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to the bar of justice, or that he was condemned by a great and free people. Since, however, writing this we perceive that we ought to have saved ourselves the trouble, for in the next page we find Mr. Jesse saying,—“ The iniquitous proceedings, under the false pretence of being guided by law and justice, by which Strafford was brought to the block, are too well known to require refutation. He was already a pre-judged and precondemned man,” &c. Which is Mr. Jesse's opinion ?

P. 421. Of “Thomas Parr, who did penance at the age of one hundred and thirty years for being the father of an illegitimate child,” &c. We think, though we speak cautiously, as we are at a distance from our own and all books, that there is a mistake here of some twenty or thirty years, if Mr. Jesse alludes to what Old Parr said in his interview with Charles the First, and which so disgusted the King with him as to order him out of his presence.

P. 422. “ Milton, in the churchyard of Saint Giles's Cripplegate, where his body was discovered a few years since, and one of his fingers converted into a tobacco-stopper.” This is altogether incorrect. Milton's body was never discovered, nor is it now at all known in what part of the church he was buried. Many (not a few) years ago a Mr. Neve, or Le Neve, * published a small pamphlet about the discovery of a coffin which he said was Milton's ; but George Steevens, and others who examined into the story, soon found its utter want of any foundation, and it has long since been forgotten. The pamphlet is now in our possession, and a wretched, foolish thing it is.

P. 422. “Gray lies in the churchyard of Stoke Pogeis, and Mason I know not where." Mason is buried in the churchyard of Aston, where he lived.

P. 437. “ The Nonconformist, Isaac Watts, the author of the wellknown Hymns,” &c. This little monument should not be passed uunoticed, for it is by Mr. Banks, the best and most classical sculptor this country ever could boast of previous to Flaxman, whom also in execution he far exceeded. We shall think this notice of him not in vain if it will lead any of our readers, who are admirers of the beautiful art which this neglected man of genius so successfully practised, to look further to his works; to the statue, for instance, of Achilles in the British Institution, Pall Mall, to the bas-reliefs in the National Gallery, and, above all, to the beautiful monuments of the Petrie family at Lewisham. The Abbey has several of the productions of his chisel.

Vol. II. p. 14. Mr. Jesse, in noticing the house of Sir Isaac Newton, in St. Martin's Street, should not have forgotten to say that there also subsequently resided the authoress of Cecilia, Miss Burney, with her father, and there her first novel was written.

P. 37. “ Who has not been interested in the history of John Taylor the Water Poet ?" &c. We are not at all interested in his history, but we may remark that to make a complete collection of his works seems a task that would baffle the utmost diligence, for the folio volume includes only a portion (to 1600), and all the Poems subsequently printed are to be sought for separately, and consisting, as many do, of a few leaves, are most difficult to find.

P. 40. Speaking of Pope, Mr. Jesse says, -—" It was to Will's that Pope,

* We apologise for our want of exactness, but we write this article from memory alone, being far away from our books.-Rev.

rary and Historical Memorials of London. [Jan. r that he was condemned by a great and free people. &

this we perceive that we ought to have saved ourin the next page we find Mr. Jesse saying,—“ The s, under the false pretence of being guided by law

Strafford was brought the block, are too well utation. He was already a pre-judged and pre

Which is Mr. Jesse's opinion ? s Parr, who did penance at the age of one hundred being the father of an illegitimate child,” &c. We

cautiously, as we are at a distance from our own -e is a mistake here of some twenty or thirty years,

what Old Parr said in his interview with Charles disgusted the King with him as to order him out of

in the churchyard of Saint Giles's Cripplegate, covered a few years since, and one of his fingers -stopper.” This is altogether incorrect. Milton's ed, nor is it now at all known in what part of the Many (not a few) years ago a Mr. Neve, or Le

pamphlet about the discovery of a coffin which he George Steevens, and others who examined into s utter want of any foundation, and it has long The pamphlet is now in our possession, and a is.

the churchyard of Stoke Pogeis, and Mason I 2 is buried in the churchyard of Aston, where he

1848.] Jesse's Literary and Historical Memorials of London. then a mere child, induced his friends to carry him, in order to feas eyes with the sight of the great poet in whose path of fame and geniu was destined hereafter so worthily to follow. Tantum Virgilium ve We think Pope said something very different from this if he meant to that he had only seen Dryden. Perhaps he said “ Virgilium tantùm v It would be difficult to know what the other expression meant.

