Hegel and Hegelianism

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T. & T. Clark, 1903 - 301 pages

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Page 8 - FLOWER in the crannied wall, I pluck you out of the crannies, I hold you here, root and all, in my hand, Little flower — but if I could understand What you are, root and all, and all in all, I should know what God and man is.
Page 266 - ... Idea ; but what we are concerned to show is rather that the Idea becomes for them certain, ie, this Idea, namely the unity of divine and human nature, attains the stage of certainty, that, so far as they are concerned, it receives the form of immediate sense-perception, of outward existence — in short, that this Idea appears as seen and experienced in the world. This unity must accordingly show itself to consciousness in a purely temporal, absolutely ordinary manifestation of reality, in one...
Page 24 - For, an ye heard a music, like enow They are building still, seeing the city is built To music, therefore never built at all, And therefore built for ever.
Page 19 - You are our dear Mrs. Doasyouwouldbedoneby." "No, you are good Mrs. Bedonebyasyoudid; but you are grown quite beautiful now!" "To you," said the fairy. "But look again." "You are Mother Carey," said Tom, in a very low, solemn voice; for he had found out something which made him very happy, and yet frightened him more than all that he had ever seen. "But you are grown quite young again." "To you,
Page 13 - God might have made the earth bring forth Enough for great and small, The oak tree and the cedar tree, Without a flower at all.
Page 19 - They looked — and both of them cried out at once, "Oh, who are you, after all?" "You are our dear Mrs. Doasyouwouldbedoneby." "No, you are good Mrs. Bedonebyasyoudid; but you are grown quite beautiful now!" "To you," said the fairy. "But look again.
Page 173 - ... the sun, still blazing; some rotting, like the earth; others, like the moon, stable in desolation. All of these we take to be made of something we call matter: a thing which no analysis can help us to conceive; to whose incredible properties no familiarity can reconcile our minds.
Page 265 - If Man is to get a consciousness of the unity of divine and human nature, and of this characteristic of Man as belonging to Man in general; or if this knowledge is to force its way wholly into the consciousness of his...
Page 291 - Thou shalt remain, in midst of other woe Than ours, a friend to man, to whom thou say'st, "Beauty is truth, truth beauty,"—that is all Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know.

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