Sketches of Old Dublin

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Sealy, Bryers and Walker, 1907 - 331 pages

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Page 139 - I am one of the governors of all the hackney coaches, carts, and carriages, round this town, who dare not insult me like your rascally waggoners or coachmen, but give me the way ; nor is there one lord or squire for a hundred of yours, to turn me out of the road, or run over me with their coaches and six...
Page 294 - The house of lords far exceeds that at Westminster ; and the lord lieutenant's throne as far exceeds that miserable throne (so called) of the king in the English house of lords. The house of commons is a noble room indeed. It is an octagon, wainscoted round with Irish oak, which shames all mahogany, and galleried all round for the convenience of the ladies.
Page 294 - With that dignity which never failed to signalize his official actions, he held up the Bill for a moment in silence ; he looked steadily around him on the last agony of the expiring Parliament. He at length repeated, in an emphatic tone, " as many as are of opinion that THIS BILL do pass, say aye.
Page 294 - The galleries were full, but the change was lamentable ; they were no longer crowded with those who had been accustomed to witness the eloquence and to animate the debates of that devoted assembly. A monotonous and melancholy murmur ran through the benches — scarcely a word was exchanged...
Page 213 - During the busy days of the surveys in Ireland, "his way was to retire early to his lodgings where his supper was only a handful of raisins and a piece of bread. He would bid one of his clerks, who wrote a fair hand, go to sleep, and while he eat his raisins and walked about he would dictate to the other, who was a ready man at shorthand.
Page 294 - The affirmative was languid but indisputable, another momentary pause ensued, again his lips seemed to decline their office: at length, with an eye averted from the object which he hated, he proclaimed with a subdued voice, 'the AYES have it.
Page 35 - That every member of this Society, at his admission, be desired to choose some particular subject, either in Natural History, or in Husbandry, Agriculture, or Gardening, or some species of Manufacture, or other branch of improvement, and make it his business, by reading what had been printed on that subject, by conversing with them who made it their profession, or by making his own experiments, to make himself master thereof, and to report in writing, the best account they can get by experiment or...
Page 294 - With that dignity which never failed to signalise his official actions, he held up the bill for a moment in silence ; he looked steadily around him. on the last agony of the expiring Parliament. He at length repeated, in an emphatic tone, " As many as are of opinion that this bill do pass, say aye.
Page 20 - Anne we learn that this munificent prelate x ' did out of his generous inclinations to the public good of this kingdom, the propagation of the true Christian religion as by law established, and...
Page 275 - ... the Badge of Our said Order; and the said Badge shall be of Gold surmounted with a Wreath of Shamrock, or Trefoil, within which shall be a Circle of Blue Enamel, containing the Motto of Our said Order in Letters of Gold, viz. ., QUIS SEPARABIT...

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