Congregationalists in America: A Popular History of Their Origin, Belief, Polity, Growth and Work. Special Chapters by Joseph E. Roy [and Others] Introductions by Richard S. Storrs and Oliver O. Howard

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J. A. Hill, 1894 - 552 pages

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Page 519 - I have commanded you, and lo ! I am with you alway, even to the end of the world.
Page 83 - And there at the river, by Ahava, I proclaimed a fast that we might humble ourselves before our God, and seek of him a right way for us, and for our children, and for all our substance.
Page 124 - Democracy I do not conceive that ever God did ordain as a fit government either for church or commonwealth. If the people be governors, who shall be governed?
Page 272 - These fanatics brought to civil and military affairs a coolness of judgment, and an immutability of purpose, which some writers have thought inconsistent with their religious zeal, but which were in fact the necessary effects of it. The intensity of their feelings on one subject made them tranquil on every other.
Page 88 - Covenant and Combine ourselves together into a Civil Body Politic, for our better ordering and preservation and furtherance of the ends aforesaid; and by virtue hereof to enact, constitute and frame such just and equal Laws, Ordinances, Acts, Constitutions and Offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meet and convenient for the general good of the Colony, unto which we promise all due submission and obedience.
Page 126 - What ||we ought to do,|| if a general governour should be sent out of England? 2. Whether it be lawful for us to carry the cross in our banners ? — In the first case, they all agreed, that, if a general governour were sent, we ought not to accept him, but defend our lawful possessions, (if we were able ;) otherwise to avoid or protract.
Page 529 - We believe in one God, the Father Almighty, Maker of heaven and earth, and of all things visible and invisible.
Page 88 - ... covenant and combine ourselves together into a civil body politic, for our better ordering and preservation and furtherance of the ends aforesaid; and by virtue hereof to enact, constitute and frame such just and equal laws, ordinances, acts, constitutions and offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meet and convenient for the general good of the Colony unto which we promise all due submission and obedience.
Page 91 - Upon the hill, they have a large square house, with a flat roof, made of thick sawn planks, stayed with oak beams, upon the top of which they have six cannons, which shoot iron balls of four and five pounds, and command the surrounding country. The lower part they use for their church, where they preach on Sundays and the usual holidays.
Page 122 - These all died in faith, not having received the promises, but having seen them and greeted them from afar, and having confessed that they were strangers and pilgrims on the earth.

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