A Tour Through the Island of Jamaica: From the Western to the Eastern End, in the Year 1823

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Hunt and Clarke, 1826 - 352 pages
 

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Page 52 - Both thy bondmen, and thy bondmaids, which thou shalt have, shall be of the heathen that are round about you ; of them shall ye buy bondmen and bondmaids. Moreover of the children of the strangers that do sojourn among you, of them shall ye buy, and of their families that are with you, which they begat in your land : and they shall be your possession. And ye shall take them as an inheritance for your children after you, to inherit them for a possession; they shall be your bondmen for ever: but over...
Page 52 - And if a man smite his servant, or his maid, with a rod, and he die under his hand; he shall be surely punished. Notwithstanding, if he continue a day or two, he shall not be punished: for he is his money.
Page 52 - I love my master, my wife, and my children; I will not go out free...
Page 52 - If thou buy an Hebrew servant, six years he shall serve : and in the seventh he shall go out free for nothing. If he came in by himself, he shall go out by himself: if he were married, then his wife shall go out with him.
Page 52 - Then his master shall bring him unto the judges ; he shall also bring him to the door, or unto the door-post ; and his master shall bore his ear through with an awl ; and he shall serve him for ever.
Page 2 - ... celebration of ninth-night in form of pocomania' may well be the same word in slightly altered form and meaning. Williams has described a love-dance as it occurred in 1826 : They divided themselves into parties to dance, some before the gombays, in a ring, to perform a bolero or a sort of lovedance as it is called, where the gentlemen occasionally wiped the perspiration off the shining faces of their black beauties, who, in turn, performed the same service to the minstrel. An outdoor popular...
Page 1 - ... they again assembled on the lawn "before the house with then. gombays, bonjaws, and.' an ebo drum, made of a hollow tree, with a piece of sheepskin stretched over it.
Page 6 - ... eight or ten young girls marching before a man dressed up in a mask with a grey beard and long flowing hair, who carried the model of a house on his head. This house is called the Jonkanoo, and the bearer of it is generally chosen for his superior activity in dancing. . . . The girls also danced. . . . All this ceremony is certainly a commemoration of the deluge. The custom is African and religious, although the purpose is forgotten. Some writer, whose name I forget, says that the house is an...
Page 87 - Dea belubb'd, we gather together dis face congregation, because it horrible among all men not to take delight in hand for wantonness, lust, and appetite, like brute mule, dat hab no understanding. When de man cut down like guinea grass, he worship no more any body, but gib all him world's good to de debbil; and Garamighty tell him soul must come up into heab'n, where notting but glorio.
Page 52 - O the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of God ! how unsearchable are his judgments, and his ways past finding out ! For who hath known the mind of the Lord ? or who hath been his counsellor...

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