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DEMETER AND PERSEPHONE OWD ROÄ.

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To send the noon into the night an Their rich ambrosia tasted aconite.

break The man, that only lives and loves an

The sunless halls of Hades into Heaven
hour,
Seem'd nobler than their hard Eternities. Till thy dark lord accept and love to

Sun,
And all the Shadow die into the Light,

When thou shalt dwell the whole brigh
To send my life thro' olive-yard and year with me,
vine

And souls of men, who grew beyon

their race,

And made themselves as Gods agains Rain-rotten died the wheat, the barley- the fear spears

Of Death and Hell; and thou that has Were hollow-husk'd, the leaf fell, and

from men, As Queen of Death, that worship which

is Fear, time

Henceforth, as having risen from out the Sickening, and Ætna kept her winter dead,

Shalt ever send thy life along with mine Then He, the brother of this Darkness, From buried grain thro' springing blade, He

and bless Who still is highest, glancing from his Their garner'd Autumn also, reap with

height
On earth a fruitless fallow, when he Earth-mother, in the harvest hymns of
miss'd

Earth
The wonted steam of sacrifice, the praise The worship which is Love, and see no
And prayer of men, decreed that thou

should'st dwell
For nine white moons of each whole year

The Stone, the Wheel, the dimly

glimmering lawns Three dark ones in the shadow with thy of torment, and the shadowy warrior

Of that Elysium, all the hateful fires

glide Once more the reaper in the gleam of

Along the silent field of Asphodel. dawn

0WD ROA 1

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Will see me by the landmark far away,
Blessing his field, or seated in the dusk
Rejoicing in the harvest and the grange

. Naär, noä mander 2 o' use to be callin

'im Roä, Roä, Roä,
Yet I, Earth-Goddess, am but ill-

Fur the dog's stoän-deäf, an' e's blind, 'e
With them, who still are highest. Those

can naither stan' nor goä.
gray heads,
What meant they by their Fate beyond

But I means fur to maäke 'is owd aäge
the Fates

as 'appy as iver I can, But younger kindlier Gods to bear us

Fur I owäs owd Roäver moor nor I iver down,

owäd mottal man.
As we bore down the Gods before us? Thou's rode of 'is back when a babby,

Gods,
lo quench, not hurl the thunderbolt, to

afoor thou was gotten too owd,
stay,

Fur 'e'd fetch an' carry like owt, 'e was
spread the plague, the famine; Gods

allus as good as gowd.
1 Old Rover. : Manner.

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The Stone, the Wheel, the dimly

glimmering lawns Of that Elysium, all the hateful fires Of torment, and the shadowy warrior

glide Along the silent field of Asphodel.

OWD ROA1

Naży, noä mander 2 o' use to be callin'

'im Roä, Roä, Roä, Fur the dog's stoän-deäf, an' e's blind, 'e

can naither stan' nor goä.

Once more the reaper in the gleam of

dawn Ty Vill see me by the landmark far away,

Blessing his field, or seated in the dusk of even, by the lonely threshing-floor, Lejoicing in the harvest and the grange. Yet I, Earth-Goddess, am but ill

content Vith them, who still are highest. Those

gray heads, Vhat meant they by their • Fate beyond

the Fates' ut younger kindlier Gods to bear us

down, S we bore down the Gods before us?

Gods, quench, not hurl the thunderbolt, to

stay, ot spread the plague, the famine; Gods

indeed,

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But I means sur to maäke 'is owd aäge

as 'appy as iver I can, Fur I owäs owd Roäver moor nor I iver

owäd mottal man.

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Thou's rode of 'is back when a babby,

afoor thou was gotten too owd, Fur 'e'd fetch an' carry like owt, 'e was

allus as good as gowd.

1 Old Rover

2 Manner.

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Eh, but 'e'd fight wi' a will when 'e

fowt; 'e could howd I 'is oan, An' Roä was the dog as knaw'd when

an’ wheere to bury his boane. An' 'e kep’ his head hoop like a king, an'

'e'd niver not down wi' 'is taäil, Fur 'e'd niver done nowt to be shaämed

on, when we was i' Howlaby Daäle.

An' 'e sarved me sa well when 'e lived,

that, Dick, when 'e cooms to be

dead, I thinks as I'd like fur to hev soom soort

of a sarvice reäd.

