Annual Report

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Page 179 - ... accept the results of Pasteur's antirabies inoculation, I most cheerfully credit him with his earnest endeavors and the instructive value of his success in anthrax, hen-cholera and rouget in the hog. It may be well for me to state why I do not believe in Pasteur's method of preventing rabies. First: there is not a particle of evidence to be found in the long historical record of this disease that it is non-recurrent in character. Not a single case of natural recovery in man or beast has ever...
Page 251 - ... skeleton' leaf. As they grow older, however, they devour all portions of the leaf, and often eat also the petioles and tender stems. Opportunity has not been given to determine the exact length of the larval life of this insect, but judging from observations made, this cannot greatly exceed a week. Parties living in the region where the insect was present in great numbers give ten days as the length of the time in which the chief destruction was accomplished.
Page 243 - Another spray in the latter part of July or the first part of August may be necessary to prevent late infection in wet seasons such as that of 1915.
Page 249 - Scapula by Walker, but properly belongs to Lederer's more restricted genus Eurycreon. The moth (Plate VI, Fig. 3) has an average expanse of 18mm. The general color is either orange or reddish-yellow inclining to buff, or more commonly a lighter or darker shade of gray, having, in certain lights, either a copperish or greenish reflection very similar to that on the wellknown Cotton Worm Moth (Aletia xylina). The characteristic markings, as shown in the figure, are the darker reniform and orbicular...
Page 251 - ... not succumb to death like the younger plants of smaller stature. * * *" Professor Popenoe gives the following account in the 1880 article already cited : " The following points in its history are the partial result of my study of this insect. Although I made careful search for the egg, I failed to discover it in situ, but it is without doubt deposited on the lower side of a leaf, or low down among the bases of a cluster of leaves, as newlyhatched larvae are found in both these situations, from...
Page 129 - There is no question but that the preferred food of this species is the foliage of plants of the genus Amarantua, called in different parts of the country Amaranth, Pig-weed, and Careless weed. This was very noticeable in our observations of 1873, and its next preference seemed to be Purslane. Professor Snow also mentions Lamb's Quarter (also called "Pig-weed" Chenopodium), as a favorite food plant.
Page 130 - In this shelter it is usually found at rest during the day, hanging by its feet, back downward, to the lower surface of the web. In other plants, several leaves may be drawn together for a place of concealment. If, indeed, the larvae are not partially gregarious, they are at least not disturbed by proximity to each other, as several may be found, at times, in a common web, although I believe, this is exceptional. As they are forced to move to new parts of the plant for fresh food, their webs are...
Page 251 - As soon as it [the larva] begins to move about, it begins to spin the web, and this is increased in extent as the movements of the larva are extended. It is very active in all stages of growth as a larva, and springs aside quickly when touched, sometimes throwing itself into a coil, but more often running rapidly away. At least in early life, the larva, when thrown off a leaf, will hang by a thread of silk. In case a single leaf is of sufficient size, as in the sweet potato, the well-grown larva...
Page 144 - By so much as any one of these conditions is deficient or lacking, by so much is the forest short of the ideal. Reduced evaporation is forest condition. Shade reduces evaporation. Dense growth furnishes not only straight clear timber, but shade. Mixed growth alone can preserve a continuous shade for a long time. Undergrowth assists in keeping the ground shaded. The forest planter, then, may learn a lesson from nature in recognizing these...
Page 250 - Moth (Aletia xylina). The characteristic markings, as shown in the figure, are the darker reniform and orbicular spots with a paler shade between them; two irregular transverse pale lines, generally relieved by darker shade, most intense posteriorly on the anterior line and basally or interiorly on the posterior line. The terminal space may be either paler or darker than the ground color. The markings are very variable, however, dark specimens (rantalis) having them all well defined, paler specimens...

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