Christian Thought, Volume 11

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W.B. Ketcham, 1894
 

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Page 129 - If we take in our hand any volume; of divinity or school metaphysics, for instance; let us ask, Does it contain any abstract reasoning concerning quantity or number'} No. Does it contain any experimental reasoning concerning matter of fact and existence? No. Commit it then to the flames: for it can contain nothing but sophistry and illusion.
Page 169 - O foolish men, and slow of heart to believe in all that the prophets have spoken ! Behoved it not the Christ to suffer these things, and to enter into his glory?
Page 367 - Searching what, or what manner of time the Spirit of Christ which was in them did signify, when it testified beforehand the sufferings of Christ, and the glory that should follow.
Page 365 - I have many things to say and to judge of you: but he that sent me is true; and I speak to the world those things which I have heard of him.
Page 365 - I will raise them up a Prophet from among their brethren, like unto thee, and will put My words in His mouth ; and He shall speak unto them all that I shall command Him.
Page 43 - ... the Word that was in the beginning with God, and was God, and dwelt from eternity in the bosom of the Father.
Page 86 - And hath raised us up together, and made us sit together in heavenly places in Christ Jesus: That in the ages to come he might show the exceeding riches of his grace in his kindness toward us through Christ Jesus.
Page 365 - For I have not spoken of myself; but the Father which sent me, he gave me a commandment, what I should say, and what I should speak.
Page 407 - Now I lay me down to sleep, I pray the Lord my soul to keep ; If I should die before I wake, I pray the Lord my soul to take ; And this I ask for Jesus
Page 130 - To do this effectually it is necessary to be fully possessed of only two beliefs: the first, that the order of nature is ascertainable by our faculties to an extent which is practically unlimited; the second, that our volition counts for something as a condition of the course of events.

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