Fur 'e's moor good sense na the Parlia

ment man 'at stans fur us 'ere, An' I'd voät fur 'im, my oän sen, if 'e

could but stan' fur the Shere.

• Faäithful an'True' - them words be i'

Scriptur - an' Faäithful an' True 'Ull be fun?? upo' four short legs ten times

fur one upo' two. An' maäybe they'll walk upo' two but I

knaws they runs upo' four,3 — Bedtime, Dicky! but waäit till tha 'eärs

it be strikin' the hour. Fur I wants to tell tha o' Roä when we

lived i’ Howlaby Daäle, Ten year sin’- Naäy-naäy ! tha mun

nobbut hev' one glass of aäle. Straänge an' owd-farran'd' the 'ouse, an'

belt long afoor my daäy Wi' haäfe o' the chimleys a-twizzen'd 6

an'twined like a band o' haäy. The fellers as maäkes them picturs, 'ud

coom at the fall o' the year, An' sattle their ends upo' stools to pictur

An' theere i' the 'ouse one night

it's down, an' all on it now Goän into mangles an' tonups, o

raäved slick thruf by the plorTheere, when the 'ouse wur a house, I'

night I wur sittin' aloän, Wi' Roäver athurt my feeät, an' slees

still as a stoän, Of a Christmas Eäve, an' as cord 2

this, an' the midders ? as white An' the fences all on 'em bolster'da

wi' the windle 3 that night; An' the cat wur a-sleeäpin alongs.*

Roäver, but I wur awaäke, An' smoäkin' an' thinkin' o' things

Doänt maäke thysen sick w E.

caike. Fur the men ater supper 'ed sung the

songs an' 'ed 'ed their beer, An' 'ed goän their waäys; ther was a

but three, an' noän on 'em there They was all on 'em fear'd o’the Ghis

an' dussn't not sleeäp i' the But Dicky, the Ghoäst moästlinst a

nobbut a rat or a mouse. An' I looökt out wonst 5 at the aizt:

an' the daäle was all of a thar, Fur I seed the beck coomin' down listi

long black snaäke i' the snaw, An' I heard greät heaps o' the sky

slushin' down fro' the bank to the

beck, An' then as I stood i' the doorwair, 1

feeäld it drip o' my neck. Saw I turn'd in ageän, and I tho#: /'

the good owd times 'at was gid An' the munney they maäde by the

an' the times 'at was coomin .

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Fur I thowt if the Staäte was a-gari

to let in furriners' wheät, Howiver was British farmers to see

ageän o' their feeät.

1 Mangolds and turnips. 2 Meadows.

» Drifted snow 4'Moästlins,' for the most part, generally

the door-poorch theere, An'the Heagle 'as hed two heads stannin'

theere o' the brokken stick; An' they niver 'ed seed sich ivin'8 as

graw'd hall ower the brick; 1 Hold. 2 Found. 3 'Ou'as in house.' 4*Owd-farran'd,' old-fashioned. 5 Built. 6* Twizzen'd,' twisted. ? On a staff ragulé.

8 Ivy.

5 Once.

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An' I slep' i' my chair ageän wil my

hairm hingin' down to the floor, An' I thowt it was Roäver a-tuggin' an'

An' I claums an' I mashes the winder

hin, when I gits to the top, But the heat druv hout i' my heyes till I

feäld mysen ready to drop. 1 The girl was as dirty a slut as ever trudged in the mud, but there is a sense of slatternliness in traäpes'd' which is not expressed in trudged.'

? She half overturned me and shrieked like an owl gone mad.

teärin' me wuss nor afoor,

3 Ladder. A thoroughly insignificant or worthless person

1 Peel.

· Arm.

3 Mad.

4 Latch.

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But I browt 'im down, an’ we got to the

Raving politics, never at rest — as the

poor earth's pale history runs – What is it all but a trouble of ants in the

gleam of a million million of suns? 1 Beams.

2 Wrapt ourselves 3 The beam that runs along the roon of house just beneath the ridge.

barn, fur the barn wouldn't burn Wi' the wind blawin' hard tother waäy,

an' the wind wasn't like to turn.

1 Mark.

2 Clutched. 3* Bubbling,' a young unfledged bird.

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