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CHAIRMAN. The previous question has been moved. Shall the main question be put? All in favor will please say "aye;" contrary, "no." The motion is carried.

READER. The question is now upon this resolution, ladies; previous question has been called, and this is what you are going to vote on.

READER. "I move that all printed, written or typewritten matter, distributed on the floor of this House, be signed by the author.”

CHAIRMAN. All in favor of this motion will please say "aye;" contrary, "no." The motion is carried. Mrs. Walworth asks for a moment to address the house.

Mrs. WALWORTH. I have the pleasure of saying that Mrs. Henry Mallory, of Brooklyn, the Vice-President of the George Washington Memorial Association is in the house, and has presented on behalf of that association $25 to the Continental Hall Fund, in token of the sympathy with the work we are doing for the university.

CHAIRMAN. The next report is from the Chairman of the Committee on Revolutionary Relics, Mrs. Lindsay.

Mrs. LINDSAY :

Madam President and Members of the Eighth Continental Congress: Your Committee on Revolutionary Relics submit this as their annual report:

The work of collecting relics has gone steadily on with the most gratifying success. Among them, we call attention to a piece of wood from the house of John Hancock, who signed his name to the Declaration of Independence in letters so large that he was moved to say that King George could read it without spectacles. Immediately following the receipt of this relic, you were presented with the coat worn by Charles Carroll, of Carrollton, who when he attached the name of his home to his signature to the Declaration, said there could be no doubt in the mind of the British King as to where he could be found.

The list of additional relics is as follows:

Three Photographic Views from Lexington, Massachusetts; one of the old belfry, from which the alarm was given by Paul Revere to the Minute Men; another is a view of the Village Green where the battle was fought, and the third is of the monument reared to the patriots who fell in April, 1775. These views are framed in some of the wood of the old belíry, and were presented by the Lexington Chapter, through their Regent, Mrs. Sarah Bowman Van Ness. (You will remember that this was presented at the last Congress.)

A Letter from Jane M. Morton, aged 94, a daughter of a revolutionary soldier. West Salisbury, Vermont. Ethan Allen Chapter.

A Letter from Mrs. Elmira Bannister Mason, the daughter of a revolutionary soldier. Poultney, Vermont, Rutland County.

A Letter from Mary Wells Burdick, Claremont, New Hampshire, aged 94; the daughter of a revolutionary soldier.

A Letter referring to Mrs. Caroline Reed Stone, of Pirre Island, Minnesota, a daughter of a revolutionary soldier.

A Letter referring to Mrs. Margaret W. Browns, of Topeka, Kansas, aged 95, a daughter of a revolutionary soldier.

A Letter from Rebecca Pratt Chelsea, Massachusetts, a daughter of a revolutionary soldier.

A Letter from Mrs. Corelli C. W. Simpson, Regent of the Frances Dighton Williams Chapter, Bangor, Maine, referring to Mrs. Phidelis C. Lowell, aged 83, a daughter of Robert Coffren, a revolutionary soldier.

A Letter referring to Mrs. Nancy Ray, Rochester, New York, aged for years, a daughter of a revolutionary soldier.

A Letter referring to three sisters of the Valley Forge Chapter, Mrs. Lucinda Valentine, Mrs. Catharine Bowden, the other name not given, daughters of Jabez Rockwell, a revolutionary soldier.

A Letter referring to Miss Harriet Hollister, Talcottville, Connecticut, a daughter of a revolutionary soldier.

A Letter from Mrs. M. C. P. Bennett, Richmond, Virginia, a daughter of a revolutionary soldier.

A Letter referring to Miss Pamela Banks, of Greenfield Hill, Connecticut, aged 92, a daughter of a revolutionary soldier.

A Letter from Mrs. Emily Allen, of South Lee, New Hampshire, 77 years of age, the daughter of a revolutionary soldier.

