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“THREE BEAUTIFUL SPECIMENs witH THose RIDIct'Lous TAILS ’’

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EVER in the history of New N England, if in this country, have military manoeuvres been held of the magnitude of those which took place from August 14th to 21st, 1909, in Southern Massachusetts. Never before has so much time and money be en expended by the government of the various states whose troops participated. Never have the citizens of any district shown more interest in military affairs, and never in history have plans been kept so secret from citizens and soldiers alike. It is the first time in the history of military manoeuvres in this country that transports were used and no permanent camps were made. The manoeuvres were considered of sufficient importance for foreign nations to send military attaches, and the interest the entire country manifested was shown by the fact that over 250 newspaper representatives accompanied the troops, the majority com

THE NEw ENGLAND MAGAZINE CORRESPONDENT AT THE FRONT

ing from states other than MassachuSetts. For weeks before the manoeuvres commenced the papers contained columns of contradictory information, the only official information given to the press was the date. Even the officers of the various outfits did not know where they were to be sent until some forty-eight hours before their departure. They were told that they were to defend Boston War was supposed to have broken out between the United States and a foreign power. The Navy was supposed to have been either defeated or destroyed, or else lured away from the neighborhood of MassachuSetts. The War Department, at Washington had received information that a fleet of transports, escorted by a naval force, was approaching New England, bringing Io,000 troops with the idea of seizing the forts of Boston from the land and that the objective point for the transports was somewhere from Ruzzards lay to Salisbury Beach, The object of the manoeuvres was to show just how hard or easy it would be for invaders to land from transports and push forward inland for the captute of Roston as a basis of supplies, and to determine, it possible, whether it was imperative that more coast battetics and men be added to the Massacosetts coast. The defence of Roston was given over to the Massachusetts Militia, with to General officers of the National USvard in command, while the invadcos were commanded by resular army wo-cos, The rarecovres were in charse of Corcoal locoratod Wood and General

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The tuxton,v ARRival, or Col. TALBor AND THE CADETs

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Troops A, B and D, M.V.M., a battalion of Field Artillery composed of Batteries A, B and C, and the Signal and Ambulance Corps consisting of one Company each. The invading forces consisted of the District of Columbia, 1st Field Battery, 1st and 2nd Regiments Infantry, 1st separate Battalion of Infantry (Colored), Ambulance and Signal Corps, Connecticut 1st and 2nd Regiment Infantry, Troop A, Battery A and a Signal Corps. The New York 7th and 14th Regiments Infantry, 22nd Regiment of Engineers, Squadron A, 1st and 2nd Company Signal Corps, 1st, 2nd and 3rd Battery of Field Artillery, the New Jersey Squadron of Cavalry and the ioth U. S. Cavalry \Colored). The latter famous for their work at San Joan and in the Philippines, Refore the manoeuvres much criticism was expressed by the general pobs at the war department for order:ns he ro:::a on so stren:cos a too::. *\\ }•y.” said they, “it is absord to expes: citizen soldiers to so from the costs and workshops ::::s the fieli and roosh it with the resolars." Ro:

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citizen soldier; he was pleased and keen about going, and as the time drew near became impatient to start. So enthusiastic were most that they gave up Saturdays and Sundays for weeks before the appointed date, and companies of infantry could be seen on practice marches all over the state. The men themselves trained and did what they could to get in the best physical condition, for they knew the manoeuvres were to be “no boys' play,” but would involve miles of marching over fields, through meadows, swamps and forests with sandy soil to make it harder. The manoeuvres held this summer would have been impossible a few years ago. But the second line of defence, as the regulars now term the

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but a week's vacation. To-day it is work, work, work and then more work.

In the olden days enlisted men took along trunks filled with fancy uniforms, cot beds, a case or two of beer and, possibly, a man to do the dirty work. In those days there were tents to sleep in and the meals were served in a mess hall, dress parades were held and their lady friends attended. How different it is to-day and how much more interesting and instructive. An enlisted man takes one uniform, usually made of khaki, which he wears. He camps where he happens to be at niglit, sleeps in his clothes on the ground with nothing but a rubber blanket between himself and “Mother Earth.” He may be covered by a Pup tent, but more often by the sky. Everything he takes is carried on his back. Instead of dress parades and drills, with galleries of admiring women, he has

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salt, .oz oz. of black pepper, or, possi bly, only gets an emergency ration. The Dick Bill has revolutionized th militia of this country. Before it wen into effect a large percentage of th enlisted men would have been unabl to participate in so strenuous a cam paign as the one held this summer i for no other reason than their physica condition. The physical examinations to-day ar strict, come at frequent intervals an are carried out to the letter. Unde the new law the militia, or more cor rectly, the National Guard, is a part o the U. S. army. The uniforms ar identical with the exception of th collar device. The equipment is th same. The government appropriate more money and expects more of th state. The President now has th power to order any military organiza tion out and send it wherever it i needed. The manoeuvres were not, as man. wrongly supposed, for the sole pur pose of hardening the militia man t campaign work. The principal object as already stated, was to test the de fence of the Massachusetts coast, but secondly, they were to accustom th

o: THE Ioth U. S. CAvALRY AT HALIFAx

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