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A Monthly Magazine, devoted to the spread of

Bible Truth.

"IN THE MORNING BOW THY SEED, AND IN THE EVENING WITHHOLD NOT THINE HAND; FOR THOU KNOWEST

NOT WHETHER SHALL PROSPER, EITHER THIS OR THAT, OR WHETHER THEY BOTH SHALL BE ALIKE GOOD.".

CONTENTS.

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THB BLESSING OF NAPHTALI
"IF I PERISH, I PERISH. I WILL GO IN UNTO THE KING*"
THE BURNING AND SHINING LAMP
ANSWERS TO PRAYER
DISTINGUISHING MERCY
REMINISCENCES OF THE LORD'S GOODNESS
THE KNOWLEDGE OF CHRIST MORE PRECIOUS THAN GOLD..
ONE OF MANY; OR, THE LAMENTATIONS OF A BEREAVED

FATHER
THE ROMISH REVIVAL
THE SPIRIT OF THE CHURCH OF ROME
THE INCREASE OF RITUALISM
LETTERS FOR THE YOUNG.–No. XXXiỹ.
EASTER
NOTICES OF Books, &c.
LUTHER AND THE DYING STUDENT

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London :
HOULSTON AND SONS, 7, PATERNOSTER BUILDINGS ;

And E. WILMSHURST, Blackheath, S.E.

PRICE ONE PENNY,

W. H. * L. Collingridge, Printers, City Press, London.

NOTICES TO CORRESPONDENTS. RECEIVED.-W. H. R.; E. B.; S. G.; E. L. W.; J. S.; A Reader ; R. G.; P.T.; F. W. S.; L. F.; H. R.; B. B.; Daisy ; B. R. ; Lydia; M. A. R.; Ebenezer ; W. V.; A. A.; W. G.; F. R.; M. A. M. ; D. F.; A. E.; A. G. B.; F. M. ; W.B.; M. E. N,; R. B.; J.H. T.

Books RECEIVED.- "The Banner of Truth” (De Baun, New York), “ New York Times," "The Witness.” (Sydney); "The Lord's Dove," a Sermon by E. Carr (3d. J. Gadsby, 18, Bouverie Street, London, E.C.; Tourle, Brighton); “The History of a Candidate for Confirmation,” twenty-five for 8d. (W. K. Bloom, Tract Depository, Castle Street, Holborn, London, E.C.); “ Episcopal Perfidy; or, Plain Words about the Mackonochie Scandal” (One Penny. W. Wileman, 34, Bouverie Street, London, E.C.). See Notice of the three last-named on page 90.

PRINTING FUND.—The Editor again tenders his sincere and hearty thanks to those warm-hearted helpers who sympathize with his endeavour to scatter broadcast suitable reading for young and old, and he hopes that, while atheists and Romanists are energetically working against the best interests of the rising race, and of men in general, all lovers of truth will strive to help to circulate that teaching which accords with the Word of God. The following are gratefully acknowledged :Mr. F. Paffard, 108.; Miss Coode, 10s.; A Colchester Friend, 10s.; Anonymous (Salop), 4s.

AGED PILGRIMS' FRIEND SOCIETY.--The Editor returns his sincere thanks to the many friends who sent him votes for the Camberwell Asylum Election, and he is pleased to say that both the cases he was interested in were successful. He hopes that all who can will reserve their votes for him next June, in behalf of a needy candidate for the Ten Guinea Pension.-Miss Coode, 218.

THE Editor hopes that his numerous friends will excuse any seeming neglect on his part of private correspondence, inasmuch as he has been suffering for many weeks with a distressing cold and great prostration of strength, which have rendered him almost unable to hold on in his work. “Brethren, pray for us.”

We hope that all praying souls will unite in entreating the Lord to arise, and in mercy prevent our senators from adopting means to facilitate the admission of avowed atheists into our national councils. If those who contemn God are thus pandered to, we may expect His frown.

