The Dublin Review, Volume 32

Front Cover
Nicholas Patrick Wiseman
Tablet Publishing Company, 1852
 

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Page 54 - Is that poor man, that hangs on princes' favours. There is, betwixt that smile we would aspire to, . . . That sweet aspect of princes, and their ruin, More pangs and fears than wars or women have; And when he falls, he falls like Lucifer, Never to hope again.— {Enter Cromwell, amazedly.
Page 15 - And God said, Let the waters bring forth abundantly the moving creature that hath life, and fowl that may fly above the earth in the open firmament of heaven.
Page 259 - David will I lay upon his shoulder ; so he shall open, and none shall shut ; and he shall shut, and none shall open.
Page 259 - And to the angel of the church in Philadelphia write; These things saith he that is holy, he that is true, he that hath the key of David, he that openeth, and no man shutteth; and shutteth, and no man openeth...
Page 366 - Place, the elevated residence of the then Mr Jeffrey. I proposed that we should set up a Review ; this was acceded to with acclamation. I was appointed editor, and remained long enough in Edinburgh to edit the first number of the Edinburgh Review. The motto I proposed for the Review was : 'Tenui musam meditamur avena" — We cultivate literature upon a little oatmeal.
Page 270 - The capital which sends Scotch manufactures to London, and brings back English corn and manufactures to Edinburgh, necessarily replaces by етегу such operation, two British capitals which had both been employed in the agriculture or manufactures of Great Britain. The capital employed in purchasing foreign goods for home consumption, when this purchase is made with the produce of domestic industry, replaces too, by every such operation, two distinct capitals; but one of them only is employed...
Page 270 - The capital which is employed in purchasing in one part of the country, in order to sell in another the produce of the industry of that country, generally replaces, by every such operation, TWO distinct capitals, that had both been employed in the agriculture or manufactures of that country, and thereby enables them to continue that employment.
Page 366 - To appreciate the value of the Edinburgh Review, the state of England at the period when that journal began should be had in remembrance. The Catholics were not emancipated — the Corporation and Test Acts were unrepealed — the Game Laws were horribly oppressive — Steel Traps and Spring Guns were set all over the country — Prisoners tried for their Lives could have no Counsel — Lord Eldon and the Court of Chancery pressed heavily...
Page 60 - Who hath put this note upon thee to have "a miscarrying womb and dry breasts," to be strange to thine own flesh, and thine eye cruel towards thy little ones ? Thine own offspring, the fruit of thy womb, who love thee and would toil for thee, thou dost gaze upon with fear, as though a portent, or thou dost...
Page 367 - From the beginning of the century (about which time the Review began) to the death of Lord Liverpool, was an awful period for those who had the misfortune to entertain liberal opinions, and who were too honest to sell them for the ermine of the judge, or the lawn of the prelate...

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