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HIBERNIAN MAGAZINE.

A MONTHLY JOURNAL

or

LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND ART.

VOLUME V.

JANUARY TO JUNE, 1864.

New Series.

DUBLIN:

JAMES DUFFY, 15, WELLINGTON-QUAY, AND
22, PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON.

PATTISON JOLLY,

DUBLIN: PRINTED BY

22, ESSEX-ST., WEST

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TOWARDS the close of September, 1626, the obsequies of Hugh McCawell, archbishop of Armagh, were duly solemnized in the Franciscan church of Aracoeli, on the Capitoline-hill, at Rome. Brief, indeed, was his tenure of the Irish primacy, for in the very month of his elevation he was seized with fever, while making a last pilgrimage to the patriarchal basilicas, and died, after a short illness, just as he was preparing to set out for Ireland. His remains were borne to the crypt of St. Isidore's, and there John, earl of Tyrone, erected a votive tablet to the memory of his friend and earliest preceptor.

A truly great man, indeed, was this archbishop, deeply learned in scholastic philosophy, and author of many works, which exhibit a rare knowledge of metaphysics, and a power of reasoning in which he was little inferior to his eminent countryman Scotus, surnamed the "Subtile."

Hugh McCawell, a native of Down, was born in the neighbourhood of Sabul Padraic, about the year 1571. His parents were poor, but their poverty notwithstanding, they did all in their power to advance his early education, and when the boy grew up he crossed over to the Isle of Man, and remained there many years, devoting himself to the study of classics and dialectics till he was recalled to Ireland, by Hugh, prince of Tyrone, who took him into his household, and appointed him tutor to his sons, Henry and Hugh. Under such an able master those noble youths made rapid proficiency, and so highly were McCawell's services appreciated by the great chieftain-the greatest Ireland has ever seen-that he conferred the honour of knighthood on him, made him his confidant, and offered him a command in his army. McCawell, however, having no taste for the profession of arms, declined the honour. But there was another department in which he could serve his lord and chieftain, and when the latter proposed to him to accompany his son Henry to the court of of Spain, in order

VOL. V. NEW SERIES.

A

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