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Dr. McGEE. She says, “one-half of their fees.” What is one-half of their fees?

PRESIDENT GENERAL. One-half of the life membership. Dr. McGee. Do you know what it is?

PRESIDENT GENERAL. I do not, but that is to be settled by their Society.

Mrs. KING. As the member said, some of their life members have already been life members of this Society. My substitute will bear on those who have not been life members of the association.

Dr. McGEE. I supposed you meant half of ours, $12.50.
Mrs. KING. Oh no, one-half of theirs.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. The motion will now stand in this way:

READER. "I move that the life members of the Daughters of the Revolution become life members of the Daughters of the American Revolution upon payment of one-half of their life membership dues into the treasury of the National Society, Daughters of the American Revolution."

Miss PIKE. I move an amendment. I move that on-half of the life membership fees of the Daughters of the Revolution shall be transferred to the Continental Hall fund of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. The Chair is obliged to rule this motion out of order, as that is covered by the Constitution.

Miss Pike. Is that covered by the Constitution?

Mrs. CHURCHMAN. Ladies of the Eighth Continental Congress, if the Daughters of the Revolution decide to accept this proposition from the Daughters of the American Revolution for union, shall we not trust them to do the right thing with their money. [Applause.]

Miss LATHROP. Why should the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution, that we have all been so proud of, and have worn our badge with pride, why should we sell our birthright for the sake of 2,900 women joining us?

Mrs. LOCKWOOD. I think the question for us to settle just now is whether we are a patriotic Society or whether we are a society of money-grabbers. [Applause.)

Mrs. LOTHROP. Members of the Eighth Continental Congress, I have not taken your time to any extent in this Congress, preferring to keep silent on the many questions on which others could speak so much better than myself. Do we earnestly desire those sisters of ours who believe essentially as we do, and we as they, to join us or not? If we do, let us drop the money question and ask them in. Afterward those questions will be settled as they rightfully should be, at that time but not at this.

Mrs. GREEN. Shall we not, in the gracious words of Miss Desha and the latter lady, Mrs. Churchman, and the last lady, shall we not in their gracious words hand out and give them a gracious, polite invitation, without money and without price?

A MEMBER. I move the previous question.
Seconded.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. Previous question is moved; do you wish to close debate? All in favor will please say "aye;" opposed, “no.” The motion is carried. We have substituted this amendment, and now we must vote on its adoption. Shall the main question now be put? The vote is to substitute this for the main motion.

Mrs. LINDSAY reads original clause: "Life members of the Daughters of the Revolution Society shall become life members of the Daughters of the American Revolution Society.”

READER reads substitute: “I move that life members of the Daughters of the Revolution become members of the Daughters of the American Revolution upon payment of onehalf of their life membership dues into the treasury of the National Society, Daughters of the American Revolution.”

Mrs. McLEAN. Is it in order to speak to that?

PRESIDENT GENERAL. No, the previous question moved, to close debate. The question is on substituting thi; amendment. All in favor of substituting this for the original clause will please say "aye;" opposed, "no." It is lost. The question recurs to the main motion.

Mrs. LINDSAY reads: "Life members of the Daughters of the Revolution Society shall become life members of the Daughters of the American Revolution Society."

was

PRESIDENT GENERAL. All in favor of this clause will please "aye;" opposed, "no." It is carried.

Mrs. LINDSAY. "No annuz' dues required until February 1, 1900.”

Mrs. WARREN, of Connecticut. I move that this clause be accepted.

Seconded.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. All in favor of accepting this clause will please say "aye;" opposed, “no." It is carried.

Mrs. LINDSAY. “No charter fees shall be exacted from Chapters admitted from the Daughters of the Revolution Society."

Mrs. McLEAN. Is it in order Madam Chairman, to speak to this resolution ?

PRESIDENT GENERAL. The question is on this last clause.

