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they have set. I should now proceed to SERM.

XIX. point out those duties of the dying person, which have for their object God and the salvation of his own soul ; but this I must reserve for a future opportunity.

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SERMON XX.

ON THE DUTIES OF THE SICK.

SECOND PART.

Isaiah XXXVIII. LATTER PART OF V. 1.

Set thine house in order, for thou shalt die,

and not live,

In a late discourse on this text, I proposed SERM.

XX. to point out the principal duties incumbent on us in the hour of sickness. These, I observed, were of two kinds, temporal and spiritual ; the first relating to our fellowcreatures, the latter to God and our own

souls.

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SERM. souls. The duties which relate to
XX.

fellow-creatures I have already laid before
you; to those due from us to God, and
which have for their object the salvation
of our souls, I shall beg your attention at
present.

The first of these which I shall mention is patience. This virtue is the more necessary for us to practise, inasmuch as without it we shall be totally unable to practise any other. Turbulence or despondency under our pains and danger will equally unfit us either for performing, or even perceiving, what we ought to do. To be resigned to our affictions, be they of what kind they may, is likewise the express command of God, and that in such a multitude of places in the scripture, that it is not necessary to mention them : in conformity with this command, all the most eminent personages whose history is recorded in the sacred writings were remarkably distinguished by their patient sub- SEP M.

mark

XX. mission to the evils which befel them. You remember the numberless, heavy calamities which were experienced by Job; what were his sentiments under them ?—“ The “ Lord hath given, and the Lord hath taken “ away ; blessed be the name.of the Lord!” And when to the other evils, with which he was oppressed, the most loathsome and painful disease was added, how nobly does he support himself under it! The recollection of the past blessings, which he had enjoyed, engaged his gratitude more than his present sufferings excited his affliction. “ Shall we receive good (exclaimed he) at

the hands of God, and shall we not re“ ceive evil ?” You have not forgot the resigned answer of Eli to the prophetic threatnings of Samuel :-" It is the Lord, “ let him do what seemeth him good.” Indeed this consideration that our suffering is from God, as it should reconcile us

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