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fore her, he could not keep his eyes pious will that he wept for gladness; from following that path which they and he fortified his heart as well as he had so often traversed. And, as he could, telling her, that, since he could looked piteously on Pauline, he was never have aught of her in this world seized with such a heat that he felt except her voice, he esteemed himself almost dead, and while he tried to most happy in that he lived in a place conceal it he fell down at her feet. where he could always see her again, The fear, however, which he had lest and where they should always be the the true cause should be known, made holier for the sight, living as they did him pretend that the pavement of the a life of love, with one heart and soul church had occasioned his fall, which, drawn and led by the goodness of God, in truth, did happen to be somewhat who, they prayed, would ever hold uneven in that spot.

them in that hand whence none can And when Pauline knew that the perish. And as he said this, and wept change of his dress had not changed for love and joy, he kissed her hands; his heart, and that it was now so long but she bent her face down to her since his entering the monastery that hand, and they gave each other a kiss everybody thought she had forgotten of holy love. And Pauline then dehim, she resolved to put into execution parted, and entered into the convent her long-cherished desire, that the end of Saint Claire, where she met with a of their friendship should be alike in kind welcome and took the veil. She habit, form, and manner of life, as they afterwards sent word about it to the had once lived in one house, under the marchioness, who was so astonished same master and mistress. And, as that she would not believe it; but she she had already four months before went the next day to the convent to arranged all that was necessary for see her, and to try to turn her from her her entering a convent, one morning purpose. But Pauline made answer she asked leave of the marchioness to to her, that though she had had power hear mass at Saint Claire, which she to deprive her of an earthly husband, granted immediately, as she knew not she must rest contented with that, and the object of the request; and as Pau- not seek to part her from Him who is line passed by the cordeliers she asked immortal and invisible, for, indeed, it the porter to call her old lover to her, was not in her power, nor in any creathough she mentioned him only as her ture's in the world. The marchioness, relation. And when she saw him in a beholding her resolution, then kissed chapel alone, she said, “If my honour her, and left her with great regret. had permitted me as soon as you, I

And Pauline and her lover lived so should have taken the veil long ago, devoutly and holily there, that we and not have waited till now; but ought not to doubt that He, the end having destroyed by my patience the of whose law is charity, said to them suspicions of those who would rather at the close of their lives as he said of judge ill than well, I am resolved now old to Magdalene, that their sins were to adopt the manner of life and dress forgiven them, for they had loved that you have done, without any fur- much, and that he received them into ther inquiry. And if it be well with that world where the reward passes you, I shall share it with you; and if the merits of man." it be ill with you, I would not be Thus closes this beautiful story, and exempt: for by what path you enter there are many that equal it in pathos. into Paradise, by that would I wish to Margaret has not a little of that follow ; since I am sure that Ile who strength in her style, which touches is alone the true, perfect, and worthy so forcibly when it melts into tenderlove, has drawn us to his service by She wrote in the “ Elizabethan our mutual and honourable love, which age” of French literature, and strength He will turn by his holy spirit entirely was the characteristic of the times. It to himself; and I pray that we may appears alike in Rabelais' grandest both forget the old body which perishes periods,* or Clement Marot's lightest and is born from Adam, to receive

* Many persons are not aware that in and be re-clothed with that of our

Rabelais' strange book can be found by heavenly bridegroom. Her lover was far the grandest passages of French prose. so glad and overjoyed to hear her Many of his serious sentences rival Bacon.

ness.

1

songs; but we look in vain for any The phrase “ world without end" is trace of it in the modern literature of sufficiently understood in the aggreFrance. It has vanished, like the Eli- gate by many who are unable to anazabethan sturdiness of expression in lyse it. World (woruld) is an Angloour own tongue; and the style that Šaxon plural denoting ages; originally once rose as the panting breath of ac- wereald, from wer, man, and eald, age; tion from the national soul has now the latter from yldan, to delay, linger, degenerated into luxurious_ ease and tarry; hence weoruld (singular and refinement,

plural alike), man's age, his time, and Like winds, whose loftiest pæan ends but in the modern acceptation, his place of in a sigh!

tarrying or sojourning—this world. Yours, &c. E. B. C. In sæcula sæculorum, or metrically,

In sæculorum sæcula, to ages of ages, MR. URBAN,

5th Nov. is in Anglo-Saxon, On worulda woTHE Liturgy of the Church of ruld, or, On á (ævorum) weoruld; so, England is an admirable composition. á butan ende, aye (ever, ages, or world) Several of its parts are translated from without end. forms used in the Latin Church from

2. In the heavenly anthem Te Deum an early age. It is to be regretted

we say or sing, that in one or two instances the sense “ Make them to be numbered with and spirit of the original have not been thy saints in glory everlasting:" preserved.

