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"Concerning method and time of payment” includes disputes about frequency of pay days, change of pay days, trading at company stores, etc.

The cause “concerning Saturday part holiday” includes disputes relating to small reductions of hours on Saturday, as well as disputes relating to a full half holiday. This cause shows what share the growing demand for a partial holiday on Saturday has in strikes and lockouts.

In the cause "concerning docking, fines, and charges” are classed disputes about docking or fines for poor work or for tardiness, disputes about charges for supplies or uniforms, disputes about being required to furnish tools or supplies, objections to compulsory doctor fees, etc.

A variety of causes are included under the general cause “concerning working conditions and rules.” Among them are objections to the rule compelling employees to board with employers; objections to change in method of doing work; objections to introduction of or change in machinery; objections to the task system and objections to certain shop rules (not involving union rules); here also are included demands for better ventilation, change in hour of beginning work, etc.

The cause “in sympathy with strikers and employees locked out, elsewhere," includes all strikes in which the employees have no direct grievance of their own, but stop their work that they may directly or indirectly aid employees of other establishments who are striking or who are locked out. For example, all employees in a particular trade in a city' may strike and tie up all work in that trade in an effort to force the support of their employers in bringing another employer to terms. To a great extent the strikers in a sympathetic strike are union men who are seeking to benefit members of their own or some other union. The question of unionism, however, is not directly an issue between them and their employers. This cause also includes protests against performing work for other establishments in which a strike or lockout is pending, protests against furnishing material to such establishments, etc. The group “other causes” includes all causes not elsewhere classi

In this group are found such causes as objection to withholding a part of wages as a guaranty, objection to signing contracts, objection to change in date of yearly scale, objection to subcontracting, objections to violation of agreement; also demands for enforcement of law in certain matters, for increase in the number of employees, for payment of wages overdue, etc. This group "other causes also includes a few strikes in which the causes were so imperfectly

fied.

In the tables of this report which present the data by geographical divisions, the classification indicated below has been followed: North Atlantic Division:

North Central Division-('oncluded. Connecticut.

Nebraska. Maine.

North Dakota. Massachusetts.

Ohio. New Hampshire.

South Dakota. New Jersey.

Wisconsin. New York.

South Central Division: Pennsylvania.

Alabama. Rhode Island.

Arkansas. Vermont.

Indian Territory. South Atlantic Division:

Kentucky. Delaware.

Louisiana. District of Columbia.

Mississippi. Florida.

Oklahoma. Georgia.

Tennessee. Maryland.

Texas, North Carolina.

Western Division: South Carolina.

Arizona. Virginia

California. West Virginia.

Colorado. North Central Division:

Idaho. Illinois.

Montana. Indiana.

Nevada. Iowa.

New Mexico. Kansas.

Oregon. Michigan.

Utah. Minnesota.

Washington. Missouri.

Wyoming.

EXPLANATION OF SEPARATE TABLES.

Table 1.--Strikes for each State, by years and industries, 1901 to 1905 (pp. 120 to 423).- This table presents, by years, for each State the data for all strikes which occurred in each of the 82 industries under which all lines of work have been classified for this report. This table includes only the five years covered by the present investigation, 1901 to 1905. In addition to showing the data for each industry within each year and State, the table also shows a total of all industries for each year from 1901 to 1905 for each State, and a total for each State for the entire five-year period.

Table 11.--Summary of strikes for the United States, by industries and years, 1901 to 1905 (pp. 424 to 471).- This table summarizes the facts presented in Table I. Under each of the 82 industries are presented the data concerning all strikes which occurred in the United States in each of the years from 1901 to 1905.

Table III.-Summary of strikes for the United States, by industries, 1881 to 1905 (pp. 472 to 477).- This table combines and summarizes, by industries, the facts presented in the Third, Tenth, and Sixto make a presentation for all strikes that occurred in the United States during the twenty-five years from 1881 to 1905. Certain facts presented in Tables I and II for the years 1901 to 1905 were not obtained for the whole twenty-five years, and therefore must be omitted from Tables III, IV, and V, covering the period from 1881 to 1905. These items are the number of strikes settled by joint agreement and by arbitration, the sex of strikers, and the number of male, female, and total employees in the establishments after the strike.

Table 1V.-Summary of strikes for the United States, by years, 1881 to 1905 (pp. 478 and 479).---This table summarizes, by years, the data for all strikes in the United States from 1881 to 1905. The facts presented in the Third, Tenth, and Sixteenth Annual Reports have been combined with the facts gathered in this investigation.

Table V.-Summary of strikes for the United States, by States and geographical divisions, 1881 to 1905 (pp. 480 to 485).- This table summarizes, first by States and then by geographical divisions, the data for all strikes which occurred in the United States from 1881 to 1905. The facts presented in the Third, Tenth, and Sixteenth Annual Reports have been combined with those collected during the present investigation.

