A Week in the White House with Theodore Roosevelt: A Study of the President at the Nation's Business

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G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1908 - 153 pages

William Bayard Hale was a controversial American journalist who spent a week at Teddy Roosevelt's White House. In this sympathetic but fascinating look at Theodore Roosevelt at work, we hear him speak on matters great and small in his own words. 

Hale describes a typical White House day demonstrating the demands on the president's time and energies. We read Roosevelt talking about Lincoln and Washington. Roosevelt even holds forth on Roosevelt, acknowledging his love of the the most powerful office in the land. 

This slim volume is a must read for anyone interested in Roosevelt. It is available for the first time as an affordable, well-formatted book for e-readers. 

Be sure to LOOK INSIDE or download a sample.

 

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Page 10 - MASTER of human destinies am I! Fame, love, and fortune on my footsteps wait. Cities and fields I walk; I penetrate Deserts and seas remote, and passing by Hovel and mart and palace — soon or late I knock unbidden once at every gate! If sleeping, wake — if feasting, rise before I turn away. It is the hour of fate, . And...
Page 10 - Master of human destinies am I: Fame, love and fortune on my footsteps wait, Cities and fields I walk ! I penetrate Deserts and seas remote, and passing by Hovel and mart and palace — soon or late I knock unbidden once at every gate. If sleeping, wake — if feasting, rise before I turn away, it is the hour of fate...
Page 44 - You don't smile with Mr. Roosevelt; you shout with laughter with him, and then you shout again while he tries to cork up more laugh and sputters ; 'Come gentlemen, let us be serious'.
Page 10 - If sleeping, wake: if feasting, rise before I turn away. It is the hour of fate, And they who follow me reach every state Mortals desire, and conquer every foe Save death: but those who doubt or hesitate, Condemned to failure, penury and woe, Seek me in vain and uselessly implore. I answer not, and I return no more!
Page 125 - ... at all, — nor do they so much as think of it, their minds being intent upon that employ they are in, either the delight or diligence of the soul getting the mastery over all other desires. Epaminondas is reported wittily to have said of a good man that died about the time of the battle of Leuctra, How came he to have so much leisure as to die, when there was so much business stirring ? It may truly be asked concerning a man that is either of public employ or a scholar, What time can such a...
Page 15 - ... condition to-day ; his face clear, his weight I should say wellnigh a stone less than was his habit back of a year ago. Look at him as he stands and you will see that he is rigid as a soldier on parade. His chin is in, his chest out. The line from the back of his head falls straight as a plumb-line to his heels. Never for a moment, while he is on his feet, does that line so much as waver, that neck unbend.
Page 16 - ... from the back of his head falls straight as a plumb-line to his heels. Never for a moment, while he is on his feet, does that line so much as waver, that neck unbend. It is a pillar of steel. Remember that steel pillar. Remember it when he laughs, as he will do a hundred times a...
Page 26 - ... explosions of the President's speech. Dr. Hale, who cannot, of course, reproduce the entire conversation, prints a number of different openings, as Mr. Roosevelt sees his visitor, advances upon him, and wrings his hand. ' Senator, I — am GLAD to see you ! Senator, this is a — VERY great pleasure ! Your daughters ? I am, indeed, pleased to have this visit from you ! How DARE you introduce yourself to me ? A great pleasure— a VERY— GREAT pleasure...
Page 115 - ... dynamo. Once we all believed in a beautiful law known as that of the conservation of energy. No force, so went the dream, was lost. It was only transformed; it underwent metamorphosis; the sum of energy in the universe was always the same. It was the discovery of radium and the radioactive substances which wrought the discomfiture of that law. It is Mr. Roosevelt who discredits it entirely. He never knows that virtue has gone out of him. He radiates from morning until night, and he is nevertheless...

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