Page images
PDF
EPUB

ored children in, under Massachu-
setts laws, II. 342. Must be open
to all, II. 344, 371; XIV. 393, 413.
Establishment of, in Massachusetts,
V. 277; IX. 339; XI. 157. Early
opposed in Virginia, V. 279; XI.
157. Contributions of, for statue of
Horace Mann, V. 288. Should be
established in rebel States, IX. 460;
XI. 154-159, 400, 407. A system of,
irrespective of color, XV. 275.
Condorcet, his treatise on progress,
II. 112. On a slave-master, V. 54.
On Franklin's mission to Paris,
VIII. 7. On slavery, IX. 300. On
republican government, X. 199.
Confederation of the United States,

formation and weakness of, VII.
503-505; XII. 213 et seq.
Confiscation of property in war, VII.
35; XIII. 13-15. Authorities re-
specting, VII. 36 et seq.; XIII. 13–
15. Within national jurisdiction,
VII. 38-40; XIII. 19-21, 25-27,
beyond same, VII. 40-44. History
of, VII. 53-69; especially in
France, VII. 55-58; and in Revo-
lutionary War, VII. 59-69. And
emancipation, should be employed
against Rebels, VII. 71, 74-77, 128.
Congregate System of prison disci-
pline. See Auburn System.
Congress, Mr. Summer's refusal to be

a candidate for, I. 330. Its power
over armies, I. 354; and over the
militia, I. 354; III. 217, 222–226.
Mr. Sumner accepts Free-Soil nomi-
nation for, II. 149. Modes of pre-
venting war discussed in, II. 254,
255. Has no power to establish
slavery, III 106, 126, 129; VI. 412,
-or to legislate concerning fugi-
tives from service, III. 106, 127,
129, 148; VIII. 144. Actions of 1st,
in regard to slavery, III. 123, 317.
Provisions of Convention of 1787 for
powers of, III. 149-154. Cannot
interfere with slavery in States,
III. 156, 317; V. 264, 269; VII.

26. Can prohibit slavery in Terri-
tories, III. 321; V. 121, 264, 269.
Has sole power to abrogate treaties,
IV. 102, 112. Can admit Kansas
at once, IV. 217. Should over-
throw usurpation in Kansas, IV.
245. Conduct of slave-masters in,
V. 84-99. War-powers of, against
slavery, VI. 18; VII. 45, 128;
VIII. 365. Power of, over rebel
States, VI. 302-305, 383; VII. 120,
493; IX. 11, 461; XI. 29, 45, 398;
XIII. 361,- sources of above pow-
er, VI. 302-305, 383; VII. 534-
539; IX. 17-22, 462-465; X. 124–
127, 325 et seqq.; XI. 161; XII. 528-
531. Can make Treasury notes a
legal tender, VI. 321-330. Can
abolish slavery in District of Co-
lumbia, VI. 396, 419; is respon-
sible for same, VI. 403, 418. Can
appropriate money to ransom
slaves, VI. 419. Testimony to
intervention of, for ransom of Al-
gerine slaves, VI. 424-429, 431-
434. Usage of, in enrolling bills,
VI. 510. Should confiscate prop-
erty and liberate slaves of Rebels,
VII. 71, 146. Achievements of
37th, VII. 144, 205. Protests
against final adjournments of, VII.
176; IX. 55; XI. 168, 352, 420.
Chancellor Kent on executive
power of, VII. 500; IX. 22. Su-
premacy of, over States, VII. 511-
516. Exclusion of colored testi-
mony recognized by, VIII. 177.
Its powers over slavery, VIII. 364–
370, 383; IX. 194-197. Must de-
termine readmission of rebel
States, VIII. 470; IX. 11, 16-22.
Summer sessions of, IX. 55 et seq.
Can ratify executive acts, IX. 203;
judicial decision proving same, IX.
203. Judicial decisions on its pow-
er to regulate commerce between
States, IX. 245-249: X. 445. Story
on its power to establish post-roads,
IX. 249, 252. Power and duty of,

