Page images
PDF
EPUB

COFFEE MOVEMENT IN SEPTEMBER, 1904.

Bags.

The "American Grocer," of October 12, 1904, states that during the month of September, 1904, the deliveries of coffee in Europe and the United States were the largest for any month during the last and present trade year, with the exception of October, 1903, and January, 1904. They total 1,500,361 bags for the month of September, and for the first quarter of 190+5 the deliveries amounted to 4,002,328 bags, against 4,046,859 bags in 1903-4.

The month of September is notable for heavy receipts in the United States and Europe, and also for an increase of 774,094 bags in the world's visible supply, bringing it to the largest on record, namely, 14,266,592 bags.

The September movement in detail was as follows:
Stocks September 1, 1904:
United States

3, 199, 500 Europe..

7,067, 798

10, 267, 298 Receipts during September: United States.

813, 859 Europe ...

701, 016

1, 514, 875 Total supply to October 1, 1904.

11, 782, 173 Less stock October 1, 1904: United States

3, 424, 706 Europe.

6,857, 106

10, 281, 812 Deliveries September, 1904: United States

588, 653 Europe..

911, 708

1,500, 361 Deliveries September, 1903..

Increase in September, 1904.. Average monthly deliveries, 1904-5.

1, 334, 109 Average monthly deliveries, 1903-4. Average monthly deliveries, 1902–3. Deliveries July, 1904, in the United States

548, 021 Deliveries August, 1904, in the United States..

537, 031 Deliveries September, 1904, in the United States

The visible supply of the world on October 1, 1904, was 14,266,592 bags, against 13,770,429 bags on the same date in 1903, a gain during the year of 496,163 bags.

Transactions on the Coffee Exchange were 1,082,250 bags. Total receipts in three months at Rio were 975,000 bags, and Santos, 3,561,000 bags, making a total of 4,536,000 bags, against 4,809,000 bags in 1903-4, 4,567,000 bags in 1902–3, and 5,555,000 bags in 1901–2.

The total deliveries during September in the United States consisted of 588,653 bags, of which 474,037 bags were Brazil and 114,616 bags

1, 489, 746

10, 615

1, 344, 476 1, 330, 541

588, 653

were all other sorts. Brazil furnished 80 per cent of the September deliveries, and other countries 20 per cent. It is apparent that the production of 1904–5 will come very close to the world's requirements. THE SUGAR SEASON OF 1903-4 IN THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS.

Mr. Vizzavona, Vice-Consul of France, writes from Honolulu under date of September 8, 1904, that the production of sugar cane in the Hawaiian Islands for the year 1903–4 is somewhat below that of the preceding year, not having responded to the expectations which the results obtained in 1902–3 seemed to warrant. The following figures, taken from statistics published by the local press, give an exact idea of the progressive movement in the development of this industry since 1897, which this year shows a decrease in production:

Tons. 1897-98.

229, 414 1898–99

282, 807 1899-1900.

289, 514 1900–1901.

360, 038 1901–2.

365, 611 1902-3.

437, 991 1903-4.

380,000 During the seven years mentioned in the above table the development of the industry which supplies all the commerce of these islands has progressed steadily. In a few years, owing to the improved machinery and to the establishment of an agronomical station and an experimental laboratory, the cultivation of sugar cane in Hawaii has almost doubled its production, and the cultivated area has increased by several million acres. The decrease in the last crop, , which amounts to 57,000 tons, in comparison with the year 1902–3, is attributed to the presence of an insect which has made its appearance in several plantations, and to-day threatens to overrun the islands.

This insect, which is known under the name of “leaf-hipper” (Perkinsiella saccharicida), must have been introduced in the Hawaiian Islands three years ago with the sugar cane imported from Queensland (Australia). Like all insects of the same nature, the “leaf-hipper" secretes large quantities of a clear and sweet liquid called dew of honey, which attracts other insect parasites, and thus facilitates the propagation of “rind disease” and “cane spume,” two kinds of cryptogamia which bury themselves in the stems of the cane and aid in its destruction.

The average prices of raw sugar cane during the year under review were as follows: Cents.

Cents, November... per pound.. 37 April

-per pound.. 34 December ..do.... 3} | May

..do.... 31 January .do... 31 June

.do.... 31 February do.... 37 July

.do.... 33 March. .do.... 3} | August

..do.... 41 COFFEE MOVEMENT IN SEPTEMBER, 1904.

The “American Grocer," of October 12, 1904, states that during the month of September, 1904, the deliveries of coffee in Europe and the United States were the largest for any month during the last and present trade year, with the exception of October, 1903, and January, 1904. They total 1,500,361 bags for the month of September, and for the first quarter of 190+5 the deliveries amounted to 4,002,328 bags, against 4,046,859 bags in 1903-4.

The month of September is notable for heavy receipts in the United States and Europe, and also for an increase of 774,094 bags in the world's visible supply, bringing it to the largest on record, namely, 14,266,592 bags.

