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were being said, industry of all kinds, in every city of the Republic, was absolutely suspended. Of all the tributes paid to the dead President, none approached in majesty and impressiveness that utter abandonment of all occupation. From the Atlantic to the Pacific not a wheel turned in any mill, nor on any railroad, for the five minutes of that final ceremony. Engineers, firemen, conductors, crews, paused for a period in their occupation, turned devoutly toward the little town where the last sad rites were being performed, and sent their thoughts to join in the hushed farewell. That stopping of America, that pause of the United States, that wait of every citizen while the body of one dead was laid away, is impressive past all power of description. Of it a famous author has said: “Five minutes taken out of life! Five minutes snatched from activity, lost to productive effort, subtracted from material struggle ! It is an amazing thing in the most energetic, the most thrifty nation on the face of the earth. And yet that five minutes, taken from the total money value of the day, brought in return a sense of tenderness, of fratermity with all the other millions waiting, bowed and reverent, which nothing else could have produced. That five minutes was the best investment that busy lives could possibly make. It brought them nearer all that was noble in the life that had been ended. It gave them a better confidence in the citizenship of America. It enacted anew the law of love, and blessed with its swift ministrations the purer patriotism. Silence and tears for the victim of malignant hate; new resolves for the upholding of law and the extension of real liberty; unbounded faith in the stability of our republican institutions; an impressive warning to the foes of order—such was the moment's meaning to every loyal American, and to the world. “Eighty millions of people, gathered about a bit of earth, six feet by two! That is the spectacle bought at a price so matchless.”

CHAPER XIX.

SUCCEEDS TO THE PRESIDENCY.

THEODORE ROOSEVELT TAKES OATH OF OFFICE-INFORMED OF HIS CHIEF’s DEATH WHILE HUNTING IN THE ADIRONDACKS-SOLEMN SCENES AT THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE SUBLIME OBLIGATION.—DECLARES HE WILL CARRY OUT MC KINLEY's POLICY.

Theodore Roosevelt became President of the United States on Saturday, September 14, 1901. The oath of office was administered by Judge John R. Hazel, of the United States District Court, at 3:32 P.M., in Buffalo, New York, in the residence of Mr. Ansley Wilcox, a personal friend of the Vice-President, who had been his host earlier in the week when the physicians thought President McKinley would recover from the wounds inflicted by the assassin.

When the President was shot Colonel Roosevelt was at Isle La Motte, near Burlington, Wermont. He had just finished an address when he was informed of the dreadful tragedy. He hastened at once to the side of his wounded chief,

where he remained until the physicians, deceived

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