Page images
PDF
EPUB

REPORT

OF THE

TWENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL MEETING

OF THE

American Bar Association

HELD AT

DENVER, COLORADO,

August 21, 22 and 23, 1901.

PHILADELPHIA:
DANDO PRINTING AND PUBLISHING COMPANY,
34, SOUTH THIRD STREET.

TTLAND STANFORD, JR., UVVERSITY

LÁN DEPARTMENT.

THE

TWENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL MEETING

WILL BE HELD AT

SARATOGA SPRINGS, NEW YORK,

On Wednesday, Thursday and Friday,

August 27, 28 and 29, 1902.

LIBRARY
Leland Stavford, Jr.
UNIVERSITY
a 564 62

TRANSACTIONS

OF THE

TWENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL MEETING

OF THE

American Bar Association,

HELD AT

DENVER, COLORADO, .

AUGUST 21, 22 AND 23, 1901.

Wednesday, August 21, 1901. The Twenty-fourth Annual Meeting of the American Bar Association convened in the Tabor Grand Opera House, Denver, Colorado, on Wednesday, August 21, 1901, ať 10.30 A. M.

The meeting was called to order by Charles F. Manderson, of Nebraska. Charles F. Manderson, of Nebraska :

Gentlemen of the American Bar Association, I congratulate you that under such pleasant auspices you have met in this beautiful city of the mountain and the plain. It is my pleasure, as I know it will be yours to have me introduce the President for the year 1901, Mr. Edmund Wetmore, of New York.

The President:

Gentlemen, I thank you for your kindly greeting, and my distinguished predecessor for his gracious introduction.

Before proceeding with the annual address, the Colorado State Bar Association, represented by Mr. Platt Rogers, and

at

the Denver City Bar Association, represented by Mr. Hugh Butler, are here to welcome us.

Platt Rogers, of Colorado :

Mr. President and gentlemen of the American Bar Association, it greatly pleases the members of the Colorado Bar Association to behold the members of the American Bar Association at last assembled in the city of Denver. I say last, because it has seemed to us that you should have come long before. However, I suppose it is but another instance of the law's delay.

Of course, you have all come properly armed. It is not necessary that you should be completely equipped as formerly. Mr. Roosevelt has been here several times. He tackled all the varmints in the western part of the state, but omitted the tiger in Denver, thereby indicating that the strenuous life is not without its element of political caution.

While you are here we expect you to have a good time, a royal good time, but let me caution you, if you should discover any tendency to dizziness or uncertainty in your movements, not to charge it to the altitude or the thinness of the atmosphere. That sort of a story may go in the east, but out here we know that the thinness is not in the atmosphere. If

your social gatherings should chance to break up late at night, and you should discover at the street corners the unusual spectacle of two arc lights, do not be frightened; they are both there. It is merely a way we have of spending our surplus money. One contract for electric light is usually enough for a town, but we can stand two. You are not to take this observation as an explanation of all cases in which you may see double. On the contrary, the rule obtains here, as well as in the east, that if upon leaving the club in the early morning you discover two carriages awaiting you, you will take the first one; the second isn't there.

Again, I assure you that you are welcome, but I must add that while we are prepared to welcome the coming, we are equally prepared to speed the parting guests. We have our full complement of attorneys in this state already, and any considerable addition from members of the American Bar Associ. ation would completely demoralize the industry. Besides, you who have climbed to the twenty-eighth story in the practice of the profession would very soon render us unable to attend even a local bar meeting.

Whatever you see while here that strikes your fancy is yours—when paid for—and we trust that if you are not able to buy a mine, which we understand some of the members of the Colorado Bar Association might be able to sell you if you insist, you will at least carry away with you the recollection of the most instructive and agreeable meeting of the American Bar Association that

you

have ever attended. Hugh Butler, of Colorado :

Mr. President and gentlemen of the American Bar Association: It was my purpose to deliver a written address of wel

I understood that my distinguished friend and predecessor, who has just addressed you, had prepared a long oration. In order to compete with him I came with a manuscript of equal length, as I supposed. I find, however, much to my gratification, that he has satisfied himself with a brief address, eloquent, appropriate and fitting, and I therefore simply say, without any other address, that the Denver Bar Association joins in a cordial welcome to the American Bar Association.

It is difficult to make a speech of welcome unless one indulges more or less in self-glorification. I might speak of these grand and massive mountains, I might speak of our very many natural attractions, and I might speak of our beautiful and magnificent city of Denver, but, in my judgment, it is better to let the handiwork of nature and the handiwork of man speak in their own eloquent way, contenting ourselves with a simple but sincere welcome to our visitors from the North, the East, the West and the South who on this occasion constitute the American Bar Association.

come.

« PreviousContinue »