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ADJUTANT GENERAL's OFFICE. No. 42. Washington, April 3, 1900.

o direction of the Secretary of War, the following is published to the Army for the information and guidance of all Concerned: Section 12 of the act of July 31, 1894 (28 Stat., 209), prescribes: Sec. 12. All monthly accounts shall be mailed or otherwise sent to the proper officer at Washington within ten days after the end of the month to which they relate, and quarterly and other accounts within twenty days after the period to which they relate, and shall be transmitted to and received by the Auditors within twenty days of their actual receipt at the proper office in Washington in the case of monthly and sixty days in the case of quarterly and other accounts. Permission has been given by the Secretary of the Treasury, in pursuance of authority vested in him by law, for relaxing the requirement of mailing or otherwise sending accounts, and he has extended the period of such relaxation to December 31, 1900. (See General Orders, No. 211, Headquarters Army, December 29, 1899, and the orders therein cited.) Under this permission the date of mailing as fixed by A. R., 627 has been temporarily changed to the 20th day of each month for all accounts, whether rendered in this country or in the island possessions. The exigency which required this temporary change having now ceased in the Subsistence Department at all depots, posts, and stations in the United States, except at the purchasing depots at New York, Chicago, and San Francisco, the relaxation of the law as to time of rendition of accounts is hereby withdrawn to take effect May 1, 1900, from all but the excepted depots, and accounts will thereafter be mailed on or before the 10th day of the month as required by A. R., 627. At the excepted depots the mailing of accounts may continue to be delayed until the 20th day of the month until further orders, or until December 31, 1900. In the island possessions of Cuba, Puerto Rico, and Hawaii the relaxation is hereby withdrawn as of date May 1, 1900, from ment of subsistence funds, and their accounts will thereafter be mailed on or before the 10th day of the month as required by A. R., 627. The mailing of the accounts of officers receiving and disbursing subsistence funds in the Philippines may continue to be delayed until the 20th day of the month until further orders, or until December 31, 1900. Officers receiving and disbursing subsistence funds on United States transports will after May 1, 1900, mail their accounts and returns at the port at which they may be when the ten days' limit will expire, or if they should be at sea when the ten days' limit expires, they will mail their accounts and returns at the next United States or island port at which a stop is made. Returns of subsistence stores and subsistence property will be rendered and mailed at all places concurrently with the rendering and mailing of accounts current and vouchers. An officer delinquent in mailing his subsistence account current and vouchers, or his returns, within the time hereinabove limited will transmit with them at the time of mailing a full explanation of the causes of delay for the action of the proper authorities.

BY COMMAND OF MAJOR GENERAL MILES:

H. C. CORBIN,
Adjutant General.

ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE,
No. 43.

Washington, April 4, 1900. The following order from the War Department is published to the Army for the information and guidance of all concerned:

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, March 2k, 1900. By direction of the President, and under the provisions of paragraph 198, Army Regulations, names to new batteries which have recently been constructed and sites for works to be constructed along the seacoast of the United States are hereby announced, as follows:

PORTLAND HARBOR, MAINE. Reservation on Cushing Island, Fort Levett, in honor of Christopher Levett, who explored Portland Harbor in 1623 and built the first fortified structure in the vicinity.

Twelve-inch battery, Cushing Island, Battery Bowd oin, in honor of James Boudoin, governor of Massachusetts, 1785–86, then including within its territorial limits the present State of Maine, and a member of the Federal Constitutional Convention.

Ten-inch battery, Cushing Island, Battery Kendrick, in honor of the late Professor Henry Lane Kendrick, who served with distinction as an officer in the war with Mexico and as a professor of sciences, U.S. Military Acaderay, 1857-80.

Battery of three 8-inch guns on South Fork, Great Diamond Island, Battery Weymouth, in honor of Captain George Weymouth, who made extensive explorations in this region, 1605.

Battery of two 8-inch guns on South Fork, Great Diamond Island, Bat. tery Honeycutt, in honor of the late Captain John T. Honeycutt, 6th U.S. Artillery, a distinguished artillerist, who died October 12, 1898, of typhoid fever contracted in the faithful performance of duty in the field.

Twelve-inch battery, North Fork, Great Diamond Island, Battery Berry, in honor of the late Major General Hiram G. Berry, U. S. Volunteers, a native of Maine, who was killed in action at Chancellorsville, Virginia, May 2, 1863.

Battery of three 8-inch guns on North Fork, Great Diamond Island, Battery Thompson, in honor of Lieutenant Colonel Samuel Thompson, of the Massachusetts Militia, who effected the capture of Captain H. Mowett, then in command of certain British vessels in the harbor of Falmouth, and thereby averted for the time being the destruction of that town, now Portland, October, 1775.

PORTSMOUTH HARBOR, NEW HAMPSHIRE. Reservation on Gerrish Island, Maine, Fort Foster, in honor of the late

Corps of Engineers, U'. S. Army, who served with distinction in the war with Mexico and in the war of 1861–65, attaining the rank of major general, U.S. Volunteers, in the latter.

Jerrys Point, New Hampshire. Fort Stark, in honór of John Stark, who in command of the New H:unpshire forces at the Battle of Bennington, August 16, 1777, achiered : brilliant victory, for which he was awarded the thanks of Congress and a commission as brigadier general in the Con. tinental Army, in which position he served with unusual distinction until the close of the war.