Table 1'1.-Summary of strikes for the United States, ordered by labor organizations and not so ordered, by industries, 1881 to 1905 (pp. 486 to 489).—In this table and in the two tables which follow all strikes which occurred in the United States during the twenty-five years from 1881 to 1905 have been divided into two classes---those ordered by labor organizations and those not ordered by labor organizations. Under each of these two classes are shown the number of strikes; the number of establishments in which the strike succeeded, succeeded partly, and failed, and the total number of establishments; the number of strikers; and the number of employees thrown out of work in the establishments involved in strike. This table presents figures for each of the two classes of strikes under each of the 82 industries.

Table V'll.-Summary of strikes for the United States, ordered by labor organizations and not so ordered, by years, 1881 to 1905 (pp. 490 and 491).- The table summarizes, by years, the same data enumerated in the explanation of the preceding table. It shows for each year from 1881 to 1905 the statistics for strikes in the United States ordered by labor organizations and for strikes not so ordered.

Table VIII.-Summary of strikes for the United States, ordered by labor organizations and not so ordered, by States and geographical dirisions, 1881 to 1905 (pp. 492 to 495).— This table summarizes, first by States and then by geographical divisions, the data named in the explanation of Table VI for all strikes in the United States ordered by labor organizations and for all not so ordered during the twentyTable 1X.--Strikes for each State, by years and causes, 1901 to 1905 (Pp:496 to 579).—This table presents, by years for each State, data for the strikes which were undertaken for each of the specified causes. This table includes only the years 1901 to 1905, the years covered by the present investigation. An explanation of the several causes named in this report is given on pages 113 and 114. This table and the other tables relating to causes show under each cause only the number of strikes; the number of establishments in which the strike succeeded, succeeded partly, and failed, and total number of establishments; the number of strikers; and the number of employees thrown out of work in the establishments involved in strike.

Table X.-Summary of strikes for the United States, by years and causes, 1881 to 1905 (pp. 580 to 613).— This table summarizes, by causes for which undertaken, all strikes which occurred in the United States during each year from 1881 to 1905. The facts presented in the several reports on strikes have been combined for the twenty-five years. This table shows only such facts as are enumerated in Table IX.

Table XI.--Summary of strikes for the United States, by causis, 1881 to 1905 (pp. 614 to 621).---This table summarizes, by causes for which undertaken, all strikes which occurred in the United States during the whole twenty-five-year period from 1881 to 1905. The facts presented in the several reports on strikes have been combined for the twenty-five-year period. This table shows only these facts enumerated in Table IX.

Table X11.-Results of strikes for each cause, by years, 1881 to 1905 (pp. 6.22 to 63,5).—This table shows, by years, the results of strikes due to each of the 14 causes enumerated on page 112, and also the results of strikes in which each of the 14 causes was a partial or contributing cause. A strike due to several causes (each of which was a partial or contributing cause) has been entered under each of the causes involved. The table shows for each year under each of the causes the number of establishments involved in strikes due to that cause, and also the number and per cent of establishments in which the strike was wholly successful, partly successful, and failed.

Tables XIII to XX relate to lockouts, and are similar in form and method of presentation to certain tables, relating to strikes, which have already been described.

Table X111.-Lockouts for each State, by years and industries, 1.901 to 1905 (pp. 636 to 707).- This table is similar to Table I, relating to strikes.

Table XIV.-Summary of lockouts for the United States, by industries and years, 1901 to 1905 (pp. 708 to 731).— This table is similar to Table XV.-Summary of lockouts for the United States, by industries, 1881 to 1905 (pp. 732 to 735).—This table is similar to Table III, relating to strikes, except that in this table no data are shown indicating the number of lockouts ordered by employers' organizations and not so ordered.

Table XVI.--Summary of lockouts for the United States, by years, 1881 to 1905 (pp. 736 and 737).-This table is similar to Table IV, relating to strikes, except that the number of lockouts ordered by employers' organizations and the number not so ordered are not shown.

Table XVII.-Summary of lockouts for the United States, by States and geographical divisions, 1881 to 1905 (pp. 738 to 741).—This table is similar to Table V, relating to strikes, except that no data are shown indicating the number of lockouts ordered by employers' organizations and not so ordered.

Table XVIII.-Lockouts for each State, by years and causes, 1901 to 1905 (pp. 742 to 762).—This table is similar to Table IX. relating to strikes.

Table XIX.-Summary of lockouts for the United States, by years and causes, 1881 to 1905 (pp. 763 to 771).-This table is similar to Table X, relating to strikes.

Table xx.-Summary of lockouts for the United States, by causes, 1881 to 1905 (pp. 772 and 773).- This table is similar to Table XI, relating to strikes.

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