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COMMISSIONERS, JUSTICES OF THE PEACE, NOTARIES
PUBLIC, STIPENDIARY AND POLICE MAGISTRATES, CLERKS OF

COURTS, REGISTRARS AND OTHER OFFICIALS,

WITH

APPENDIX CONTAINING TREATY, ETC., ALSO, NATURALIZATION

LAWS OF UNITED STATES, WITH FORMS, ETC.

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TORONTO AND EDINBURGH :
CARSWELL & CO., LAW BOOK PUBLISHERS,

1884.

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Entered according to Act of Parliament of the Dominion of Canada, in the year of our

Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty-four, by Alfred Howell, in the office of the Minister of Agriculture.

PRINTED AT THE OFFICE OF MOORE & Co., 20 ADELAIDE ST. EAST,

TORONTO,

There is no right or function which we exercise as free citizens in which we do not desire you to participate, and with this civil freedom we equally gladly offer you absolute religious liberty. The forms of worship which you have brought with you, you will be able to practice in the most unrestricted manner, and we confidently trust that those blessings which have waited upon your virtuous exertions in your Russian homes will continue to attend you here; for we hear that you are a sober-minded and God-fearing community, and as such you are doubly welcome amongst us. In the name then of Canada and her people, in the name of Queen Victoria and her Empire, I again stretch out to you the hand of brotherhood and good fellowship, for you are as welcome to our affection as you are to our lands, our liberties and our freedom. Beneath the flag whose folds now wave above us, you will find protection, peace, civil and religious liberty, constitutional freedom and equal laws."-Speech of His Excellency Earl Dufferin to Immigrants of Foreign Nationality settled in Manitoba, August, 1877.

"There is no reason ultimately to doubt that the population attracted to you (the people of British Columbia) as soon as you have a line through the mountains, will be the population which we most desire to have—a people like that of the old Imperial Islands—drawn from the strongest races of Northern Europe, one that with English, American, Irish, German, French and Scandinavian blood shall be a worthy son of the old mother of nations." -Speech of His Excellency the Marquis of Lorne, at Victoria, B. C., 1882.

PREFACE.

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The decennial census, 1881, showed the population of foreign nationalities resident in the Dominion of Canada to be 124,369, which has since been increased by many thousands, and new accessions are constantly arriving. They come from the United States, from Norway and Sweden, Denmark, Holland, Germany, France, Russia, Italy, China, and other parts of the world; and, unlike those who come from the British Islands, and other British possessions, who are our fellow-subjects, they are the subjects or citizens of foreign powers, and not entitled to the privileges of British subjects in this country unless they become such by naturalization. Upon becoming settled, especially those with families, they learn the advantages of being placed upon the same footing as native-born subjects, and large numbers in various parts of the Dominion annually become naturalized. And it is more than probable that under the new law, which admits of denaturalization, larger numbers will seek naturalization than previously, as the scruples which some have had against abjuring their country or sovereign have been met by provisions of the new law. This law embodies the principle that it should be free to every one to expatriate and denationalize himself, and to transfer his allegiance to another country.(p. 56.)

To persons contemplating naturalization or desirous of obtaining the benefit of other provisions of the Act, as well as to those who, in the discharge of professional or official duties, may be called upon to advise or aid them in the formalities of the law, it was thought a book containing

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