P. 48. We find this note". Those who may wish to be better infor as to the nature of the outrage will find the particulars in the Biogra Britannica, vol. vi. p. 3604 ; the Athena Oxonienses, vol. ii. col. 11 and Anthony Wood's Life of Himself, p. 187.". On referring to the where the guiding asterisk, is we read~" Don't be uneasy; I can se likes you very well ;" but we confess we do not see the connection of two-the text and the note.

P. 51. Speaking of the well-known story of Sir Charles Sedley Mr. J says,—“It is much too indecent for repetition.” To that we agree, a as it has been told; but it is much the same as the very story tha recorded previously of Lord Bolingbroke, from the information of G smith.

P. 55. The witty retorts of Dr. Radcliffe to Madame D'Orsley, Jesse says, “are familiar alone to those who delight in old books, which formed the subject of a Latin poem in the Anthologia.Now delight as much in old books as we dislike new ones, but we confess we not know where to go to find the one called by so common a nam Anthologia, though we have no doubt, on Mr. Jesse's authority, tha exists. We presume he does not mean the “ Musæ Anglicanæ," or selection from it in one volume; and so confessing our ignorance we in his next edition he would specify the date and title more fully.”

P. 63. The Cyder Cellar was one of Professor Porson's favou resorts, but we never heard before that it was also frequented by Reverend Dr. Parr, which his profession surely forbade, and his ne residing in London seemed to preclude. A few weeks, we believe, have elapsed since two clergymen have been suspended by their bishop Inerely supping at a similar house of entertainment. Dr. Parr, amid all oddities never failed to preserve the purity of his sacerdotal charac and the respectability of his sacred profession.

P. 147. “ From the strong sense of Earl St. Vincent to the sparkl wit of Charles Fox.” This is not appropriate. Charles Fox was no all a man of wit, and never attempted it. His talents were of a differ kind; but his father, Lord Holland, had as much wit, and of as genu a kind, as any man of his time, and his bon-mots and repartees still alive. We could repeat twenty.

P. 310. The story of Clarence and the butt of malmsey we believe be’a very apocryphal one indeed, and not worthy of historical notice came from “ Holinshed, and Hall, and Stowe.”

P. 345. “ The question of the guilt or innocence of Anne Boleyn are not called upon to discuss." There are no means of discussing it, materials being wanting, and the evidence on the trial being all destroy But one thing has not been sufficiently noticed on this subject

, that destruction of Anne Boleyn by any means was the great object of Roman Catholics, who with unrelenting hatred, as with impenetra secrecy, pursued their fated prey, and in their intrigues will be found mainspring of the plot against her—in that power seated on the Ron GENT. MAG. VOL. XXIX.

D

formist, Isaac Watts, the author of the wells little monument should not be passed uunonks, the best and most classical sculptor this previous to Flaxman, whom also in execution think this notice of him not in vain if it will ho are admirers of the beautiful art which $ so successfully practised, to look further to r instance, of Achilles in the British Insti--reliefs in the National Gallery, and, above nts of the Petrie family at Lewisham. The luctions of his chisel. n noticing the house of Sir Isaac Newton, in e have forgotten to say that there also subsef Cecilia, Miss Burney, with her father, and n. interested in the history of John Taylor the

t at all interested in his history, but we may e collection of his works seems a task that ce, for the folio volume includes only a ms subsequently printed are to be sought for - do, of a few leaves, are most difficult to find. Jesse says,—“It was to Will's that Pope,

-ctness, but we write this article from memory

REV.

throne, which has a thousand eyes and a thousand arms, and can walk the earth invisibly, working its will at any moment and at any place ;* the eyes of this serpent were ever fixed upon that poor helpless victim, never to be taken off till her ruin was sealed. Even at this day, in Italy and Spain, we are told that her name is held in execration, and she is represented in the tortures of the infernal regions. Thus

The love that taught a monarch to be wise was a love fatal to her, and

The gospel light that dawned from Boleyn's eyes was a light that soon burst into a destructive fire to consume her. We think there is something in Brydone's Travels on this subject.

P. 352. On the same subject we come to paragraph which has puzzled us exceedingly, and which we must leave to others to explain.—“ Yet the Queen ( Anne Boleyn) said this day at dinner, that she should go to Hanover."

