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that we issue at so comparatively trifling a cost so valuable an aid to our work as a National Society. As our official organ, it keeps us in touch, all through the year, throughout one great and widespread organization.

A well known editress said to the Chairman of this Committee when asked for help and suggestions—"Oh you must have your Magazine!"

Your Committee feel that our AMERICAN MONTHLY MAGAZINE can be of great service not only to this Society, but far beyond our membership, if we as an organization will make it such. It will take time, effort and means to establish our Magazine as a recognized power for good throughout the landman influence that will blend historic facts and the highest principles of patriotism. But the time seems ripe for this. Your Committee therefore suggest:

First. That the members of the Eighth Continental Congress, with the alternates and visiting members of our Society present, be asked to state how many of them will take the Magazine for the ensuing year.

Second. That they be also asked what part of the Magazine they prefer. How many read with most interest the historical articles? How many the reports of Chapter work? How many the minutes of the Congress and National Board meetings.

Third. That club rules be given to a number of subscribers sending in subscriptions through any one Chapter.

Fourth. That each report of Chapter work shall be allowed a stated amount of space in the Magazine in order give the same opportunity to all Chapters, and avoid delay in publishing such reports.

Fifth. That the number of pages of each issue and all details be left to the discretion of the Editress, Business Manager and a Magazine Committee.

Sixth. That this Congress, in view of the importance of the effort to make our Magazine of greater interest and value, one that shall tell upon the future of our land, shall vote the same five thousand dollars for carrying it on during the coming year. This sum, as will be noticed, is not greatly in excess of the present net cost of publication, with the salaries of the Editress and Business Manager. What may remain after meeting such expenses should be used to advance the interests of the Magazine, at the discretion of a competent Magazine Committee.

Your Committee believe, after careful consideration, that these methods would place the whole matter upon a broader and more business-like basis than heretofore, and tend to success.

Respectfully submitted,
(Signed)

MARY ISABELLA FORSYTH,
ELLEN R. JEWETT,
VARY C. O'NEIL,
E. H. B. ROBERTS,
ANITA NEWCOMB McGEE.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. The question is on the motion that was before the house, that was postponed until after the reading of this report. The motion will be read first.

READER. The original motion from Mrs. Raoul, of Georgia, was, “I move that the Magazine be discontinued at once when the subscription is not paid.” Mrs. Ballinger's amendment, “I move to amend by inserting the words "All subscribers who are three months in arrears shall be discontinued.”

Miss Pike. I moved an amendment that it be six months instead of three.

(Cries of "Oh!" "Oh!")

PRESIDENT GENERAL. The question is on the motion to amend the original motion; will you read the substitute?

READER. “I move to amend by inserting the words 'A11 subscribers who are three months in arrears shall be discontinued.'”

PRESIDENT GENERAL. This is really a substitute amendment.

Miss PIKE. I move that the time be six months instead of three.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. I heard no second.
Numerously seconded.

Mrs. FOWLER. We don't wish to discontinue the subscribers; or they would not be present at any future Congress.

A MEMBER. Is it possible that any Daughter of the American Revolution cannot in three months get one dollar for subscription?

PRESIDENT GENERAL. It is moved and seconded to amend the amendment by inserting the word “six” for “three"that the time be six months instead of three. All those in favor please say “aye;" opposed, “no;" the motion seems to be lost. The question recurs—interrupted.)

Mrs. BALLINGER. May I ask if it would be more agreeable to say subscriptions instead of subscribers ? [Laughter]

PRESIDENT GENERAL. The question is on the amendment.

READER. "I move to amend the motion by inserting the words 'All subscribers who are three months in arrears shall be discontinued.'" PRESIDENT GENERAL. If there are no objections, the word

"subscriptions” will be substituted for the word "subscriber.” As I hear no objection, it will be carried out.

READER. It therefore reads “All subscriptions three months in arrears shall be discontinued.”

PRESIDENT GENERAL. Are you ready for the question? (Cries of “Question!") Those in favor say “aye;" opposed, “no." The motion seems to be lost.

Mrs. BALLINGER. I think that was carried.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. Division is called for. All in favor rise and remain standing until counted. All those opposed rise and remain standing until counted.

