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officers of the Society for introducing this year the present commission scheme, which is working so admirably in my agency. October, last year, was, with one exception, the largest October we had ever had, and I received a telegram from my office to-night saying that the business to-day is over $140,000, $760,000 for the month, and a gain of $80,000 over the same month last year. I only mention this to show that besides having made already a gain of one million dollars over the very large business for the same period of last year, and besides getting a business of a higher character, it has rather increased than diminished, both in number of agents secured and amount of business written. This, in my opinion, is the most practical statement I can make as to the working of the new scheme, and the way in which it is regarded by me and my agency.”

“Much Too Stout"

The corpulent gentleman was severely lectured by a life insurance agent.

A rather stout gentleman recently applied for a life insurance policy, which was refused on the ground that he was not a “good risk.”

The trouble,” said the insurance man, “is that you are not careful about what you eat; you are much too stout.

R. J. MIX

"We like the Equitable. We like its Officers, its policyholders, its agency contract—and right here, gentlemen, I want to indorse every word that has been said by these Equitable managers to-night regarding the new system of compensating agents. I liked it the first time I saw it, and I do not believe that there is anything good to be had in the way of an agent or in the way of new business which cannot be secured under that splendid contract. The best assurance experience in the country has been calling for years for just such a proposition, and I say three cheers and a long life for the new contract."

The above is taken from the current number of What to Eat." Who did it? Go easy, boys! Don't lecture them too severely. Shows how the world moves, tho'. The prospect used to do all the kicking-now the agent does it all—and "severely lectures the corpulent gentleman." So mote it be!

JOHN C. EISELE.

“My partner and myself led the list, you will notice, for the month of September, and we propose to write and pay for personally this year more than a million dollars of paid business.

* I want to tell you to-night that so far as our agency is concerned, you will hear from us before the close of November; and, Brother Woods, I congratulate you and the Woods family and the little acorns that have now grown into spreading oaks, but you will have all you can do to look after your laurels if you expect to lead in November."

GOOD WORK. Mr. James B. Niver was in this office a few days ago, and showed us an application from a prominent Boston business man, and also a check for the first year's premium, $8,189.50. He had already placed two policies on this gentleman's life, one with a premium of $7,887.50, and the other with a premium of $1,376. Mr. Niver had also recently assured the applicant's brother for a policy with a premium of $7,194, so that these two brothers now pay in premiums every year $24,647. All these policies are Gold Debentures on the Endowment plan, and Mr. Niver says he hopes to assure each of these gentlemen for the Society's full limit before very long. May he be successful.

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The end of nineteen hundred sees the end of the first year of operation of the Society's new method of compensation. With the coming of nineteen hundred and one the agent will begin to realize the actual benefits accruing from it. And in nineteen hundred and two, and in the years after that, the benefits will increase still further, and with every year will come a still deeper, and still more thankful, recognition of the benefits of this method.

NEW DIRECTORS. At a meeting of the Board on Wednesday, October 31, W. H. Baldwin, Jr., and W. H. McIntyre were elected Directors of the Society. Mr. Baldwin is President of the Long Island Railroad Company, and is closely connected with the railroad interests of the East. Mr. McIntyre is the Assistant Secretary of the Society, and needs no introduction to our readers, as he has grown up with the Society, and has for over twenty-one years occupied a confidential position with it. He was for many years Private Secretary of the late Henry B. Hyde, and has worked his way up from the foot of the ladder to his present position by unswerving fidelity to his company, and tireless work in its behalf.

There is a tide in the affairs of men Which, taken at the food, leads on to fortune." This

was President Hyde's favorite motto in addressing agents. If there ever has been an appropriate time to quote such a motto it is at this moment, when a tide of prosperity is sweeping over the country. And do not forget the lines which follow:

"Omitted, all the voyage of their life

Is bound in shallows and in miseries." In taking advantage of the flood tide, keep well to the front. Then the momentum which you will gain, and the advance which you will make, will enable you to forge ahead even after the tide has turned And remember that if you are then well advanced, the ebb of the tide will be behind you. If, on the other hand, you fail to take advantage of the flood, you will not simply stand still, but the ebb will gain such momentum in its backward rush that when it strikes you the impact will be irresistible, and you will inevitably be swept back and back and back.

GOOD ADVICE. We have just had a death claim showing that the Equitable will lend a man money to keep his policy alive when his own resources fail.