Mrs. McLEAN. Have I your recognition, Madam Chairman? Madam Chairman, Daughters, having been a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution from its inception, before there was any other society, and being ardently desirous that there shall for the future be no other society, but that the Daughters of the Revolution enter with us and we form one great, magnificent, noble, patriotic body of women, the Daughters of the American Revolution, I would here suggest to this house that this question having been brought up two years ago as to the acceptance of Chapters as a body, and acted on in that Congress, it is res judicata unless you rescind the action of two years ago. We accepted, we were happy to extend a cordial invitation to every Daughter of the Revolution to enter with us as our constitutional requirements make necessary. It is, Madam Chairman, at least I submit the point, a constitutional point. There is no provision in our Constitution admitting Chapters, no matter how much we may want them. The Constitution provides for the entrance of individual members into the Daughters of the American Revolution. [Applause.) And I trust this Congress may extend so cordial and invitation to the Daughters of the Revolution that every individual member will join us, but as individual members.

Mrs. LINDSAY. Madam President and ladies of the Congress, if you wait until I read the next clause, just the last clause of this paper, you will see that the question in reference to the Constitution is covered.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. Will you kindly read it so that it can be understood by all.

Mrs. LINDSAY. (11) “The Constitution of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution shall be so far amended as may be necessary to ratify, confirm and fully carry out this agreement or plan.”

Mrs. McCARTNEY. Madam Chairman and ladies of the Eighth Continental Congress, far be it from me to put one cog into the wheel of this union. I was anxious for it from the beginning, and I am to the end. But we have a Constitution which says each Chapter shall be entitled, upon payment of the cost thereof, to a certificate or charter, duly certifying the same, etc. Now can we

PRESIDENT GENERAL. Mrs. McCartney, did you hear the last clause?

Mrs. McCARTNEY. I did, but I was afraid that this would not cover it, and I wanted to see it.

Mrs. LINDSAY. If the Congress will allow, a little later I have an amendment which covers it, to offer to the Congre:s.

Mrs. McCARTNEY. Have you an amendment, might I ask, to the Constitution?

Mrs. LINDSAY. Yes.
Mrs. McCARTNEY. And when can that be amended?
Mrs. LINDSAY. Next year.
Mrs. McCARTNEY. And when will they come in?

Mrs. LINDSAY. Next year. They are admitted at the same time the amendment to the Constitution comes in.

Mrs. McCARTNEY. I quite comprehend that.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. And they cannot enter until one year from now.

Mrs. McCARTNEY. This Constitution requires payment for their charter. They must pay it, and we cannot, under the Constitution, give them charters without paying for them. You can give away all you want to, but you cannot give away your Constitution.

Mrs. NASH. I rise to a question of information. Two years ago, at the Continental Congress, on motion of Mrs. Ritchie, State Regent of Maryland, a motion was made and carried that the Daughters of the American Revolution should be received as individuals and not as Chapters. I want to ask if that action of the Congress has been rescinded? Would it not be necessary for us to rescind the action of that Congress?

Mrs. WALWORTH. May I say, in reply to that, that that resolution was passed contingently upon an agreement with the Daughters of the Revolution to join with us. It was not incorporated as a part of our law by any means. It was simply dependent upon a future agreement. That agreement fell through, and that resolution fell through and is void. Therefore I think you can act on it with perfect propriety. [Applause.]

PRESIDENT GENERAL. The Chair will state that this is simply a recommendation.

Mrs. McLean. Is there a clause in our Constitution permitting Chapters in a body to enter?

PRESIDENT GENERAL. Did you hear the reading of the last clause, Mrs. McLean?

Mrs. McLEAN. I did, but I did not so consider it, and I ask for information.

Mrs. LINDSAY. Will the Congress allow me to explain. There is an amendment prepared to cover this.

Mrs. McLEAN. Has the amendment been acted on?
PRESIDENT GENERAL. It is not yet presented.
Mrs. McLean. Then it is not a part of the Constitution.

Mrs. LINDSAY. “The Constitution of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution shall be so far amended as may be necessary to ratify, confirm and fully carry our this agreement or plan.”

Mrs. McWILLIAMS. Can we act upon a recommendation made by a committee that is not in conformity with our Constitution?

PRESIDENT GENERAL. Do you say that the committee is not in conformity with the Constitution? Mrs. McWILLIAMS. This recommendation. Car

we act upon a recommendation offered by a committee ? Our Constitution provides for this $5 to be paid for our charters. I am

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