buildings. Nor is there any lounging by the wayside. As the use of indecent and obscene language is prohibited in the wagons, all opportunities for quarreling or improper conduct on the way to and from school are removed.
Page 189 - ... distribution of mail throughout the whole township daily. 13. Finally, by transportation the farm again as of old becomes the ideal place in which to bring up children, enabling them to secure the advantages of centers of population and spend their evenings and holiday time in the country in contact with nature and plenty of work, instead of idly loafing about town.
Page 229 - Boone Box Butte Boyd Brown Buffalo Burt Butler Cass Cedar • Chase Cherry Cheyenne...
Page 85 - If children are daily surrounded by those influences that elevate them, that make them clean and well-ordered, that make them love flowers, and pictures, and proper decorations, they at last reach that degree of culture where nothing else will please them: When they grow up and have homes of their own, they must have them clean, neat, bright with pictures, and fringed with shade trees and...
Page 175 - But the school needed a room lighted in all parts, as nearly equally as possible and with a constant supply of fresh air, heated properly. It was gradually discovered that the room of the dwelling-house was poorly adapted for school purposes. Some pupils got too little light and became near-sighted by holding their books too close to their eyes, some came to have weak eyes by having too much light ; for the glare of a page on which the sunlight falls is sufficient to produce partial blindness. Even...
Page 179 - The great purpose of learning to know printed language, to become eye-minded instead of ear-minded — to gain besides one's colloquial vocabulary also a vocabulary of science and literature and philosophy — to become able to understand and use technical language — all these things came then and come now to the gifted youth without the improvements in hygiene that we clamor for. Abraham Lincoln read by the firelight of the blazing hearth and fed his mighty mind. It is true that the average of...
Page 88 - ... hardiest and most likely to grow. There is no district so poor and bare that enough plants cannot be secured, without money, for the school yard. You will find them in the woods, in old yards, along the fences. It is little matter if no one knows their names. What is handsomer than a tangled fence-row ? Scatter in a few trees along the fence and about the buildings.
Page 205 - This mingling of the pupils from the subdistricts and the village has had a deepening and broadening influence upon the former, without any disadvantage to the latter. With the grading of the school and the larger number of pupils, have come teachers of a more highly educated class. Higher branches of study are taught, the teachers are more conversant with the needs of their profession. The salaries are...
Page 183 - ... at best a makeshift and should be discontinued whenever the state is sufficiently advanced in education to warrant its discontinuance. There should be a limit to the length of time a person can serve as an apprentice in the vocation of teaching. 14. We believe that the standards for school architecture, including the proper seating, heating, lighting, ventilation, and ornamentation of school buildings, should be as definite as the standards for teaching. The law should fix the dimensions and...

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