The Harvard Graduates' Magazine

Front Cover
Harvard Graduates' Magazine Association, 1896
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 76 - What th' unsearchable dispose Of highest wisdom brings about, And ever best found in the close. Oft he seems to hide his face, But unexpectedly returns. And to his faithful champion hath in place Bore witness gloriously ; whence Gaza mourns And all that band them to resist His uncontrollable intent; His servants he with new acquist Of true experience from this great event With peace and consolation hath dismissed. And calm of mind all passion spent.
Page 74 - Much have I seen and known ; cities of men And manners, climates, councils, governments, Myself not least, but honour'd of them all; And drunk delight of battle with my peers, Far on the ringing plains of windy Troy. I am a part of all that I have met; Yet all experience is an arch wherethro' Gleams that untravell'd world, whose margin fades For ever and for ever when I move.
Page 392 - And if I give thee honour due, Mirth, admit me of thy crew, To live with her and live with thee, In unreproved pleasures free...
Page 96 - I give unto you power to tread on serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy ; and nothing shall by any means hurt you. Notwithstanding, in this rejoice not that the spirits are subject unto you ; but rather rejoice, because your names are written in heaven.
Page 532 - Farewell ! be thy destinies onward and bright ! To thy children the lesson still give, With freedom to think, and with patience to bear, And for Right ever bravely to live. Let not moss-covered Error moor thee at its side, As the world on Truth's current glides by ; Be the herald of light, and the bearer of Love, Till the stock of the Puritans die.
Page 180 - For my own part, I believe that the struggle for life is the order of the world, at which it is vain to repine. I can imagine the burden changed in the way in which it is to be borne, but I cannot imagine that it ever will be lifted from men's backs.
Page 48 - The past gives us our vocabulary and fixes the limits of our imagination; we cannot get away from it. There is, too, a peculiar logical pleasure in making manifest the continuity between what we are doing and what has been done before. But the present has a right to govern itself so far as it can; and it ought always to be remembered that historic continuity with the past is not a duty, it is only a necessity.
Page 183 - Clear singing, clean slicing ; Sweet spoken, soft finishing ; Making death beautiful, Life but a coin To be staked in the pastime Whose playing is more Than the transfer of being ; Arch-anarch, chief builder, Prince and evangelist, I am the Will of God : I am the Sword.
Page 181 - I do not doubt, that no man who lives in the same world with most of us can doubt, and that is, that the faith is true and adorable which leads a soldier to throw away his life in obedience to a blindly accepted duty, in a cause which he little understands, in a plan of campaign of which he has no notion, under tactics of which he does not see the use.
Page 186 - And when the wind in the tree-tops roared, The soldier asked from the deep dark grave: 'Did the banner flutter then?' 'Not so, my hero,' the wind replied, "The fight is done, but the banner won, Thy comrades of old have borne it hence, Have borne it in triumph hence.' Then the soldier spake from the deep dark grave: 'I am content.

Bibliographic information