I assured Mr. F. N. for $5,000 fourteen years ago, when he was in good financial condition, but five years ago he lost all his money, and would have surrendered his policy, had I not persuaded him to keep the assurance in force by obtaining a loan on his policy for that purpose, and now his heirs reap the benefit of the good advice and his wise action. 1. L. Register

HOW ABOUT THIS,

BOYS?

THE NUMBER OF YOUNG MEN OF EIGHTEEN,

NINETEEN AND TWENTY YEARS OF AGE WHO

ARE BEING REJECTED DAY AFTER DAY BY THE LIFE INSURANCE COMPANIES IS APPALLING.

WHAT IS MORE, THE BOYS AND GIRLS LACK THE STAMINA OF OLD DAYS. I KNOW, AS A SCHOOL COMMITTEEMAN, THAT THE SCHOLARS OF TO-DAY CANNOT DO THE HARD WORK OF

EVEN TEN YEARS AGO,

From a siatement made publicly in the State House, Boston, Mass., by Dr. W J. Gallivan, President of the Boston School Board.

ENTHUSIASTIC CHICAGO MEETING. A most enthusiastic meeting of the Equitable family was held at the Auditorium Hotel, Chicago, on November 21. The entire Chicago agency force were present, and in addition the following managers and general agents from other places: John C. Eisele, N. J. Dilday, H. J. Powell, George A. Parker, H. H. Hoyt, M. A. Marks, F. P. Chapin, H. D. Neely, L. D. Wilkes, John A. Brown, Harry May, S. G. Pattison, I. Countryman, M. E. Ericson, E. Eichelbergher, J. E. Durgin, J. S. Kendrick, S. D. Kitchens, W. A. Sanders and J. C. Stanton, Jr. From all accounts this must have been the most inspiring and enthusiastic meeting ever held in Chicago by representatives of this or any other company. The speeches were made by Messrs. Tarbell, Eisele, Hoyt, Wilkes, Marks, Dilday, Neely, Nelson and Dr. Wells. All the addresses were earnest, eloquent and enthusiastic, and all references to the new method of compensation were loudly applauded. The greatest enthusiasm prevailed throughout, and every one present was loud in praises of the Equitable—"the agents' company."

The enthusiasm created at this meeting can best be illustrated by an interesting incident which occurred in connection with it. On the day before the dinner one of the agents present had arranged for an appointment at twelve o'clock the following day with a client to take $3,000 of assurance on the Endowment plan. Being compelled to be absent from the office at the appointed time, he asked another agent, a friend of his, to kindly attend to the appointment for him and close the matter up. The friend was so enthused at the meeting that he thought he would try to go his friend one better, and succeeded in closing the matter for $5,000. When the first agent found what had been done, he felt that he would not be outdone by the other, so immediately called on the applicant and raised the amount to $10,000, annual premium $527, and closed it on a binding receipt.

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Count that day lost whose low descending

sun

The above appropriate little advertisement for Christmas time has been productive of many inquiries.

Views by thy hand no application won.

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Immense Enthusiasm Over the New Method of Compensation-Ring

ing Speeches by Managers. On October 31 a dinner was given at Sherry's by the Equitable to its Metropolitan agents. About 500 were present, including managers from all territories east of the Ohio, and the occasion was graced by the presence of many of the lady representatives of the Society. Mr. James W. Alexander presided, and was supported by all the officers of the Society, and some of its Directors. Speeches were made by Messrs. J. W. Alexander, J. H. Hyde, G. E. Tarbell and G. T. Wilson for the officers, and Mr. J. J. McCook spoke for the Directors.

The theme of Mr. Alexander's speech was the sentiment that always has and does exist amongst workers for the Equitable, and the esprit de corps which permeates everyone, from office boy up to President.

Mr. Hyde pledged anew his devotion to the company, to which his father had given his entire life work.

Mr. Tarbell created great enthusiasm by his eloquent and forceful speech on the possibilities of the business for the agent, his speech being constantly interrupted by enthusiastic applause and cheering.

Mr. Wilson made one of his happiest efforts, and was vociferously applauded for his remarks on the relation that should exist between the officer and agent.

As this was the first extensive meeting of agents since the new methods of compensation went into effect, it gives us much pleasure to give brief extracts from the speeches made by some of the prominent Managers and General Agents, showing how they view the Equitable's new method, now that they have tried it for awhile:

JOSEPH BOWES. “Never has there been a time in my mind in the history of the Equitable when there has been such an opportunity for getting agents as there is at present.

