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great measure depends. They are not allowed to be with the ewes at any time, except during the breeding season, but are provided with an enclosure near the house, securely fenced, containing shelter, water, shade trees, salt, feeding trough, &c. They are taught to associate with and to receive the attentions of the members of the family, and others, and are always kindly treated and well cared for.

I regard sheep as the pleasantest as well as the most profitable stock kept on the farm. There is no quarreling and fighting, no chasing of each other, no striving for the mastery, as among neat stock, swine, &c., no exhibition of ill-temper or viciousness; all are peaceable and friendly, manifesting a fondness and good-will towards each other, not common in ang other collection of equal numbers of quadrupeds or bipeds. To the person who understands their nature and disposition, there is no animal more easily managed, or that yields a readier obedience to his wishes; and I can but hope that their number may be largely increased throughout our land.

Hoping that at our future “Shows" a larger number, and of the different breeds—Merino, Downs, Cotswolds, &c., &c.of sheep will be exhibited.

I remain
Very truly yours,

CHARLES CORLISS. Poplar Lawn, Haverhill, Nov. 18, 1862.

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TAYLORE ADAMS BOSTON BARN OF THE ESSEX AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY AT THE TREADWELL FARM.

TREADWELL FARM.

The Committee on the Treadwell Farm would respectfully make the following report :

In accordance with the votes passed by the Trustees and Society, a new barn has been erected on the farm, at a cost of twelve hundred dollars, above the underpinning--Mr. Brown doing the excavation and stone work for the cellar at his own cost; the barn having been built on a contract by Mr. John H. Potter of Topsfield—all of which has been performed to the entire satisfaction of the Committee.

The report of the Building Committee is hereto annexed.

In consequence of the attention which Mr. Brown has been obliged to give the building of the barn, the farm at large has not had quite as much attention as usual; but still from the increased amount of fertilizing products arising from the excavation of the cellar--the new barn occupying the site of the old-the farm will receive no detriment.

The report of Mr. Brown is hereto appended, respecting the several experiments instituted by the Committee. They appear to be in favorable progress; and from the additional manure required and brought on for these experiments, the farm is progressing to a much improved condition. All of which is respectfully submitted.

R. A. MERRIAM,
ALLEN W. DODGE.
RICHARD S. FAY,
RICHARD S. ROGERS,
DANIEL ADAMS, COMMITTEE.
GEO. B. LORING,
JOHN WHITTREDGE,
JOSEPH HOW,

CHAS. P. PRESTON,
Topsfield, Nov. 17, 1862.

REPORT OF BUILDING COMMITTEE.

The Committee appointed to erect a barn upon the Treadwell Farm would respectfully report :

In laying out a plan for the barn, they were governed by a desire to construct a convenient, well-proportioned, and economical building, particularly adapted to the wants and the means of a New England farmer. The size of a barn should conform to the extent of the farm, and the mode of cultivation with which it is to be connected. It should be as commodious as possible—so shaped as to furnish the most room in the space assigned it. There should be at the same time no waste of room. The storage in the barn should be easy, and so arranged as to bring the contents as near as possible to the point where they are to be used: The scaffolds and bays should be easy

of access; so that the laborer shall not be compelled to lift the hay to too great a height, or to carry it a great distance. The hay should be so situated as to be easily fed to the cattle. A barn, therefore, with two drive-ways, one at each end, the passage being across the building, is inconvenient ; for hay is not easily stored between these passage-ways, and the way from one end of the barn to the other is dark and narrow. А barn, too, which has a scaffold permanently fixed over the drive-way, as is often seen, is not convenient, and is wasteful of room; for it is very difficult to pitch hay through a scuttle many feet overhead, and all the room below the scaffold, and above the height of the mow-beams is lost. A barn situated on a hillside, so arranged as to hạve drive-way immediately under the roof, with deep bays on each side, is not economical either of room or of money. The room below the drive-way is lost, the frame is expensive, and the different parts of the barn are inconveniently removed from each other.

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