Annual Meeting of the American Institute of Instruction, Volume 32

Front Cover
American Institute of Instruction, 1862
List of members included in each volume, beginning with 1891.

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Page 45 - I shall detain you no longer in the demonstration of what we should not do, but straight conduct you to a hill-side, where I will point you out the right path of a virtuous and noble education; laborious indeed at the first ascent, but else so smooth, so green, so full of goodly prospect and melodious sounds on every side, that the harp of Orpheus was not more charming.
Page 111 - By faith Moses, when he was come to years, refused to be called the son of Pharaoh's daughter ; choosing rather to suffer affliction with the people of GOD, than to enjoy the pleasures of sin for a season...
Page 96 - He fixed his eye upon a sage raised above the rest, who discoursed with great energy on the government of the passions. His look was venerable, his action graceful, his pronunciation clear, and his diction elegant.
Page 82 - Yet I doubt not through the ages one increasing purpose runs, And the thoughts of men are widened with the process of the suns.
Page 122 - Mothers are, indeed, the affectionate and effective teachers of the human race. The mother begins her process of training with the infant in her arms. It is she who directs, so to speak, its first mental and spiritual pulsations. She conducts it along the impressible years of childhood and youth, and hopes to deliver it to the...
Page 7 - Seest thou a man diligent in his business? he shall stand before kings ; he shall not stand before mean men...
Page 120 - Content thee, boy ! in my bower to dwell — Here are sweet sounds which thou lovest well ; Flutes on the air in the stilly noon, Harps which the wandering breezes tune, And the silvery wood-note of many a bird Whose voice was ne'er in thy mountains heard.
Page 120 - Fair child, thy brothers are wanderers now, They sport no more on the mountain's brow, They have left the fern by the spring's green side, And the streams where the fairy barks were tried. Be thou at peace in thy brighter lot, For thy cabin-home is a lonely spot.

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