READER. The original motion is that the Magazine be discontinued at once when the subscription is not paid. Amended it reads "All subscriptions three months in arrears shall be discontinued."

Mrs. BALLINGER. We have voted on that Madam President, and we had an overwhelming vote.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. Your amendment was a substitute for the main motion.

MEMBER. It must be customary for all such questions to be decided by the business manager of every magazine or newspaper. I therefore move it to be left to the Business Manager.

SEVERAL MEMBERS. We did not hear that motion.

Mrs. TERRY. Is not there an original motion before the house?

PRESIDENT GENERAL. The substitute motion is before the house. Mrs. Ballinger questions the decision of the Chair in regard to it.

Mrs. BALLINGER. I have been informed that I am wrong. I am told now it is the amendment to my amendment we voted on. This is a substitute for the original motion.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. It has not yet been carried. It has been substituted and now it is before the house to be acted upon.

MEMBER. Is the substitute open to amendment?

PRESIDENT GENERAL. There is a motion now before the house to refer it to a committee.

SAME MEMBER. Is that cpen to amendment ?

PRESIDENT GENERAL. It is of higher rank than an amendment.

SAME MEMBER. Because I would like to suggest that subscribers be notified one month in advance if possible.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. The question is on the motion to refer to a committee.

Miss PIKE. I second that motion.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. It is before the house; are you ready for the question ? All those in favor say "aye;" opposed, “no;" the motion seems to be lost. The question recurs to the substitute to the main motion.

READER. "I move that all subscriptions three months in arrears shall be discontinued.”

PRESIDENT GENERAL. Are you ready for the question ? (Cries of "Question !") All in favor will please say "aye;" contrary, "no." It seems to be carried. The report of the Magazine Committee is before the house.

Mrs. RAOUL. Would it be in order to offer another motion? I would like to move that we raise the sum from $1 to $2 a year, and render no assistance from the treasury, so that our Magazine will stand on its own merit.

Seconded.
PRESIDENT GENERAL. Is that a motion, Mrs. Raoul ?
Mrs. RAOUL. That is a motion.
PRESIDENT GENERAL. Will you send it up, please?
PRESIDENT GENERAL. It has been moved and seconded-

READER. Mrs. Raoul: "I move that the subscription to the Magazine be raised from one to two dollars, and no assistance be given from the treasury.”

Mrs. GREEN. Has that been seconded ?
PRESIDENT GENERAL. That was seconded.

Mrs. Lockwood. I don't think that the lady quite knows what that means. You are going to make a debt for the Society, and fix it so that nobody else will pay it. It is a very nice thing to do if you could carry it out, but you could not ask such a thing as that, when more than half the expense comes from the official work. Who is going to pay for that? You can never do it in that way.

Mrs. GREEN. It seems to me that that raise of $1 a year is

a good thing, and I believe that the majority of the women here who take the Magazine at Si a year would increase their subscription to $2 a year willingly; and if those who are in arrears at Si a year are dropped out, I believe that the Magazine could be built up on $2 a year.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. The motion is beiore the house; are you ready for the question?

Mrs. TORRANCE, of Minnesota. "There is that withholdeth more that is meet but it tendeth to poverty.” I think it would be a great mistake to kill our Magazine at this period of our history, and I think any such action as this would completely kill it. With all the good magazines we have in the country at the present time, and with the funds which we have for the furtherance of our Society, I think we could not use them to better advantage than to furthering our Magazine. [Applause.) I should very much deprecate such action on the part of this Congress, and from the expressions I hear about me I know that there are others who feel as I do.

Mrs. Lyons. I move to lay this motion on the table. Seconded.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. It is moved and seconded that we lay this motion on the table. All in favor will say "aye;" opposed, "no." It is carried.

Mrs. DRAPER. I move that we adjourn.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. Before we adjourn, I would like to ask that the audience will listen to some notices by the Reader. Miss Forsyth's report is before the house—what is the pleasure of the house?

Mrs. Gist. I move its acceptance.

Mrs. DRAPER. Was not my motion prior? I thought a motion to adjourn was in order.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. It is in order.

Mrs. DRAPER. It seemed to me that the report was valuable, and it is now half past ten.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. A motion to adjourn is not debatable. It is moved and seconded to adjourn, but you are asked to wait until you listen to the notices the Reader has in her hand.

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