The September movement in detail was as follows: Stocks September 1, 1904:

Bags. United States

3, 199, 500 Europe.

7,067, 798

10, 267, 298 Receipts during September: United States

813, 859 Europe.

701, 016

1,514, 875 Total supply to October 1, 1904.

11, 782, 173 Less stock October 1, 1904: United States

3, 424, 706 Europe ..

6, 857, 106

10, 281, 812 Deliveries September, 1904: United States

588, 653 Europe ..

911, 708

1,500, 361 Deliveries September, 1903..

1, 489, 746 Increase in September, 1904..

10, 615 Average monthly deliveries, 1904–5.

1, 334, 109 Average monthly deliveries, 1903-4.

1, 344, 476 Average monthly deliveries, 1902–3.

1, 330, 541 Deliveries July, 1904, in the United States

548, 021 Deliveries August, 1904, in the United States..

537, 031 Deliveries September, 1904, in the United States

588, 653 The visible supply of the world on October 1, 1904, was 14,266,592 bags, against 13,770,429 bags on the same date in 1903, a gain during the year of 496,163 bags.

Transactions on the Coffee Exchange were 1,082,250 bags. Total receipts in three months at Rio were 975,000 bags, and Santos, 3,561,000 bags, making a total of 4,536,000 bags, against 4,809,000 bags in 1903-4, 4,567,000 bags in 1902–3, and 5,555,000 bags in 1901–2.

The total deliveries during September in the United States consisted of 588,653 bags, of which 474,037 bags were Brazil and 114,616 bags were all other sorts. Brazil furnished 80 per cent of the September deliveries, and other countries 20 per cent. It is apparent that the production of 1904–5 will come very close to the world's requirements.

THE SUGAR SEASON OF 1903-4 IN THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS.

Mr. VIZZAVONA, Vice-Consul of France, writes from Honolulu under date of September 8, 1904, that the production of sugar cane in the Hawaiian Islands for the year 1903–4 is somewbat below that of the preceding year, not having responded to the expectations which the results obtained in 1902–3 seemed to warrant. The following figures, taken from statistics published by the local press, give an exact idea of the progressive movement in the development of this industry since 1897, which this year shows a decrease in production:

Tons. 1897-98..

229, 414 1898–99.

282, 807 1899–1900.

289, 544 1900–1901

360, 038 1901-2,

365, 611 1902-3.

437, 991 1903–4.

380,000 During the seven years mentioned in the above table the development of the industry which supplies all the commerce of these islands has progressed steadily. In a few years, owing to the improved machinery and to the establishment of an agronomical station and an experimental laboratory, the cultivation of sugar cane in Hawaii has almost doubled its production, and the cultivated area has increased by several million acres.

The decrease in the last crop, which amounts to 57,000 tons, in comparison with the year 1902–3, is attributed to the presence of an insect which has made its appearance in several plantations, and to-day threatens to overrun the islands.

This insect, which is known under the name of “leaf-hipper” (Perkinsiella saccharicida), must have been introduced in the Hawaiian Islands three years ago with the sugar cane imported from Queensland (Australia). Like all insects of the same nature, the “leaf-hipper" secretes large quantities of a clear and sweet liquid called dew of honey, which attracts other insect parasites, and thus facilitates the propagation of “rind disease" and "cane spume,” two kinds of cryptogamia which bury themselves in the stems of the cane and aid in its destruction.

The average prices of raw sugar cane during the year under review were as follows: Cents.

Cents. November.. per pound.. 31 April

per pound.. 31 December ..do.... 31 May

..do.... 31 January

..do.... 3
31 June

do.... 38 February

.do....
31 July

.do.... 3 March. .do... 31 August

.do.... 41 Total

The prices, which were rather low at the beginning of the year, show a slight increase from the month of June, which has been maintained up to the end of the year in question.

EXPORTS OF FARM IMPLEMENTS. The progress made by American manufacturers of agricultural implements in the leading foreign markets is shown in a report of finance and commerce for June, issued by the Department of Commerce and Labor, the total exports in this important line aggregating for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1904, no less than $22,749,635; a gain of nearly $1,750,000 over the fiscal year 1903, and of nearly $6,500,000 over the fiscal year 1902. The following table shows the exports of American farm implements for the last three fiscal years, according to the principal classifications enumerated by the Department:

[blocks in formation]

It will be noted that the gains in all lines as compared with 1902 have been almost phenomenal. In fact for nearly ten years, and especially during the last five years, American manufacturers of farm implements have been making steady strides in nearly every important agricultural country in the world, with the result that at present the United States is the largest exporter of farm implements, and American goods in this class are first in practically every importing market. The following table gives the export valuations for the last three fiscal years by countries:

[blocks in formation]

22, 749, 635

21,006, 622

16, 286, 740

« PreviousContinue »