P. 363. “ The gay, the gallant, and the handsome Earl of Surrey." Gay and gallant, but we do not recollect where he is called handsome. Certainly not in the celebrated picture seen at Hampton Court.

P. 365. “Sir Richard Epsom and Edward Dudley.” Empson, of course, the well known minister of Henry the Seventh's extortions as a Baron of the Exchequer.

!

We will now add a few notes written by Horace WALPOLE and by GRAY the poet, which we transcribe from copies we possess of Dodsley's London, bearing the manuscript notes of these learned, distinguished, and careful writers, and which we think will be acceptable to our readers. Mr. Gray's notes extend throughout the whole work, exhibiting a richness of information, and a judgment and accuracy of the highest value, and which he brought to every subject that came under his investigation, forming a strong contrast to the careless and superficial negligence of the present day.

“ Covent Garden."-Walpole mentions that at Abbs Court, in the parish of Walton-upon-Thames, in Surrey, was a great farm and kitchen garden, made by the last Earl of Halifax, who intended to supply the market of Covent Garden ; but the scheme did not answer.

“ Blackfriars."-"In the reign of Queen Elizabeth Blackfriars was inhabited by many noblemen and gentlemen,” &c. “ It was the King's wardrobe, and his artists lived there, particularly his painters."—W,

“ Montagu House, in Great Russell Street, Bloomsbury. A large and magnificent building, finely ornamented with paintings," Chiefly by Baptist."-W.

“ Camden House, in Middlesex, a little to the west of Kensington Palace, was lately the seat and manor of the Earl of Warwick, but it now belongs to Henry Fox, esq.”—“This is all a blunder. Campden House, built by the Lords Viscounts Campden, is now a school. Holland House, beyond that, came from the Earls of Holland to those of Warwick, to whose heir, Mr. Edwardes, it belongs, and is let upon a long lease to Mr. Fox.”—W.

“ Chelsea."- '_“ Sir Thomas More lived here. The Lord Admiral Nottingham, the Duke of Beanfort, the Marquess of Lindsey, the last Duchess of Ormond, and Sir Hans Sloane, who was lord of the manor," &c. So did Anne of Cleves and the Duchess of Mazarin.

See Hawkstone, a novel, vol. i. p. 204.-Rev.

“Chiswick-red velvet room—Madonna della Rosa, by Domenichino." -“ This picture was in a little church in Dioclesian's baths at Rome. Lord Burlington gave for it to the convent a complete set of marble columns for their church."-W.

“ Cleveland Court, Cleveland Row, formerly a large house called Berkshire House, which, being purchased by the Duchess of Cleveland, took her name." -"Lord Berkshire's gardens are mentioned in the Strafford Papers, vol. ii. p. 166."-W.

Copt Hall, the seat of John Conyers."-" There was a large old seat of the Earls of Dorset, which Mr. Conyers has lately pulled down, and rebuilt a new house on the plan of Lord Walpole's at Wolterton. In old Copt Hall was a fine painted glass window, with the effigies of Henry the Seventh and his Queen, which has been bought for and placed in St. Margaret's Church, Westminster.”_W. “ Formerly of New Hall, Essex."—W.

“Devonshire House.”——“ Designed by Kent. The portrait of an abbess over the door, by Vandyck, is Isabella Clara Eugenia, daughter of Philip the Second, and Governess of the Netherlands." —W.

“Dorset Gardens, Salisbury Court."-Here was formerly the playhouse."—W.

Mr. Jesse mentions a portrait of Jane Shore at Eton ; Walpole notices how it came there : “ In the provost's lodgings is a picture of Jane Shore, whose confessor was provost."

" Spencer House, Green Park.”—“Designed by Colonel George Grey."—W.

“Hammersmith.”—“ Catharine of Braganza, Queen Dowager, and Prince Rupert, had houses here."—W.

“Hampton Court."--" The Queen's drawing-room has the ceiling painted by Verrio.”—“So on the sides and over the chimney a whole length of Prince George, but so ill-done that Queen Caroline hung the room. -W.

“Hampton Court."The first and second courts are Gothic.”_" The new Gothic in the second court was built in the reign of King James the Second."-W.

“ Harrow-on-the-Hill."- :-_“On the summit stands the church, which has a very high spire.”—“Charles the Second said, it was the only visible church he knew."—W.

