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by your excellency at Philadelphia has been reprinted at the national printing office, framed, and placed in the same case beside the medal presented to France by the United States.

I am instructed to deliver to your excellency a copy of the address, also framed, and to beg you to keep it as a modest memento of your intervention in that memorable juncture.

My Government hopes that the arrangements thus made by it will meet the wishes of Congress. They were, at all events, prompted by sentiments entirely akin to those by which that high assembly was actuated when it voted the gift of France of the work of art now conserved in a place of honor among our national collections. Be pleased to accept, etc.,

JUSSERAND.

The Secretary of State to the French Ambassador.

No. 355.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, December 20, 1906. EXCELLENCY: I have the honor to acknowledge with thanks and appreciation the receipt of your note of the 15th instant, by which you inform me of the very appropriate disposition which has been made by the Government of France of the gold medal commemorative of the two hundredth anniversary of the birth of Benjamin Franklin, which, on April 20, 1906, at Philadelphia, I had the honor to present, through you, to the Government of the French Republic in pursuance of the act of the Congress of the United States of April 27, 1904.

I have taken pleasure in submitting a translation of your note, together with copies of the remarks which we made on that occasion, to the President with a view to their transmission to the Congress for the information of that body.

In advising you of this action, I beg at the same time to express to you my thanks for the framed facsimile of the print of our speeches which you inform me has been placed in the case beside the medal. This souvenir I have directed to be publicly exhibited in the library of the department. Accept, etc.,

ELIHU Root.

REMOVAL OF THE REMAINS OF ADMIRAL JOHN PAUL JONES.

[Continued from Foreign Relations, 1905, pp. 417 et seq.]
The Acting Secretary of State to Ambassador McCormick.

No. 125.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, March 5, 1906. SIR: The date of the formal removal of the remains of John Paul Jones at the United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md., has been fixed for April 24 next. It is the present intention of the Navy Department to have present on that occasion a naval force consisting of the second and fifth divisions of the United States Atlantic Fleet, the former composed of four battle ships and the latter of four cruisers. The second division is commanded by Rear-Admiral

Charles H. Davis, and the fifth division by Rear-Admiral R. B. Bradford, the former being the senior. The superintendent of the Naval Academy is Rear-Admiral J. H. Sands, Ù. S. Navy, who as senior officer present will have general charge of the arrangements of the naval ceremonies to be observed on that date.

You will communicate these facts to the French Government and request the courtesy of an attendance at Annapolis on that occasion of such French naval forces as it may deem convenient and desirable to send; and you will advise the department of the names of the vessels that may be sent and the name and rank of the officer commanding I am, etc.,

ROBERT BACON.

Ambassador McCormick to the Secretary of State. No. 117.]

AMERICAN EMBASSY,

Paris, April 6, 1906. Sir: Referring to Mr. Bacon's No. 125, of March 5, directing me to acquaint the French Government with the intention of our Navy Department to have present at Annapolis on April 24, on the occasion of the formal removal of the remains of Admiral John Paul Jones, a naval force consisting of four battle ships and four cruisers, and to request the courtesy of an attendance at that place on said day of such · French naval forces as it may deem convenient and desirable to send, I have now to inform the department that the French Government has gracefully yielded to the request.

I inclose herewith a copy and a translation of the note from Mr. Bourgeois giving this information, with the names of the vessels and their officers. I have, etc.,

ROBERT S. McCORMICK.

Mr. Bourgeois to Ambassador McCormick.

[Translation.]

Paris, April 2, 1906. Mr. AMBASSADOR : On the 19th of this month your excellency was good enough to acquaint me with his Government's desire to see the French navy repre sented at the ceremonies in connection with the transfer of the remains of Admiral Paul Jones, which are to take place at Annapolis on April 24 next.

I take much pleasure in informing your excellency that the Government of the Republic, which is happy to join in this ceremony, has decided to send to Annapolis, where it will arrive on April 20, a division of armed cruisers composed of La Marseillaise, Le Condé, and L'Amiral Aube.

This naval force will be placed under the orders of Rear-Admiral Campion.

La Marseillaise, bearing the rear-admiralty flag, is commanded by Captain Guepratte; there are 20 officers on board.

Le Condé is commanded by Captain Huguet and carries 17 officers.
L'Amiral Aube, commanded by Captain Lefèvre, has 20 officers.