* I believe that under this new system of compensation we will surround ourselves with a class of agents that in the long run will be more efficient, more productive and of a character way above what other companies have in their employ to-day. That

is the class of men we want. We have been experimenting with this matter for ten months, and your experience may differ from mine, but I am here to give the new method of compensation my unqualified approval

This is an entirely unique experience to me, and one that fills me with hope, gentlemen, and I tell you candidly that if I thought the Equitable were to go back to the old system I would simply quit the business.”

ARCHIBALD C. HAYNES. "When I had the honor of standing upon the platform of the Waldorf on the occasion of the Fortieth Anniversary, and stating from the bottom of my heart, I meant it, that indeed I was happy that I had been permitted to live to see the day when the administration of the Equitable had the grand and magnificent nerve to face the high commission, the greatest curse to the agent that had ever beset the business life of any man in any business—the abnormal commission, carrying in its wake all those terrible evils from which we suffered. I say that I meant what I said—that I was happy that I had lived to see that day, and if I was happy then, how much happier do you suppose I am to-night? Under the old system, the agent's brokerage went up until all the value of any business put on the books had to be capitalized and paid for to the sub-agent on every piece of work. When he finished his work he had all he could ever get on that piece of work. Under the present system, we are not only getting something to pay for our expenses to-day and this week, but on every piece of work we are able to save something for our old age, and the man who buys it cannot get it away from usthat is what the new method of compensation means. It is a move in the interests of the agents,

and I want personally to say to Mr. Alexander and his associate officers that I hope it will be written in letters of red that one of the greatest things that has ever been done for the agent, for the field man, has been inaugurated under this administration of Mr. James W. Alexander."

EDWARD A. WOODS. “I express sincerely and from the bottom of my heart my great obligations to the

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officers of the Society for introducing this year the present commission scheme, which is working so admirably in my agency. October, last year, was, with one cxception, the largest October we had ever had, and I received a telegram from my office to-night saying that the business to-day is over $140,000, $760,000 for the month, and a gain of $80,000 over the same month last year. I only mention this to show that besides having made already a gain of one million dollars over the very large business for the same period of last year, and besides getting a business of a higher character, it has rather increased than diminished, both in number of agents secured and amount of business written. This, in my opinion, is the most practical statement I can make as to the working of the new scheme, and the way in which it is regarded by me and my agency.”

"Much Too Stout"

The corpulent gentleman was severely lectured 3 by a life insurance agent.

A rather stout gentleman recently applied for a life insurance policy, which was refused on the ground that he was not a “good risk.”

“The trouble," said the insurance man, “is that you are not careful about what you eat; you are 'much too stout.

R. J. MIX.

"We like the Equitable. We like its Officers, its policyholders, its agency contract-and right here, gentlemen, I want to indorse every word that has been said by these Equitable managers to-night regarding the new system of compensating agents. I liked it the first time I saw it, and I do not believe that there is anything good to be had in the way of an agent or in the way of new business which cannot be secured under that splendid contract. The best assurance experience in the country has been calling for years for just such a proposition, and I say three cheers and a long life for the new contract."

The above is taken from the current number of What to Eat.Who did it? Go easy, boys! Don't lecture them too severely Shows how the world moves, tho'. The prospect used to do all the kicking-now the agent does it all—and “severely lectures the corpulent gentleman.” So mote it be!

JOHN C. EISELE.

“My partner and myself led the list, you will notice, for the month of September, and we propose to write and pay for personally this year more than a million dollars of paid business.

I want to tell you to-night that so far as our agency is concerned, you will hear from us before the close of November; and, Brother Woods, I congratulate you and the Woods family and the little acorns that have now grown into spreading oaks, but you will have all you can do to look after your laurels if you expect to lead in November.”

GOOD WORK. Mr. James B. Niver was in this office a few days ago, and showed us an application from a prominent Boston business man, and also a check for the first year's premium, $8,189.50. He had already placed two policies on this gentleman's life, one with a premium of $7,887.50, and the other with a premium of $1,376. Mr. Niver had also recently assured the applicant's brother for a policy with a premium of $7,194, so that these two brothers now pay in premiums every year $24,647. All these policies are Gold Debentures on the Endowment plan, and Mr. Niver says he hopes to assure each of these gentlemen for the Society's full limit before very long. May he be successful.

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