to grant equal rights to colored
persons, X. 124-127, 211-219, 324-
337; XI. 30, 35-38; XII. 184, 245,
436; XIII. 34; XIV. 278–282, 384-
386, 418, 424-436, 438. Authori-
ties respecting powers of, under
the Constitution, X. 216, 273, 278;
XIII. 359; XIV. 429. Power of,
to counteract the cattle-plague, X.
425; to provide against cholera
from abroad, X. 435; and to make
a ship-canal at Niagara, X. 475.
The one-man power vs, XI. 1.
Power of, to require free schools
in rebel States, XI. 160. Powers of
the two Houses of, in absence of
a quorum, XI. 365. President
Johnson's defiance of, XII. 355.
Power of, to require conditions for
admission of States, XII. 419, 428;
XIII. 333-335, — objections to same
refuted, XII. 420-436. Eligibility
of colored citizens to, XII. 439.
Judicial decisions on political pow-
ers of, XII. 530. Its treatment
of claims for losses by Revolution-
ary War and War of 1812, XIII.
25-28. Powers of, to prohibit ine-
quality, caste, and oligarchy of
the skin, XIII. 34. Admission of
Virginia to representation in, XIII.
204. Power and duty of, to protect
Reconstruction, XIII. 208, 356–362.
Not pledged by Reconstruction
Acts to admit rebel States, XIII.
208-210, 224-226. Power of, over
national banks, XIII. 293–296. Ad-
mission of Mississippi to represen-
tation in, XIII. 331; and of Geor-
gia, XIII. 353.

Congress, Continental, on object of
the Revolution, III. 111; V. 114;
X. 174; XII. 215. New govern-
ments arranged by, VII. 530. Tes-
timony of, to rights of colored per-
sons, IX 280; X. 189. Resolutions
and addresses of, quoted, X. 170.
Debate in, on fisheries, XI. 342 et
seq. Meeting of the, XII. 210.

[ocr errors]

Congress of Nations, a substitute for
war, I. 51; II. 262, 393. Suggested
by Henry IV. of France, II. 233;
XIV. 65. Advocated by Grotius
and others, II. 233, — by William
Penn, II. 235,- by the Abbé Saint-
Pierre, II. 236; XIV. 65,-by Rous-
seau, II. 239; XIV. 65,- by Ger-
man writers, especially Kant. II.
241-245; XIV. 65-68,- by Ben-
tham, II. 245, by the Peace Con-
gress at Brussels, II. 251, - by the
legislature of Massachusetts and
in Congress, II. 255, — and by M.
Bouvet in France and Arnold Ruge
in Germany, II. 256.
Conkling, Roscoe, Senator from New

York, letter of, indorsing Reming-

ton and Sons, XV. 28.

Connecticut, valley of the, VII. 249.
Conscription, Mr. Monroe on, I. 355.

Exemption of clergymen from,
VII. 303.

Conservatism, true, defined, II. 126,
137; III. 79. False, II. 126.
Consols, should not be established in
United States, XIII. 287.
Constitution of the United States,
does not prevent abolition of
slavery, I. 310. Amendments to,
allowable, I. 311; III. 101. Au-
thors of, did not believe slavery
would be perpetual, I. 311; II. 79,
292; V. 202; X. 196,-their dec-
larations against slavery, I. 312;
II. 78, 293; III. 107-110; V. 115,
201; VIII. 136. Foundation of the
party of freedom, II. 76. Opposed
to Slave Power, II. 78. Purpose
and character of, as expressed by
the preamble, II. 78; III. 106; V.
306; VII. 507; VIII. 125, 361; X.
175, 304; XII. 223. Disarms sep-
arate States, II. 228. Does not
authorize slavery, II. 292; III.
106, 126, 542; V. 202, 269; VIII.
360-363, 370. Rules for interpret-
ing, III. 106-113, 162; VII. 80,
171; X. 219, 383; XII. 241, 284;

XIV. 385, 424 et seq., 460, 462.
Gives no power to Congress to
establish slavery, III. 126; VI. 412.
Original compromises of, III. 134;
VIII. 134. Clause in, on surrender
of fugitives from service, III. 133,
186; VIII. 121. Must be obeyed
by each public officer as he under-
stands it, III. 375, 465; authori-
ties declaring above rule, III. 375-
377, 465. Power of the Supreme
Court to interpret, III. 466–468.
Interpretation of its clause on privi-
leges of citizens, III. 534–537;
XIV. 386, 431. Its clause on rev-
enue bills a compromise between
large and small States, IV. 84; in-
terpretation of same, IV. 87, 91.
On treaties, IV. 101; XIV. 231.
Does not authorize slavery in Ter-
ritories, IV. 156; V. 118, 226; VII.
540; VIII. 369. Nowhere recog-
nizes property in man, V. 13, 111,
249; VIII. 361. Secures right of
petition to the people, V. 182. The
guide of United States citizens, V.
275. Proposed amendment to, in
favor of slavery, V. 442; VI. 90.
Requires loyalty as a qualification
for a Senator, VI. 351; XII. 258-
260. Sacredness of oath to support,
VI. 359. Does not sanction slav-
ery in District of Columbia, VI.
403, 413. Limitations of rights of
sovereignty against criminals in,
VII. 25-30. Does not limit war-
powers of Congress, VII. 45, 71,
131-138, 183-185, 216. Opposition
to its adoption, VII. 508: X. 305;
XII. 225. Sources of power over
slavery in, VIII. 364-370. Its pro-
visions for supremacy of national
government, XII. 223. Does not
recognize any distinction of color,
XII. 431; XIII. 42, 489; XIV. 401.
Its allotment of the war-power,
XIV. 228. All statutes and legis-
lation must conform to, XIV. 406.
Story on its prohibition of interfer-

