A Synopsis of the Bills of Exchange Acts of England and Wales: And the Colonies of Victoria, New South Wales, South Australia, Queensland, Western Australia, Tasmania and New Zealand

Front Cover
McCarren, Bird, 1892 - 80 pages

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 5 - A bill of exchange is an unconditional order in writing, addressed by one person to another, signed by the person giving it, requiring the person to whom it is addressed to pay on demand or at a fixed or determinable future time a sum certain in money to or to the order of a specified person, or to bearer.
Page 18 - That at the time it was negotiated to him he had no notice of any infirmity in the instrument or defect in the title of the person negotiating it.
Page 15 - But if any such instrument, after completion, is negotiated to a holder in due course, it is valid and effectual for all purposes in his hands, and he may enforce it as if it had been filled up strictly in accordance with the authority given and within a reasonable time.
Page 25 - Where a bill is addressed to two or more drawees who are not partners, presentment must be made to them all...
Page 19 - In the hands of any holder other than a holder in due course, a negotiable instrument is subject to the same defenses as if it were non-negotiable. But a holder who derives his title through a holder in due course, and who is not himself a party to any fraud or illegality affecting the instrument, has all the rights of such former holder in respect of all parties prior to the latter.
Page 14 - An acceptance to pay at a particular place is a general acceptance unless it expressly states that the bill is to be paid there only and not elsewhere.
Page 13 - The acceptance of a bill is the signification by the drawee of his assent to the order of the drawer. The acceptance must be in writing and signed by the drawee. It must not express that the drawee will perform his promise by any other means than the payment of money.
Page 15 - ... the delivery may be shown to have been conditional or for a special purpose only and not for the purpose of transferring the property in the instrument.
Page 33 - Where a party receives notice of dishonor, he has, after the receipt of such notice, the same time for giving notice to antecedent parties that the holder has after the dishonor.
Page 33 - Delay in making presentment for payment is excused when the delay is caused by circumstances beyond the control of the holder, and not imputable to his default, misconduct or negligence. When the cause of delay ceases to operate, presentment must be made with reasonable diligence.

Bibliographic information