A Letter from the following members of Old South Chapter, Boston, Massachusetts, daughters of revolutionary soldiers:

Eunice Russ Ames Davis, aged 98. First president and oldest living member of the Anti-Slavery Society, Boston. Jane Brown Marshal.

Sophronia Fletcher, M. D., aged 92. First woman physician at Holyoke College. First class, New England Female Medical College.

Joanna W. B. Fletcher, aged 87.
Adeline Boulding.
C. N. Perry, aged 90.

A Letter from Mrs. Anna Morse, late Chapter Regent at Cherry Valley, New York, and daughter of a revolutionary soldier; sent through Mrs. Caroline C. Little, Regent of Irondequoit Chapter, Rochester, New York.

A Letter referring to Mrs. Elmira Montague Hitchcock Hall, daughter of a revolutionary soldier; from Mrs. Horace H. Dyer, Regent Ann Story Chapter, Rutland, Vermont.

Wood from Old Hancock House, Boston, Massachusetts, built 1737, destroyed 1863. Presented to the National Society by Mrs. Cornelia W. (Lincoln) Davol, Historian Quequechan Chapter, Fall River, Massachusetts. (Let me say that this is our most beautifully mounted relic.)

A Coat, worn by Charles Carroll, of Carrollton, when he signed the Declaration of Independence, presented by Mr. Tracy L. Jeffords, through Mrs. Angus Cameron. This relic was secured by the efforts of one of your committee, Mrs. Goodloe.

Two Plates, the remains of a set used by Madame De la Court at her home in the vicinity of Mount Airy, where General Sullivan took his position before the battle of Germantown in 1777. Previous to and after this time, many heroes of the American Revolution, notably Washington, Lafayette, ene, Sullivan, and others, were entertained at this house. Madame De la Court, who married a Frenchman, came of a Dutch family who left Holland as exiles and went to Gurnsey in the sixteenth century. Later they came to America and settled in Pennsylvania: The plates were used at table and were saved some years after when the house was burned and pillaged by the Hessians. Presented to the Society by Mrs. Eleanor Holmes Lindsay.

A fragment of the British ship "Somerset,” which was wrecked off Cape Cod during the Revolutionary War, presented by Mrs. Eleanor Holmes Lindsay.

A piece of Charter Oak. This was taken from the tree after its fall, August 21, 1856, by its owner, Honorable J. W. Stuart, of Hartf3rd, Connecticut. It was presented by him to Mrs. Ellen Key Blunt, a daughter of Francis Scott Key, of Maryland, on September 27, 1858, and presented to the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution by her daughter, Alice Key Blunt, through Mrs. J. Pembroke Thom, State Regent of Maryland.

A satin embroidered waistcoat worn by Copeland Parker, surveyor and inspector of the port of Norfolk, Virginia, appointed by General Washington. Loaned to the Daughters of the American Revoluticn by Mr. Nicholas E. Jones, of Cleandrinking Manor, Montgomery County, Maryland.

An original deed of conveyance for a tract of land lying on a branch of Bull Run in Prince Edward County, Virginia, from the Right Honorable Thomas Lord Fairfax, Baron of Cameron, to Isaac Ferguson, dated July 12, 1740. Loaned by Mrs. Ella Buckner Smith through Mrs. Goodloe.

An original deed of conveyance from Lord Fairfax to Major John Champe, of a tract of land lying on Winters' Branch, Virginia, dated 19th day of July, 1743. Loaned by Mrs. Ella Buckner Smith through Mrs. Goodloe.

An original patent issued by the Commonwealth of Virginia tɔ William Wolcut, assignee of John Spencer, for a tract of land in Loudoun

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County, Virginia, dated 18th day of March, 1776, and signed by Robert Brooks, Governor of Virginia. Loaned by Mrs. Ella Buckner Smith, through Mrs. Goodloe.

