History of the Origin, Formation, and Adoption of the Constitution of the United States: With Notices of Its Principal Framers, Volume 1

Front Cover
Harper and Brothers, 1861 - 669 pages
 

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Contents

Cession of Lands by South Carolina
301
Descent and Education
305
Political Difficulties in the Management of this Territory
308
The United States insist on the Right to navigate the Mississippi
314
Washingtons Anxieties
315
Their Complaints of Congress
320
DECAY AND FAILURE OF THE CONFEDERATION PROGRESS OF OPINION
328
Important Centres of Opinion
334
Action of Virginia
340
The Revenue System again rejected by the New York Legislature
346
Objections to it in Congress 352355
352
It impels Congress to Action
358
Importance of the Sanction of the Old Government in the Formation
364
Washingtons Opinions 370
370
CHAPTER IV
380
Qualities of the Framers of the Constitution
387
The New Government established without Violence
393
Appointed to the Federal Convention
397
Receives Official Notice of his Appointment to the Convention
399
The Idea of a Monarchical Government entertained to some Extent
402
His Birth and Education
408
CHAPTER IX
420
Appointed one of the Commissioners to Annapolis
427
VOL I
433
Action of New York
440
Inability of the Confederation to manage Foreign Commerce
446
Final Appeal by Congress for the Establishment of the Revenue
448
CHARLES COTESWORTH PINCKNEY
454
His Course on the SlaveTrade and the Regulation of Commerce
456
CHAPTER XIV
462
CHAPTER XV
480
CHAPTER XVI
486
Representation of New Jersey on the Articles of Confederation
493
Act to authorize the Delegates of the Delaware State to ratify
500
Report of the Committee of Congress as to the Proceedings of
506
Mernbers of the Convention which formed the Constitution
516

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Page 500 - The United States, in Congress assembled, shall have authority to appoint a committee, to sit in the recess of Congress, to be denominated " A Committee of the States," and to consist of one delegate from each state, and to appoint such other committees and civil officers as may be necessary for managing the general affairs of the United States under their direction; to appoint one of their number to preside; provided that no person be allowed...
Page 496 - The better to secure and perpetuate mutual friendship and intercourse among the people of the different States in this Union, the free inhabitants of each of these States, paupers, vagabonds, and fugitives from justice excepted, shall be entitled to all privileges and immunities of free citizens in the several States; and the people of each State shall have free ingress and regress to and from any other State, and shall enjoy therein all the privileges of trade and commerce, subject to the same duties,...
Page 498 - ... of establishing rules for deciding in all cases what captures on land or water shall be legal, and in what manner prizes taken by land or naval forces, in the service of the United States, shall be divided or appropriated...
Page 500 - States, and exacting such postage on the papers passing through the same as may be requisite to defray the expenses of the said office — appointing all officers of the land forces in the service of the United States, excepting regimental officers — appointing all the officers of the naval forces, and commissioning all officers whatever in the service of the United States...
Page 252 - The said states hereby severally enter into a firm league of friendship with each other for their common defence, the security of their liberties, and their mutual and general welfare, binding themselves to assist each other against all force offered to, or attacks made upon them, or any of them, on account of religion, sovereignty, trade, or any other pretence whatever.
Page 499 - ... take an oath, to be administered by one of the judges of the supreme or superior court of the state, where the cause shall be tried, 'well and truly to hear and determine the matter in question, according to the best of his judgment, without favor, affection, or hope of reward :' provided, also, that no state shall be deprived of territory for the benefit of the United States.
Page 499 - The United States, in Congress assembled, shall also have the sole and exclusive right and power of regulating the alloy and value of coin struck by their own authority, or by that of the respective States; fixing the standard of weights and measures throughout the United States; regulating the trade and managing all affairs with the Indians, not members of any of the States; provided that the legislative right of any State within its own limits be not infringed or violated...
Page 348 - That, in the opinion of Congress, it is expedient that, on the second Monday in May next, a convention of delegates who shall have been appointed by the several states, be held at Philadelphia, for the sole and express purpose of revising the articles of confederation, and reporting to Congress, and the several legislatures, such...
Page 294 - And whenever any of the said States shall have sixty thousand free inhabitants therein such State shall be admitted by its delegates into the Congress of the United States on an equal footing with the original states in all respects whatever, and shall be at liberty to form a permanent constitution and State government.
Page 438 - And, in the just preservation of rights and property, it is understood and declared that no law ought ever to be made or have force in the said Territory that shall, in any manner whatever, interfere with or affect private contracts, or engagements, bona fide, and without fraud previously formed.

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