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" Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world, Like a Colossus ; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. "
Typographical Journal - Page 128
1905
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The Manual of Liberty, Or, Testimonies in Behalf of the Rights of Mankind ...

1795 - 406 pages
...man of such a feeble temper -should So get the start of the majestic world, And bear the palm alone. Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. Brutus—and Ca:sar—What should be in...
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Dionysius Longinus On the Sublime: Translated from the Greek. With Notes and ...

Longinus, William Smith - 1800 - 215 pages
...insupportable. So Cassius speaks invidiously of Casar, in order to raise the indignation of Brutus ; Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus, and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find .ourselves dishonourable graves. So, have neither the appearance nor air...
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Mrs. Jordan, Volume 2

James Boadan - 1800
...Athens, but I shall let " Rome" remain in the following quotation, which fairly applies to him : " Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus, and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about, To find ourselves dishonourable graves. When went there by an age, since the...
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Cobbett's Political Register, Volume 1

1802
...surrendered our own and confirmed the onipire of the Consul. Buonaparte, alas ! " JDoth bestride this narrow world Like a Colossus ; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs and peep about •To find ourselves dishonorable graves," But, Sir, let us hdar the ministry....
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ..., Volume 8

William Shakespeare - 1803
...shout ! I do believe, that these applauses are For some new honours that are heap'd on Caesar. Cas. Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world. Like a Colossus ; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. Men at some time are masters of their...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare, Volume 7

William Shakespeare - 1804
...shout! I do believe, that these applauses are For some new honours that are heap'd on Caesar. Cas. Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world, Like a Colossus; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. Men at some time are masters of their...
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The Art of Speaking: Containing. An Essay, in which are Given Rules for ...

James Burgh - 1804 - 291 pages
...shout ! I do believe that their applauses are For some new honours that are heap'd on Ctssar. Cassius. Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus, and we sorry dwarfs Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. ... Men...
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The plays of William Shakspeare, pr. from the text of the ..., Volume 8

William Shakespeare - 1805
...shout! I do believe, that these applauses are For some new honours that are heap'd on Caesar. Cas. Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world, Like a Colossus; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. Men at some time are masters of their...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: With Notes of Various Commentators, Issue 11

William Shakespeare - 1806
...shout ! I do believe, that these applauses are For some new honours that are heap'd on Caesar. Cos. Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world, Like a Colossus ; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. Men at some time are masters of their...
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The Poetical Preceptor; Or, A Collection of Select Pieces of Poetry ...

1806 - 380 pages
...as I love The name of honour more than I fear death. CASSIOS in CONTKMPT of CJESAR, (SHAKESPEARE.) WHY man, he doth bestride the narrow world, Like a Colossus ; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. Men at some times are masters of their...
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