Gold epaulets worn by Brigadier General (afterwards Major General) William Smallwood, when in command of the Maryland Line, at the revolutionary battle of Brooklyn Heights. These epaulets were brought to Cleandrinking Manor, Maryland, by Major John T. Stoddert, of Charles County, Maryland (General Smallwood's nephew), and presented by him to John Coates Jones, Esq. (of Cleandrinking Manor), the father of Nicholas E. Jones, Esq., the donor, in 1837. They have been in the family ever since.

Old portrait of Susannah Jones, sister of Brigade Major Jones, aide-de-camp of General Smallwood, during Revolutionary War.

Colonial miniature frame, in which Mr. Jones intends later placing an old family portrait of interest to the Daughters.

Old colonial lantern used during the War of the Revolution at Cleandrinking Manor. Brought from England 1750.

Candle-stick brought from England in 1750, and used throughout Revolution. Same as one formerly belonging to Washington (in Copp's collection) in National Museum, Washington.

Pewter tankard brought to Maryland from England in 1639, by the Hon. John Coates, gentleman, a friend of Lord Baltimore. This tankard was used throughout the Revolution at Cleandrinking Manor, Maryland, and was made during the period when England and France were claimed to have been under one King. It bears on top the fleur-de-lys of France, and the handle is surmounted by three feathers, the insignia of the Prince of Wales.

Two fine cut-glass wine glasses, brought from England in 1750, same as Washington's, in the Copp collection, at the National Museum.

Old silver loving cup, which belonged to Copeland Parker, Esq., who was appointed by General Washington Surveyor and Inspector of the Port of Norfolk.

Snuff box, used by Mr. Jones' family in colonial and revolutionary days.

All the foregoing, after and including the gold epaulets of General Smallwood, were presented to the National Society by Mr. Nicholas E. Jones of Cleandrinking Manor, Montgomery County, Maryland, through lirs. Robert Stockwell Hatcher.

A photograph of the Paul Jones fag, with photograph and letter from its owner, Mrs. Harriet R. P. Stafford, presented to Miss Mary Desha by Mrs. Stafford, and presented by Miss Desha to the National Society.

The New York Herald of April 19, 1875, containing a reproduction of the Salem Gazette, An Extra Sheet, Issued as a Broad Side,

Announcing the result of the Battle of Lexington,” presented by Miss Ella Loraine Dorsey.

The Maryland Journal and the Baltimore Advertiser, of August 20, 1773, presented by Miss Ella Loraine Dorsey.

A supplement of the Baltimore American of August 20, 1873, containing the history of Baltimore, Baltimore town and city from 1773 Presented by Miss Ella Loraine Dorsey.

One of the National Officers who possesses a portrait in oil of Samuel Chase, bought at the sale of the effects of his granddaughter, Mrs. Katherine Chase Oldfield, has told our chairman that the portrait is willed to the Society at her death.

Two relics of great interest have been promised the committee as soon as we have our Continental Hall.

Your committee has also had notice of articles in silver and china to be presented to the Society through Mrs. Cuthbert H. Slocum, oi Groton, Connecticut.

The committee has been embarrassed as to whether to accept relics of historical importance and not strictly revolutionary, but when accurately described, has taken the liberty of accepting them because of the history they contained. Respectfully submitted,

ELEANOR HOLMES LINDSAY,

Chairman,
JESSIE VAN ZILE BELDEN,
ELLEN R. JEWETT,
MARY 'B. TEMPLE,
BETTIE BECK GOODLOE,
G. E. SHIPPEN,
E. H. B. Roberts,

MRS. CLARK WARING.
February 23, 1899.
CHAIRMAN. What will you do with this report ladies ?

Mrs. Nash. I move that the report be accepted with thanks to the Committee.

Seconded.

CHAIRMAN. It is moved and seconded that this report be accepted with thanks. All in favor of this motion will please say "aye;" contrary, "no." Carried.

Mrs. Green. May I offer for this collection a portion of the wood from the beam of the Nathan Hale school-house in Connecticut, where the young patriot Nathan Hale went from teaching the youth of his country to meet his country's call to arms? I have in my possession a piece of the original

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