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names of actions, words, marks or symbols as are placed puruant to law or authorized regulations upon such flags, standards, colors or ensigns which are the property of or used in the service of any State or the United States.” This is an extract from the bill just passed by the New York State Assembly.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. Miss Vanderpoel, is this intended as an amendment to the Flag Committee's report?

Miss VANDERPOEL. This is in the bill; it is intended to substitute this for that.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. It is moved and seconded to substitute; the reading at present is "Section 2. No device, nor inscription, nor the representation or image of any person or thing shall be imprinted upon, painted upon, or attached to the National Flag, or upon or to the Coat-of-Arms of the United States except that the devices now attached and used by the Grand Army of the Republic may continue to be used by them;" for the last clause substitute, "except such inscriptions, names of actions, words, marks or symbols as are placed pursuant to law or authorized regulations upon such flags, standards, colors or ensigns which are the property of or used in the service of any State in the United States.”

Mrs. KEMPSTER. May I state this for the National Society, that two years ago it endorsed this in its Continental Congress assembled. If we do that we go back the whole two years; we immediately undo the work that has been done in trying to secure the protection of the flag from any form of desecration. We ask only that there shall be no action by the Daughters of the American Revolution stating that its work is all a mistake, but leave the details of bills to be settled, as they are generally settled, by the committee in Congress, and not divide our own body. That is all I have to say, Madam, on that subject.

A MEMBER, of New York. As Historian of the Chapter I would like to state that I have communicated in connection with the work of flag desecration. A lover of our beloved flag, I have communicated with Senator Chandler, of New York city; I have not yet heard from him. I have communicated with Senator Parker, of New Jersey, and have received

a letter from him in which he states their State is considering the matter seriously, but it is a difficult affair to frame.

Mrs. WHITNEY, of Michigan. I would like to ask if this amendment allows any printing of any kind to be put on the flag. I ask that for information, as we did not quite catch it back here.

READER. "Omit last clause of Section 2 and substitute 'except such incriptions, names of actions, words, marks or symbols as are placed, pursuant to law or authorized regulations, upon such flags, standards, colors or ensigns, which are the property of, or used in, the service of any State or the United States.' PRESIDENT GENERAL. That would include

would include inscriptions, such as the State or the United States might designate.

Miss HUEY, of Philadelphia. In the political campaigns of 1896 flags were displayed with below them extracts from speeches of Lincoln and Garfield, and all such men. Would this resolution preclude that? Certainly no one could object to that use of the flag, and I would like to know whether this resolution would forbid it. No one thinks more of the flag than I do, but I would like to know about it.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. This amendment provides for inscriptions.

Mrs. WHITNEY. May I have the floor for one moment?

PRESIDENT GENERAL. If the assembly does not object. There is no objection.

Mrs. WHITNEY. When General Grant went to Washington, and was then cur President, as he entered the city there was a large banner, the American flag, hung over one of the streets, and on it was the name of Grant; he stopped and ordered one of his orderlies to request that the flag be taken down and his name be taken off. [Applause. He said, "there is not a man living in the United States whose name is great enough to put on the American flag.” [Applause.]

PRESIDENT GENERAL. Are you ready for the question:

Mrs. KEMPSTER. May I give a word from a letter from Theodore Roosevelt? I would like to quote one line from it.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. If the house does not object. There is ro objection.

Mrs. KEMPSTER. Theodore Roosevelt, when Assistant Secretary of the Navy, wrote to Mrs. Kempster, chairman of the Flag Committee, “I am in favor of this measure of the Daughters of the American Revolution Flag Committee, and if the opportunity comes up I will do what I can towards its passage." [Applause.)

Mrs. PETERSON, of Buffalo. If we have the State flag bills, is not that sufficiently effective?

Mrs. EDWARDS. I move the previous question.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. Shall the main question now be put? Do you wish to close debate ? All in favor will please say "aye;" opposed, "no." It is carried. The amendment is befor the house; that will have to be voted on. Read the amendment, please.

READER. "Ömit last clause of Section 2 and substitute 'except such inscriptions, names of actions, words, marks or symbols as are placed, pursuant to law or authorized regulations, upon such flags, standards, colors or ensigns, which are the property of, or used in, the service of any State or the United States.'"

