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" though not verbally Latin, yet it is the outcome of the Latin grammatical doctrine that the verb to be takes the same case after it as before it. This is a plain instance of the invasion of idiom by grammar. "
State Normal Monthly - Page 26
by Kansas State Teachers College of Emporia - 1897
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The Principles of Language Exemplified in a Practical English Grammar: With ...

George Crane - 1843 - 264 pages
...minister," "fortress," which, before the ellipsis, were in the nominative case (for the pupil will recollect that the verb to be takes the same case after it as before it, and here the relative is its subject or nominative), after the omission of the relative will be in...
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An abridgment of the pupil teacher's English grammar and etymology

English grammar - 1848
...precedes the participle the preposition ' of follows it. Example—The love of learning. Rule V.—The verb TO BE takes the same case after it, as before it. Example—This is he; I am the person ; I believed him to be a rogue. The reason of this is that the...
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Companion to English Grammar ...

Jacob Lowres - 1862
...war is ended.' Observe also that in sentences like (c) you cannot supply the conjunction that. Since the verb ' to be' takes the same case after it as before it, the noun error in sentence (e) is nominative after is, agreeing in case with the nominative if. In...
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The English language: its grammar and history. Together with a treatise on ...

Henry Lewis (M.A.) - 1869
...instance. It would be preferable to acknowledge a Vocative Case. In construction the syntactical rule is, that the verb to be takes the same case after it as before it. I am Tie. It is I. He is not the man I intended. The POSSESSIVE CASE is tliat form of the substantive...
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The comprehensive home lesson book. [With] Key to arithmetical ..., Part 6

William Gardner (headmaster of St. Crysostom's sch, Liverpool.) - 1871
...per-ti-na'-cious, holding to one's opinions. comprise. LEARN AND WRITE— GRAMMAR. RULE XII.—The verb to be takes the same case after it as before it; as, It is I. Thou art the man. It and / are nominatives to the verb is. Thou and man are nominatives...
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The class and home-lesson book of English grammar

Charles Henry W. Biggs - 1871 - 72 pages
...love. They love. 270.—Transitive verbs govern an. objective case— He broke the window. 271.—The verb to be takes the same case after it as before it— (used transitively); have, hear, let, (used transitively); make, must, need, (used as an auxiliary)...
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The English language: its grammar and history. With examination papers

Henry Lewis (M.A.) - 1872 - 199 pages
...instance. It would be preferable to acknowledge a Vocative Case. In construction the syntactical rule is, that the verb to be takes the same case after it as before it. I am he. It is I. He is not the man I intended. The POSSESSIVE CASE is that form of the substantive...
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An easy introduction to Latin prose composition

Arthur Marwood Wilcox - 1877 - 12 pages
...Therefore " to have been" is fuisse. 46. A most important Eule, both in English and in Latin, is this :—that the Verb " to be " takes the same case after it as before it. Thus, we say, " Who is he"? not " Who is him " ? "I am she," not " I am her " ; " He supposed them...
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Easy lessons in English grammar

Lionel Edwardes - 1877 - 120 pages
...and referring to the same person or thing, agree in case. This is called the Rule of Apposition. (2.) The Verb To be takes the same case after it as before it. (3.) The Verbs To become, To seem, To appear, and Passive Verbs of culling, naming, appointing, considering,...
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The difficulties of English grammar and analysis simplified; with a brief ...

W J. Dickinson - 1878 - 141 pages
...he nor they are satisfied." " Either you or he is mistaken." (For above, see Adams, 587-600.) (2) The Verb to be takes the same case after it as before it, eg,— "I am a man." I is nominative to am; man nominative after am. All Copulative Verbs are followed...
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