OUR ANNUAL VOLUMES:- These, we are happy to say, find increasing favour year by year, and we trust our friends will endeavour to make them known still more widely, as the greater the sale, the more we shall be encouraged. Both GLEANER and SOWER form excellent gift-books, as they contain an abundance of useful reading. There are many families to whom a volume might be useful were they presented with one.

We also have some back numbers of GLEANER and SOWER, which can be had at three shillings per hundred, or we would forward them to schools and other places for free distribution, where we know they would be gladly received, if friends would kindly remit the cost of a few to us for this purpose.

ADVERTISEMENT CHARGES IN THE SOWER AND LITTLE GLEANER.-Twenty words, 18.; every additional twelve words, 6d. A serieg at a reduction. Advertise. ments must be forwarded by the 20th of each month to appear in next issue.

All Advertisements and orders for Magazines to be addressed to Mr. E. WILMSHURST, Bookseller, Blackheath, London, S.E. P. 0. Orders to be made payable at Blackheath Village.

ALL communications for the GLEANER and SOWER should be addressed to Mr. T. HULL, 117, High Street, Hastings. Post Office Orders may be made payable to him at the BRANCH OFFICE, High Street.

WANTED, an Intelligent and Trustworthy LAD, living in London, first as Errand Boy and Collector, and to learn the Bookselling and Publishing. WILLIAM WILEMAN, 34, Bouverie Street, Fleet Street.

THE BLESSING OF NAPHTALI.*

(DEUTERONOMY xxxiii. 23.) A SLIGHT SKETCH OF SOME OF THE LORD'S DEALINGS WITH

EMMA L. MAURICE. God in creation is a God of variety; and, as the God of all grace, He is as various in His dealings with His people. We see it around us, we feel it in our own experience, and we read it in His Word. In no part of the latter is it so clearly defined as in the very varied blessings pronounced upon the tribes of Israel. The “ways” (Job xxvi. 14) of our Lord in providence as well as grace are there distinctly foreshown. Unstable Reuben, burden-bearing Issachar, victorious Gad, and blessed Joseph ; Zebulun bidden to rejoice in his going out, and Issachar in his keeping at home; Asher blessed with children, and Naphtali "satisfied with favour,” are blessed hints to God's chosen people down to the end of time. One or two, however, seem to stand out beyond the others as especially “blessed,” notably Joseph and Naphtali. How comprehensive in its perfection is that of the latter! How can any vessel of any size be more than full? “O Naphtali, satisfied with favour, and full with the blessing of the Lord.” This is the lot of perhaps few of the Lord's people in the present day, but was that in a remarkable degree of the subject of this notice.

Emma L. Maurice was born in 1807. Her eyes were opened to a sense of her lost condition as a sinner in God's sight when only seven years of age, the occasion, in the hand of the divine Spirit, being the death of a much-loved nurse. Her health even from childhood was bad. Long and varied attacks of illness were her frequent lot, but her diligence in study, in her earnest endeavours to make up for the lost time, was noticeable. She used to feel that, because she had received the “ love of the truth” early in life, it was as incumbent on her to improve her mind and use all the opportunities for study that were put within her reach as if it had not been so. Truly one thing only is "needful,” but many other things are right and desirable, and calculated to "adorn

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* This sketch, by permission of the author and publishers, is abridged, with very little alteration, from a most interesting book, entitled, “SeltSurrender," by M. P. Hack; published by Hodder and Stoughton. Is consists of a series of biographies, beginning with Anne Askew, who suffered martyrdom in 1546. Some of them are well worth perusal, especially that of Harriet Jukes.-E. M. No. 51, New SFRIES, MARCH, 1883.

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the doctrine of God our Saviour.” The Word says, “ Be pitiful, be courteous;” use hospitality, as well as “be careful for nothing." She suffered much from asthma before she was twenty, and having a dying elder sister to tend often concealed her nightly attacks from her family.