Besides, the staff of Rear-Admiral Campion is composed of 5 officers, of
which Commander Batellet is chief of staff.
La Marseillaise, Le Conde, and L'Amiral Aube are vessels of 10,014 tons each.
Accept, etc.,

LÉON BOURGEOIS.

The French Ambassador to the Secretary of State.

[Translation.]

FRENCH EMBASSY TO THE UNITED STATES,

Washington, April 1, 1906. MR. SECRETARY OF STATE: Referring to my letter of the 7th of last month, relative to the removal of the remains of John Paul Jones, I have the honor to inform your excellency that, in response to the courteous invitation of the Federal Government, the Government of the Republic has decided to send to Annapolis, for the occasion, a naval detachment of cruisers, under command of Rear-Admiral Campion.

This detachment will be composed of the Marseillaise, the Conde, and the Amiral Aube. It will reach Annapolis by the 20th of April. Please accept, etc.,

JUSSERAND.

The Acting Secretary of State to the French Ambassador.

No. 296.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, April 7, 1906. EXCELLENCY: I beg to acknowledge the receipt of your note of the 1st instant, and to express the gratification and high appreciation felt by this Government at the expedition of three cruisers' to represent the French Government at the ceremonies attending the removal of the remains of John Paul Jones.

I have taken pleasure in advising the Secretary of the Navy of your Government's courteous action, and have informed him that the Marseillaise, the Condé, and L’Amiral Aube will reach Annapolis on the 20th instant. Accept, etc.,

ROBERT BACON.

President Roosevelt to the President of France.

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington, April 24, 1906. On the occasion of the formal reception at Annapolis of the body of John Paul Jones I wish to thank you, and through you the great French nation, for its distinguished courtesy in connection with this event, a courtesy of a kind which serves to keep even more vividly before us the invaluable aid rendered by France to this country at what was well nigh the most critical period of its history. France holds a peculiar place in the heart of the American people, and on behalf of that people I wish all success, prosperity, and happiness to the mighty Republic over which you preside.

THEODORE ROOSEVELT.

DISASTER IN FRENCH MINES.

President Roosevelt to the President of the French Republic.

[Telegram.]

WASHINGTON, March 12, 1906. I have learned with sorrow of the terrible calamity which has befallen France, and tender to its Government and the afflicted families the sincere sympathy of the Government and the people of the United States.

THEODORE ROOSEVELT.

President Fallières to President Roosevelt.

(Telegram.]

Paris, March 13, 1906. The sympathy so cordially expressed by you in the name of your Government and of the United States nation for the families of the victims of the terrible catastrophe of Courrieres touches me very sincerely, and in the name of the Government of the Republic I express to you my very deep gratitude.

A. FALLIÈRES.

GERMANY.

RECIPROCITY AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND

GERMANY.

The German Ambassador to the Secretary of State.

| Translation. )
IMPERIAL GERMAN EMBASSY,

Washington, November 29, 1905. Mr. SECRETARY OF STATE: I had the honor to inform your excellency in my verbal note of the 4th instant, with a statement of the grounds therefor, that the Imperial Government is constrained to terminate the German-American commercial agreement of July 10, 1900, at the close of the 28th day of February, 1906. I communicated at the same time my Government's proposal to enter into negotiations for the conclusion of a new treaty.

With reference thereto I have the honor, in pursuance of instructions received, to give the three months' notice terminating on the 1st of March, 1906, the commercial agreement between the German Empire and the United States of July 10, 1900, in accordance with section III of the same.

I have respectfully to beg that your excellency will acknowledge the receipt of this notice of termination. Accept, etc.,

STERNBURG.

The Acting Secretary of State to the German Ambassador. No. 297.]

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, December 2, 1905. EXCELLENCY: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your note of the 29th ultimo, in which, referring to your excellency's note verbale of the 4th ultimo, you give notice under instructions from your Government of its intention to terminate on March 1, 1906, the commercial agreement of July 10, 1900, between the United States and Germany, as provided in section 3 of the said agreement. Accept, etc.,

ROBERT BACON.

[Reprint of pertinent part of H. Report No. 1833, 59th Congress, 1st session.)
The Secretary of State to the German Ambassador.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, February 16, 1906. EXCELLENCY: I have received from the Secretary of the Treasury a formulation of the various changes in the Customs Laws and Regulations, to which

a Not printed.

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