PRESIDENT GENERAL. I hope the house understands what it is to vote upon, it is upon the amendment which has just been read. All in favor will please say "aye;" opposed, “no." It is lost. The question recurs to the main report.

Miss NEWELL. I move that this report be accepted and the committee continued in office.

Seconded.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. It is noved and seconded that this report be accepted and the committee be continued. Is the power of appointing committees given to the house? The motion is in order.

Miss NEWELL. I wish to say that I wish to amend that. so that the committee be appointed by the Chair.

Seconded.

Mrs. HARRISON. Cannot the report be accepted and the committee continued? I think that is what we want.

Mrs. THOMPSON. I move the previous question. PRESIDENT GENERAL. The amendment is before the hou.e READER. The motion before the house of Miss Neweil

was that the report be accepted and the committee continued in office. The amendment was that the committee be appointed by the Chair.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. The Chair has no desire to appoint the committee; she simply desired that it be corrected, but you must act on it first. The question is on the amendment first; are you ready for the question ?

Mrs. ROBERTS. State the amendment, please.
READER. “That the committee be appointed by the Chair."
Dr. McGEE. Is that an adidtion to the motion ?

READER. No, it is just a change. I will read both; first, . that the report be accepted and the committee continued; amendment, that the committee be appointed by the Chair.

Dr. McGEE. When it says the committee be continued, it surely does not mean the members of the committee, it means the Flag Committee. Does it mean the members of the committee to be continued ?

READER. Miss Newell, will you please state if you meant the members of the same committee to continue?

Miss NEWELL. The members of the same committee.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. All in favor will please say "aye;" opposed, “no.” It is carried. The question recurs to the amended motion.

READER. That the report be accepted, the committee to be appointed by the Chair.

Miss HUEY. Does not the President General appoint all committees? I ask for information.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. No, she does not. The Chair states that she has the privilege cf naming the standing committees. The others are named by the Board, or the Board orders that they shall be named by the President General.

Mrs. Huey. Thank you very much. I asked for information.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. The question is on the motion; are vou ready for the question. (Cries of "Question !") All in iavor will please say "aye;" opposed, "no.” It is carried.

Mrs. PAINTER. May the Reader state a question of privilege?

READER. Mrs. Painter has requested that it be stated that under an inadvertence, while voting, she did not fill out the

blank for President General, thinking that the ballot had been cast for President General by vote of the house; that she and another member of her Chapter failed to fill out that blank, Mrs. Park Painter and Mrs. J. B. Oliver, of the Pittsburg Chapter. They now wish to have it understood that they wish to be understood as voting for the Chair, which would make her vote 400 instead of 398.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. They cannot be recorded as votes at this stage. The Chair appreciates the courtesy of these two ladies.

Mrs. MARY SAWYER Footy THOMAS. I rise to present three revolutionary relics which I have received by mail for this Congress. I have received from a child in Waterville, Maine, three pieces of continental currency. The first is dated May 10, 1775, and is for $4; the second November 2, 1776, $6: the third, for $20, is dated September 26, 1778. The word “United States” is on the last one. These are the gift of a child, presented by Edward Moore, a descendant of Catherine Daniel Moore, of the Revolutionary Army. I ask that the chairman of the Revolutionary Relics Committee acknowledge those in person. I think if the little boy could give these, he should have a letter from this grand Society. In the report of the chairman of Revolutionary Relics Committee I ask that the steel engravings may appear among the list of rev)lutionary relics. I failed to give the names of these engravings to the chairman, Mrs. Lindsay, therefore they did not apprar

At her request I make this motion: I move that the engravings “Bunker Hill” and “Quebec" be given over to the Revolutionary Relics Committee and deposited in the Smithsonian with the other relics already there.

PRESIDENT GENERAL. You lave heard the motion. All in favor will please say “aye;" opposed, “no.” It is carried.

Mrs. HENRY. By an unpardonable oversight on my part, in making my report to Congress, as Corresponding Secretary General, I neglected to state the efficient services and assistance rendered me by Mrs. Charles O'Neil, the Acting Secretary of the Sub-War Committee, and who so ably performed the duties of that position during the entire summer. I wish this incorporated in my report by permission of the Congress.

in her report.

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