In February, 1826, she partook of the Lord's Supper for the first time. It was a day to be much-remembered, and her biographer says :-In a cottage where she dined after the service, she passed two happy hours in reading, prayer, and thanksgiving: At the evening service also, the hymns and prayers seemed for her alone, but the sermon on the “ afforded much food for meditation. On returning home, she sat in her invalid sister Anne's room. After a few words exchanged, silence reigned, Emma meditating on what she had heard and felt, but especially on these words, “ Peace I leave with you, My peace I give unto you : not as the world giveth, give I unto you. Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be afraid.” She says that the calm peacefulness of the sick room brought them to her mind, and during an hour-and-a-half spent beside her beloved sister, she feasted upon them. She adds, “I realized indeed that 'peace which passeth all understanding. A calm feeling of being dedicated (devoted, or set apart,' as the word means) to the Lord possessed my soul, and I rested on the arm of Jehovah. Unwillingly I left the sacred room to retire to rest, and, before I closed my eyes in slumber, again entreated the Lord to give me purity and holiness, by whatever means He might see necessary to employ. Yes, my heart said whatever means; and, though I trembled at the thought of what means might be employed, I again entreated the blessing most earnestly."

After uttering this petition, Emma fell asleep, and later awoke with difficulty of breathing. Thinking it was her usual asthma, she took a dose of ether, but it failed to alleviate the suffering. Her tender thought for Anne prevented her from disturbing the household, and in the morning it seemed to those who came to her, and saw her great struggles for breath, that she could not be restored. She said afterwards, "My mind was more than comforted during paroxysms of painful and dangerous oppressions of breath, by the assurance that the affliction was to purify me. Six weeks after, she wrote, “On the tenth day of my illness, my dear sister was worse, and, on the eleventh, left this wilderness for the paradise above. * Oh, how I longed, if but for one moment, to have looked upon her, even after death; but the Lord, in tender mercy, suffered not my desire to be accomplished. No; every

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There is a short account of this sister in the volume from which this is extracted.

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rebellious thought was graciously, most graciously, to be purged, and this severe discipline was necessary to do so.

Much weakness and suffering followed. Speaking of what she passed through during the winter of 1826-7, she says,

• Each one of His sweetest promises has been more abundantly fulfilled to me than language can express. Sometimes the sweet consolations so abounded that I was astonished to hear any say of my complaint, 'How distressing it must be !'” And again, in May, 1827, “The last six months have been the happiest of my life, for I have enjoyed the presence of my God in them. Oh, who can tell what that is ? What must heaven be, if this be only earth?

In the summer she was removed into the country. The anticipation of change of scene tried her. She loved her sick room, hallowed with her Lord's presence, and dreaded leaving it. Emma soon found, however, that He was not to be limited to place, for she writes, soon after, “• The peace of God which passeth all understanding.' Peace of God-truly it must pass all understanding; yet it is bestowed, felt, experienced, delighted in. Truly have I a goodly portion. The lines are fallen unto me' in more than 'pleasant places.'

In 1828 she writes" My earthly abode is about to be changed; perhaps, also, my pursuits and habits. I know not what is before me. My body, soul, and spirit, circumstances and

. lot, to the end of my life-my friends, my comforts, my earthly and spiritual all-I place in Thy hands to order for me. Take my heart, gracious Lord, and fill it with Thy love; my understanding, and fix it upon Thyself; my will, and make it Thine ; my desires, and let them all go out to Thee; my wants, and make them centre upon Thee; my time, and use it for Thy glory; my voice, my strength, all my bodily powers, and let them be for Thy service, in whatever way Thou choosost, by pain or ease, by health or illness, by ability or inability. Take my circumstances, and order them so as to maintain the nearest walk with Thee. My friends-yea, take them also, and make them to me what Thou wouldest have them to be-Thou, whose will is my sanctification.”

A few days after writing the above, Emma was removed to a new residence. Thus was every earthly nest stirred, that she might rest only in “the secret place of the Most High, and abide under the shadow of the Almighty.”

In February, 1829, the weight of illness was so overpowering, it seemed to those around as if the dear invalid could not survive from day to day. The suffering in the throat was very severe, and threatened saffocation. Her sympathy for those with her was very great. She sought continually to strengthen her sister's

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