Selections from American Authors: A Reading Book for School and Home. Franklin, Adams, Cooper, Longfellow

Front Cover
Samuel Eliot
Taintor Brothers, Merrill & Company, 1879 - 410 pages

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 83 - I long to hear that you have declared an independency. And, by the way, in the new code of laws 1 Samuel Quincy. which I suppose it will be necessary for you to make, I desire you would remember the ladies and be more generous and favorable to them than your ancestors. Do not put such unlimited power into the hands of the husbands. Remember, all men would be tyrants if they could.
Page 100 - You will think me transported with enthusiasm, but I am not. I am well aware of the toil, and blood and treasure, that it will cost...
Page 16 - It was one by the village clock, When he galloped into Lexington. He saw the gilded weathercock Swim in the moonlight as he passed, And the meeting-house windows, blank and bare. Gaze at him with a spectral glare, As if they already stood aghast At the bloody work they would look upon.
Page 16 - So through the night rode Paul Revere ; And so through the night went his cry of alarm To every Middlesex village and farm, — A cry of defiance and not of fear, A voice in the darkness, a knock at the door, And a word that shall echo...
Page 28 - I took a delight in it, practised it continually, and grew very artful and expert in drawing people, even of superior knowledge, into concessions, the consequences of which they did not foresee, entangling them in difficulties out of which they could not extricate themselves, and so obtaining victories that neither myself nor my cause always deserved.
Page 14 - By the trembling ladder, steep and tall, To the highest window in the wall, Where he paused to listen and look down A moment on the roofs of the town, And the moonlight flowing over all.
Page 40 - Street wharf, near the boat I came in, to which I went for a draught of the river water ; and being filled with one of my rolls, gave the other two to a woman and her child that came down the river in the boat with us, and were waiting to go farther.
Page 70 - Turn, gentle hermit of the dale, And guide my lonely way To where yon taper cheers the vale With hospitable ray. " For here forlorn and lost I tread, With fainting steps and slow ; Where wilds immeasurably spread, Seem lengthening as I go.'" " Forbear, my son," the hermit cries, " To tempt the dangerous gloom ; For yonder faithless phantom flies To lure thee to thy doom. " Here to the houseless child of want My door is open still ; And though my portion is but scant, I give it with good will.
Page 55 - Away went Gilpin, neck or nought ; Away went hat and wig ; He little dreamt, when he set out, Of running such a rig.
Page 20 - To which King Robert answered with a sneer, " I am the King, and come to claim my own From an impostor, who usurps my throne!" And suddenly, at these audacious words, Up sprang the angry guests, and drew their swords; The Angel answered, with unruffled brow, " Nay, not the King, but the King's Jester, thou...

Bibliographic information