The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Volumes 1-11; Volume 12, Parts 1-3; Volumes 13-16; Volume 17, Parts 1-2; Volume 18; Volume 19, Parts 1-2; Volumes 20-22; Volume 23, Parts 1-2; Volume 24, Parts 1-3; Volume 25, Parts 1-2; Volume 26, Parts 1-2; Volume 27, Parts 1-3; Volume 28, Parts 1-2; Volume 29, Parts 1-2; Volume 30; Volume 31, Parts 1-3; Volume 32, Parts 1-3; Volume 33; Volume 34, Parts 1-4; Volume 35, Parts 1-2; Volume 36, Parts 1-3; Volume 37, Parts 1-2; Volume 38, Parts 1-5; Volume 39, Parts 1-3; Volume 40, Parts 1-3; Volume 41, Parts 1-4; Volume 42, Parts 1-3; Volume 43, Parts 1-2; Volume 44; Volume 45, Parts 1-2; Volume 46, Parts 1-3; Volume 47, Parts 1-3; Volume 48, Parts 1-2; Volume 49, Parts 1-2; Volume 50, Parts 1-2; Volume 51, Parts 1-2; Volumes 52-53; Volume 56; Volumes 58-59; Volume 62; Volume 81; Volume 83; Volumes 101-102; Volumes 118-121; Volumes 124-125

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1972
Found also in the House Miscellaneous documents of the 52 to the 56th Congress./ Each number has special index. Inserted in each volume: Additions and corrections ... Washington, Govt. Print. Off., 1902./ Series 1,v. 1-53, series 3,v. 1-5, and series 4,v. 1-3 include "Alternate designations of organizations mentioned." /Vol 54-55 of series 1 (serial no. 112-113)"HAVE NOT BEEN PUBLISHED, AND NO MATERIAL FOR THEM IS IN HAND." cf. General Index, p. xi. Series 2,v. 1 (serial no. 114) with imprint 1894, was not issued until 1898./ Edited in the War Records Office, 1880-July 1899; in the Record and Pension Office, July 1899-1901 Robert N. Scott compiled and edited v. 1-18, 1880-87, and also collected the greater part of the material for v. 19-36, 1887-91. After his death in 1887 the work was continued by Henry M. Lazelle, 1887-89, and by a board of publication, 1889-99, consisting of George B. Davis, 1889-97, Leslie J. Perry, 1889-99, Joseph W. Kirkley, 1889-99,and Fred C. Ainsworth, 1898-99; from 1889-1901 edited by Fred C. Ainsworth and Joseph W. Kirkley. A digital reproduction made from a copy held by Cornell University is available from Cornell University's Making of America Web Site.
 

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Page 4 - ... and now beware of rashness. Beware of rashness, but with energy and sleepless vigilance go forward and give us victories.
Page 4 - I have placed you at the head of the Army of the Potomac. Of course I have done this upon what appear to me to be sufficient reasons, and yet I think it best for you to know that there are some things in regard to which I am not quite satisfied with you.
Page 4 - I have heard, in such a way as to believe it, of your recently saying, that both the army and the government needed a dictator. Of course it was not for this, but in spite of it, that I have; given you the command. Only those generals who gain successes can set up dictators. What I now ask of you is military success, and I will risk the dictatorship.
Page 4 - Only those generals who gain successes can set up dictators. What I now ask of you is military success, and I will risk the dictatorship. The government will support you to the utmost of its ability, which is neither more nor less than it has done and will do for all commanders. I much fear that the spirit which you have aided to infuse into the army, of criticising their commander and withholding confidence from him, will now turn upon you.
Page 142 - No noncommissioned officer or private can give his parole except through an officer. Individual paroles not given through an officer are not only void, but subject the individuals giving them to the punishment of death as deserters. The only admissible exception is where individuals, properly separated from their commands, have suffered long confinement without the possibility of being paroled through an officer.
Page 4 - You are ambitious — which, within reasonable bounds, does good rather than harm; but I think that, during General Burnside's command of the army, you have taken counsel of your ambition and thwarted him as much as you could, in which you did a great wrong to the country, and to a most meritorious and honorable brother officer.
Page 63 - No sentence of a court-martial appointed by the commander of a division or of a separate brigade of troops, directing the dismissal of an officer, shall be carried into execution until it shall have been confirmed by the general commanding the army in the field to which the division or brigade belongs.
Page 791 - Providence, are now lost to us. But while we mourn his death, we feel that his spirit still lives, and will inspire the whole army with his indomitable courage and unshaken confidence in God as our hope and strength. Let his name be a watchword to his corps, who have followed him to victory on so many fields. Let his officers and soldiers emulate his invincible determination to do everything in the defence of our beloved country.
Page 4 - The short time that he has directed your movements has not been fruitful of victory, or any considerable advancement of our lines, but it has again demonstrated an amount of courage, patience, and endurance that under more favorable circumstances would have accomplished great results.
Page 477 - Sir : When I wrote on the 7th, I had an impression that possibly by an early movement you could get some advantage from the supposed facts that the enemy's communications were disturbed, and that he was somewhat deranged in position.