The Authentic Life of William McKinley ...: Together with a Life Sketch of Theodore Roosevelt ...

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William McKinley was born at Niles, Ohio, in 1843, the son of William and Nancy Allison McKinley. He was a descendants of David McKinley (1756-1840), a Revolutionary War soldier. He married Ida Saxton, daughter of James A. Saxon, at Canton, Ohio, in 1871. They had two daughters, who died in childhood. He was elected the 25th president of the United States in 1896 and 1900 and was assassinated at Buffalo, New York, in 1901. Theodore Roosevelt became the 26th president of the United States after his death.

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Page vii - Besides, this Duncan Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been So clear in his great office, that his virtues Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against The deep damnation of his taking-off...
Page 372 - The beauty of Israel is slain upon thy high places : how are the mighty fallen ! Tell it not in Gath, publish it not in the streets of Askelon ; lest the daughters of the Philistines rejoice, lest the daughters of the uncircumcised triumph.
Page x - Nearer, my God, to thee, Nearer to thee; E'en though it be a cross That raiseth me, Still all my song shall be, || : Nearer, my God, to thee,:|| Nearer to thee.
Page 230 - Whereas, the abhorrent conditions which have existed for more than three years in the Island of Cuba, so near our own borders, have shocked the moral sense of the people of the United States...
Page 115 - Sleep sweetly, tender heart, in peace : Sleep, holy spirit, blessed soul, While the stars burn, the moons increase, And the great ages onward roll. Sleep till the end, true soul and sweet. Nothing comes to thee new or strange. Sleep full of rest from head to feet ; Lie still, dry dust, secure of change.
Page 309 - The period of exclusiveness is past. The expansion of our trade and commerce is the pressing problem. Commercial wars are unprofitable. A policy of good will and friendly trade relations will prevent reprisals. Reciprocity treaties are in harmony with the spirit of the times; measures of retaliation are not.
Page 47 - She openeth her mouth with wisdom ; And in her tongue is the law of kindness.
Page 309 - If perchance some of our tariffs are no longer needed for revenue or to encourage and protect our industries at home, why should they not be employed to extend and promote our markets abroad?
Page 268 - That it will levy no higher harbor dues on vessels of another nationality frequenting any port in such " sphere " than shall be levied on vessels of its own nationality, and no higher railroad charges over lines built, controlled, or operated within its
Page vii - With his surcease success; that but this blow Might be the be-all and the end-all here, But here, upon this bank and shoal of time, We'd jump the life to come. But in these cases We still have judgment here; that we but teach Bloody instructions, which, being taught, return To plague the inventor; this even-handed justice Commends the ingredients of our poisoned chalice To our own lips.

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