ence with religion, XIV. 444. Does
not forbid requirement of equal
rights in churches, XIV. 445-451.
Contrasted with the Declaration of
Independence, XIV. 457, 460.
Constitutional Amendment defend-
ing liberty, protects all, III. 128;
VI. 415; VIII. 367–369. Abolish-
ing slavery, VIII. 385 et seq. : form
of same considered, VIII. 390–401;
XI. 55-58. Rebel States not need-
ed to ratify a, IX. 233, 313, 473,
491; X. 31, 62; XII. 255. Quorum
of States necessary in adoption of
a, IX. 489: Bishop on meaning of
above rule, IX. 491; XII. 255.
Abolishing slavery, adoption of,
X. 30: enforcement of same, X.
113, 215-218, 273-276, 310, 333-
335; XIII. 46; XIV. 384, 427-430.
Not proper to secure colored suf-
frage, XI. 357; XIII. 49-51. With-
drawal of assent to a, by a State,
XII. 253. See Blaine Amendment,
Fifteenth Amendment, and Four-
teenth Amendment.
Consular Pupils, VIII. 223.
Consuls, VI. 463; VIII. 226. Author-
ities respecting, VI. 464, 468.
Contraband of War, despatches in-
cluded in, by English authorities,
VI. 202, 205, but not by Amer-
ican or all Continental authorities,
VI. 202-204. American rules in
regard to, VI. 206-209. Should
be abolished, VI. 216.
Convention, National, of 1787, decla-
rations on slavery in, II. 293; III.
107-109; V. 115, 201; VIII. 136.
Meeting and early labors of, III.
136; XII. 219. Provides for sur-
render of fugitives from service,
III. 138; VIII. 134. Its provisions
for the powers of Congress, III. 149
-154. Did not empower Congress to
legislate for surrender of fugitives
from service, III. 153. Debates in,
on origination of money bills, IV.
84-87, 88 et seq.; on paper money,

-

VI. 323; on taxing slaves, VII.
94. Object of, VII. 505, 506; XII.
225. Discussion of State rights in,
VII. 509 et seq.; IX. 257; X. 305;
XII. 221 et seq. Debates in, on
guaranty of republican govern-
ment, X. 140; on establishment
of national government, XII. 220-
222; on suspension of the Presi-
dent, XII. 275,- and on equality
of States, XII. 422-424. Story on
same, XII. 425.
Conventions, political, obligations
imposed by, XV. 170.
Conveyances, public, open to all by
law, XIV. 390. Authorities prov-
ing same, XIV. 390–392.

Conway, Martin F., letter to, IV.

Crittenden Compromise, incidents
and notes on the, V. 437-453.
Its purport, V. 437-439, 469 et seq.;
VI. 30. Speech on a Massachusetts
petition in favor of, V. 468. Con-
demned, V. 469, 482.
Crittenden Resolution, V. 499; IX.
90.

Cromwell, sends expedition against
Barbary States, I. 411. Interven-
tion of, for Continental Protest-
ants, VII. 384-387.

Cuba, duty of Spain towards, XIII.
118-120. Duty of United States
concerning, XIII. 120-124. Bel-
ligerency of, XIII. 122, 195.
Curran, John P., on freedom of
fugitive slaves in England, III.
510.

386.
Coolie Trade, denunciation of the, Currency, the national banks and the,

XI. 82.

Cooper, J. Fenimore, the novelist,
III. 43.

Copyright, international, XII. 270.
Coquerel, Athanase, XIV. 311.
Coquerel, Athanase, fils, XIV. 311.
Cotton, cultivation of, favorable to
slavery, V. 202; VI. 82. Tax on,
VII. 84.

Court, different meanings of the word,
XII. 321 et seq.

VIII. 419. Benefits of an improved,
VIII. 428, 432. Circulation of, in
1860 and 1867, XII. 475. Inflation
of, XII. 476. Contraction of, XII.
477; XIII. 268. Remarks on the,
XIII. 184. Redistribution of, XIII.
254. Compound-interest notes for,
XIII. 257-259. Need of simplify-
ing, by withdrawing greenbacks
and making bank-notes convert-
ible, XIII. 260, 270-277.