Marlborough House, Pall Mall.”—“ The house without the furniture cost 40,0001." —W.

“ Nonesuch, in Surrey."_“King Charles gave it to the Duchess of Cleveland, who pulled iť down and sold the materials, wherewith a new house was built by the Earl of Berkeley, which was the seat of the late Earl of Guilford, and is now called Durdans ; and Nonesuch, though it gives the title of Baron to the Duke of Cleveland, is now only a farmhouse.”—“It was given to Algernon Sidney during the Rebellion, great part being then destroyed ; the last remains were taken down by the second Duke of Grafton."-W.

“ Northumberland House.”_" It is reasonable to infer from some letters discovered in the front when it was lately rebuilt, that one Miles Glover was the architect.”_" This is a mistake; it was Gerard Crismass."—W.

“ Ditto."_" See an account of a meeting here on the death of King William, in Shippen’s Faction Displayed, in State Poems, vol. IV."—W.

“ Oatlands.”—“ Here was a palace of James and Charles the first. Henry Duke of Gloucester was born here. A garden gate, built by Inigo Jones, has been restored and renewed by the present Earl of Lincoln,

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with this inscription, Hanc portam ab Ignatio Jones olim constructam, vetustate collapsam, restituit Henricus Comes de Lincolne,” &c.—W.

“ Pall Mall.”—“ A very handsome street, inhabited by several persons of the first quality.”—“ Here is a large house built by the Duke of Schomberg, and another by Mr. Doddington, richly furnished, and another for the late Duke of York, designed by Chambers."—W.

“St. Paul's."--" In the area of the grand west front, on a pedestal of excellent workmanship, stands a statue of Queen Anne."- -“See Dr. South's verses on this statue.”—W.

“ Ditto.”—Frederick Prince of Wales intended, if he had lived to be King, to erect a monument there in the body of the church to his grandfather, George the First."—W.

“Queen's Library."-"A handsome building erected by that learned princess her late Majesty Queen Caroline."_" Designed by Kent."-W.

“ Palace at Richmond.”—“Lord Chomley destroyed all the remains of the old palace but gateway, and built a new house and gallery ; it was bought by Earl Brook, and he has exchanged it with Sir Richard Lyttleton for his villa at Ealing. It has since been sold to the Countess Dowager Cowper, &c."—W.

“ New Lodge in Richmond Park."- -“ It was designed by Henry Earl of Pembroke for King George the First, and finished by Princess Emily. The old lodge built by Sir Robert Walpole."—W.

“ Soho Square.” “ My Lord Bateman's on the south side is the most remarkable. It has the appearance of grandeur and magnificence," &c.“ It was the Duke of Monmouth’s. Lord Bateman's has since been pulled down, and a street * built."—W.

“ Somerset House.”—“The most beautiful front is that towards the garden, situated upon an elevation, part of which has been new built, with a fine piazza and lofty apartments over it.”—“ Designed by Inigo Jones, as was the chapel."—W.

« The Tower,”- '-" The axe with which Queen Anne Boleyn, the mother of Queen Elizabeth, was beheaded, on 19th May, 1536. The Earl of Essex, Queen Elizabeth's favourite, was also beheaded with the same axe!... Anne Boleyn was beheaded by a sword !"+-W.

1

We now give a few extracts from Gray's manuscripts on the “Environs of London."

“Westminster Abbey.”—“ This venerable fabric has been new coated on the outside, except that part called Henry the Seventh's Chapel.”“With Burford stone, by Sir Christopher Wren ; done about 1713, 11mo Annæ."--G.

“ The west end has been adorned with two new stately towers, that have been lately rebuilt in such a manner as to be thought equal in point of workmanship to any part of the ancient building,"_" After designs by Sir Christopher Wren, who also made drawings for a spire of twelve sides, which is to be built hereafter. Neither this master nor the great Inigo Jones, are at all to be admired in their imitations of the Gothic style. This front of the Abbey has no detached columns, or other pierced works of carving, to which the true Gothic principally owes its lightness, and there is besides a mixture of modern ornaments entirely inconsistent with this mode of building, such as the broken scroll-pediments supported by consoles, with masques and festoons over the round apertures, designed for

* Bateman's Buildings. t" “The sword of Calais.” Chronicle of Calais, p. 47.

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