BOSTON HARBOR, MASSACHUSETTS. Gun battery reservation, Grovers Cliff, Fort Heuth, in honor of William Heath, a delegate from Massachusetts to the Federal Constitutional Convention, who served faithfully and honorably as a major general in the Continental Army during the war of the Revolution.

Twelve-inch battery reservation, Grovers Cliff, Battery Theodore Tinthrop, in honor of the late Major Theodore Winthrop, U. S. Volunteers, killed in action, June 10, 1861, at Big Bethel, Virginia.

Lovells Island. Fort Standish, in honor of Vyles Standish, a famous soldier who joined the expedition sailing on the " Mayflower "and gained distinction in the defense of the Plymouth colony and in the direction of operations against hostile Indians, 1620-56.

Nantasket Head reservation near Hull, Fort Revere, in honor of Paul Revere, a native of Massachusetts and lieutenant colonel of artillery in the Continental Army, who, on the night of April 18, 1775, made his famous ride from Charlestown to Concord, warning the inhabitants of the approach of the British.

Peddocks Island, Fort Andrews, in honor of George Leonard Andrews, professor of languages. U. S. Military Academy, 1861-92, who served throughout the war of 1851-65, and was brevetted major general of volun. teers for faithful and meritorious service.

NARRAGANSETT BAY, RHODE ISLAND. Reservation at the Dumplings, Conanicut Island. Fort Wetherill, in honor of the late Captain Alexander M. Wetherill, 6th U. S. Infantry. killed in action, July 1, 1-98, at San Juan. Santiago, Cuba.

Mortar battery at Fort Greble, Battery Sedgwick, in honor of the late Major General John Sedgwick, U. S. Volunteers, a distinguished soldier of the war with Mexico and the war of 1861–65, who was killed at the Battle of Spottsylvania, May 9, 1864.

Ten-inch battery at Fort Greble, Battery Fale, in honor of Captain Nathan Hale, of the revolutionary forces, who was captured by the British and hanged asa spy September 22. 1776.

Mortar battery at Fort Adams, Battery Greene, in honor of Major General Nathaniel Greene. Continental Army, a distinguished citizen of Rhode Island, who exercised important command under General Washington and in the Carolinas during the war of the Revolution.

EASTERN ENTRANCE TO LONG ISLAND SOUND. Reservation at Mapatree Point, Rhode Island, Fort Mansfield, in honor of the late Major General J. K. F. Mansfield, U.S. Volunteers, Inspector

General, U. S. Army, 1853-61. who was a veteran of the war with Mexico and the war of 1861-65, and died September 18, 1862, of wounds received at the Battle of Antietam, the day previovs.

Fishers Island, New York, Fort H. G. Wright, in honor of the late Major General Horatio G. Wright, U. S. Volunteers, a distinguished officer of the war of 1861-65, and Chief of Engineers, U. S. Army, 1879-81.

EASTERN ENTRANCE TO NEW YORK HARBOR.

Six-inch battery at Fort Totten, Battery Yahan, in honor of the late Dennis H. Mahan, professor of engineering, U. S. Military Academy, 1832-71.

Mortar battery at Fort Totten, Battery King, in honor of the late Lieutenant Colonel William R. King, Corps of Engineers, U. S. Army, who served with distinction during the war of 1861-65, and was the designer of a successful counterpoise gun carriage for seacoast guns.

SOUTHERN ENTRANCE TO NEW YORK HARBOR.

Twelve-inch battery on King estate, Fort Newton, Battery Richmond, after old Fort Richmond, now Fort Wadsworth, which was named from the county in which it was situated.

Twelve-inch battery in old Battery Hudson, Battery Hudson, after the old earth battery in whtch located.

Eight-inch battery. Fort Wadsworth, Battery Duane, in honor of the late Brigadier General James C. Dunne, U.S. Army, a native of New York, a distinguished officer of the war of 1861-65, and Chief of Engineers, U.S. Army, 1886-88.

Battery of seven 10-inch guns, Fort Hamilton, Battery Gillmore, in honor of the late Major General Quincy A. Gillmore, U. S. Volunteers, colonel, Corps of Engineers, U. S. Army, a distinguished officer of the war of 1861-f5.

Battery of four 12-inchguns, Fort Hamilton, Battery Doubleday, in honor of the late Major General Abner Double-lay. I'. S. Volunteers. a native of New York, and a distinguished off er of the war with Mexico and the war of 1861-65.

Seven-gun battery in old stone fort at Sandy Hook, Battery Halleck, in honor of the lato Major General Henry 17, Halleck, U. S. Army, commander-in-chief of the United States Army, 1862 64.

Battery of two 10-inch guns at Fort Hancork, Battery Cranger, irrhonor of the late Major General Gordon (ranger, l'. S. Volunteers, a native of New York, and a distinguished officer of the war with Mexico and the War of 1861-65.

BALTIMORE HARBOR, MARYLAND. Reservation at North Point, Maryland, Fort Howard, in honor of Colonel John Eager Howard, a famous soldier of the Viaryland line, wlo served with distinction during the war of the Revolution. Reservation at Rock Point. Maryland, Fort Smallwood, in honor of Major General William Smallwood, Continental Army, who served as

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