Courts, mixed, defence of, VI. 483- Custom-house Oaths, abolition of, IV.
485. See Prize Courts.

Covode, John, Representative from
Pennsylvania, speech on death of,
XIV. 164.

Cowley, Abraham, XII. 15. His
prophecy concerning America,

XII. 17.

Crete, sympathy with, XI. 426.
Crime against Kansas, the, IV. 125.
Threatens war, IV. 140. Slave
Power the author of, IV. 142. Its
origin and extent, IV. 151-184.
Apologies for, refuted, IV. 184-207.
Remedies proposed for, IV. 207-
217. Public opinion aroused
against, IV. 245. Appendix to
speech on, IV. 257.

441. Character of, VI. 360.

[blocks in formation]

ises of, must be fulfilled, IX. 428;
X. 128; XII. 547; XIII, 220, 491.
It made a new nation, XII. 211.
Recognizes no distinction of color,
XII. 431; XIII. 43, 482, 489;
XIV. 401. Degraded by limita-
tions on equal rights, XIV. 375.
All statutes and legislation must
conform to, XIV. 496. Its import-
ance defended, XIV. 456–461. Ban-
croft on, XIV. 457, 458. John
Adams on celebration of, XIV.
458.

tucky, remarks on death of, XV.
261.
Davis, Henry Winter, obituary no-
tice of, X. 104. Tribute of colored
persons to, X. 107 et seq.
Davis, Jefferson, his definition of
slavery, V. 10, 24. Defends duel-
ling, V. 89. The chief of the Re-
bellion, VI. 261. On fugitive
slaves, VIII. 171. On the national
government, IX. 391. On begin-
ning of the Civil War, IX. 396.
Trial of, X. 111. On the doctrine
of equality, XIV. 376.
Debate, limitation of, in Senate, VI. Democracy, Mr. Sumner's belief in,

293.

Debt, public, of European nations be-
fore 1845, I. 72. Of Great Britain
in 1842, I. 73. See National Debt
and Rebel Debt.
Decatur, Stephen, frees slaves in Al-
giers, I. 457; VI. 435.
Declaration of Independence, founda-

tion of the party of freedom, II. 76,
85. Be true to the, II. 278. Declares
all men equal, II. 291, 340; III.
111; V. 114; IX. 372; X. 173, 299;
XIII. 482; XIV. 460. Declares
equality in rights only, II. 341;
III. 293; XIV. 453. And the Con-
stitution, our two title-deeds, II.
441; XII. 239; XIII. 489. Must
be employed to interpret the Con-
stitution, III. 111; X. 219; XII.
241; XIV. 425, 460, 462; XV. 69.
On source of authority of govern-
ment, IV. 232. The first declara-
tion of human rights, V. 251, 318.
Its limitations on popular sover-
eignty, V. 252, 320; XIII. 218.
The guide of United States citizens,
V. 275. Assaults upon, V. 322;
XIV. 452-455. J. Q. Adams on, V.
323-325. Promises of the, IX. 367,
371 et seq., 429; X. 173. Lincoln
on, IX. 381, 383-389, 392; XIII.
495-498; XIV. 376-378, 454. Ste-
phen A. Douglas on, IX. 382, 383,

De Foe, on America, XII. 24 et seq.

III. 98.

Democratic Party, influenced by
Slave Power, II. 141; V. 216. Re-
jects Wilmot Proviso in 1848, II.
141. Not opposed to slavery, III.
461; IV. 73. And Republican party,
IX. 68. In 1864, IX. 73. Its sup-
port of slavery, IX. 74.
of, in 1864, IX. 77, 128. Proposes
to acknowledge Slave Power, IX.

115.

Platform

Frauds committed by, IX.
135. In 1868, the Rebel party,
XII. 511, 524. Leaders of, XII.
512. Opposed to equal rights for
freedmen, XIII. 102; XIV. 3. A
party of repudiation, XIII. 104.
Dangers from its attaining power,
XIV. 87. Its position in 1872, XV.
170, 250. Its support of Greeley,
XV. 184 et seq., 192, 197, 212, 242-
246, 248. Its fidelity to Republi-
can principles in 1872, XV. 242;
testimony to same, XV. 243–245;
motives for same, XV. 246–249.
Denmark, navy of, in 1837, I. 76.

Adopts separate system in prisons,
I. 517. Treaty of, with United
States illegally abrogated in 1855,
IV. 100. Power of Congress to ter-
minate same, recognized by Mr.
Buchanan IV. 119.

Descartes, on progress in science, II.

105.

385; XIII. 494; XIV. 454. Prom- Diplomatic Representatives, rank of,

« PreviousContinue »