“ To be numbered in glory” is poor 1. In the general Doxology there is English ; and numerari gloria is no no authority for the expression “is

Latin. By no rule or practice of that now, and ever shall be,”,“ et nunc, et language can such a collocation be tosemper," being connected with gloria lerated. The holy bishops Ambrosius [sit), not with“ sicut erat," as the and Athanasius wrote and chanted : translation represents. The full mean- "Æterna fac cum sanctis tuis gloria ing is elicited by the following arrange- munerari.” ment:

Here we find a verb which is always Gloria, sicut erat in principio, [sit] and everywhere construed with an Patri, et Filio, et Spiritui Sancto, et ablative case, and signifies to gift, give nunc et semper, et in sæcula sæculo- freely, present, &c. In the decline of

the Roman language it may

have been Glory, as it was in the beginning, used in a passive sense, and so the be to the Father, and to the Son, and Anglo-Saxon gloss renders it,—“beon to the Holy Ghost, both now, and forgifen," make them to be preever, and world without end. Amen.

sented or gifted, &c.; but the Latin Or, Glory to the Father, &c. as it was would not be more remote from clasin the beginning, so be it both now, sical

usage if we should join, “ fac muand ever, &c.

nerari," do present; or render simply “Glory be as it is now, and thus : -“Bestow upon them with thy ever shall be," is like praying for a saints glory everlasting." thing, and at the same time affirming My reading of the Latin stands firm that very thing to be now and for

in all editions and MSS.; and, exever existing just as we pray that it cepting the English and its derivatives,

in the language of every church, peoThis view of the original meaning ple, or land, that has adopted this is confirmed by the metrical forms of

song of triumph. the Doxology.

Yours, &c. EBENR. THOMSON.
Patri, simulque Filio,

P.S. It is to the Anglo-Saxon gloss
Tibique, Sancte Spiritus,

that I owe this view of the passage.
Sicut fuit, sit jugiter
Sæculum per omne gloria.

Had I not seen that, I should not
Deo Patri sit gloria,

have turned my attention to the
Ejusque soli Filio,

subject.
Cum Spiritu Paraclsto,
Et nunc et in perpetuum.

rum. Amen.

may be.

1 for any

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The phrase " world without end” is erature of sufficiently understood in the aggree the Eli- gate by many who are unable to anaression in lyse it. World (woruld) is an Anglostyle that Saxon plural denoting ages ; originally ath of ac- wereald, from wer, man, and eald, age; has now

the latter from yldan, to delay, linger, ease and tarry: hence weoruld (singular and

plural alike), man's age, his time, and ends but in the modern acceptation, his place of

tarrying or sojourning—this world. C. B. C. In sæcula sæculorum, or metrically,

In sæculorum sæcula, to ages of ages, th Nov. is in Anglo-Saxon, On worulda wohurch of ruld, or, On á (ævorum) weoruld; so,

position. á butan ende, aye (ever, ages, or world) ated from without end. rch from

2. In the heavenly anthem Te Deum regretted we say or sing, — the sense

“ Make them to be numbered with not been thy saints in glory everlasting." .

* To be numbered in glory” is poor y there is English ; and numerari gloria ssion “is

Latin. By no rule or practice of that nunc, et language can such a collocation be to. th gloria lerated. The holy bishops Ambrosius

and Athanasius wrote and chanted: all mean

* Æterna fac cum sanctis tuis gloria arrange- munerari."

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no

" as the

Here we find a verb which is always pio, [sit] and everywhere construed with an ancto, et ablative case, and signifies to gift, give sæculo- freely, present, &c. In the decline of

the Roman language it may have been ginning, used in a passive sense, and so the son, and Anglo-Saxon gloss renders it, -—"beon W, and

forgifen," make them to be preAmen. sented or gifted, &c.; but the Latin s it was

would not be more remote from clash now, sical usage if we should join, “ fac mu

nerari," do present; or render simply "w, and thus : _“Bestow upon them with thy s for a saints glory everlasting." irming

My reading of the Latin stands firm nd for in all editions and MSS.; and, exthat it cepting the English and its derivatives

, in the language of every church, peoaning ple, or land, that has adopted this 'ms of

of triumph.

Yours, &c. EBENR. Tuomson. P.S. It is to the Anglo-Saxon gloss that I owe this view of the passage. Had I not seen that, I should not have turned my attention to the subject.

song

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