Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" Our policy in regard to Europe, which was adopted at an early stage of the wars which have so long agitated that quarter of the globe, nevertheless remains the same, which is, not to interfere in the internal concerns of any of its powers; to consider... "
The Monroe Doctrine, an Obsolete Shibboleth - Page 111
by Hiram Bingham - 1913 - 151 pages
Full view - About this book

Journal: 1st-13th Congress . Repr. 14th Congress, 1st Session ..., Volume 1

United States. Congress. House - 1823
...have interposed, by force, in the internal concerns of Spain. To what extent such interposition way be carried, on the same principle, is a question,...submitting to injuries from none. But, in regard to these continents, circumstances are eminently and conspicuously different. It is impossible that the...
Full view - About this book

A National Calendar ..., Volume 5

Peter Force - 1824
...legitimate government for us ; to cultivate friendly relations with it, and to preserve those relation? by a frank, firm, and manly policy, meeting in all...power ; submitting to injuries from none. But, in regfird to these continents, circumstances are eminently and conspicuously different. It is impossible...
Full view - About this book

cobbett's weekly register volume xlix

Cobbett's Weekly Register Volume XLIX From January to March,1824 - 1824
...Government for us; to cultivate friendly relatfons with it, and to preserve those relations, by a frank, Qrm and manly policy, meeting, in all instances, the just claims of every power ; submitting to injuries froin none — But, in regard to- those Continents* cucujnstances are eminently and conspicuously different....
Full view - About this book

The Christian observer [afterw.] The Christian observer and advocate

1825
...a« the legitimate government for us ; tocnltivate friendly relations with it, and In preserve tltose relations by a frank, firm, and manly policy; meeting,...instances, the just claims of every power; submitting te injnries front none. But, in regard to these continent«, circumstances nre eminently and conspicuously...
Full view - About this book

Historical Sketches of the United States: From the Peace of 1815 to 1830

Samuel Perkins - 1830 - 444 pages
...and surely none more so than the United States. Our policy in regard to Europe, which was adopted in an early stage of the wars which have so long agitated...in all instances, the just claims of every power, and submitting to injuries from none. But in regard to this continent, circumstances are eminently...
Full view - About this book

Historical Sketches of the United States: From the Peace of 1815 to 1830

Samuel Perkins - 1830 - 444 pages
...is, not to interfere in the internal concerns of any of its powers ; to consider the government do facto, as the legitimate government for us ; to cultivate...in all instances, the just claims of every power, and submitting to injuries from none. But in regard to this continent, circumstances are eminently...
Full view - About this book

A History of the United States of America: From the Discovery of the ...

Charles Augustus Goodrich - 1833 - 540 pages
...proof can be adduced, than that the allied powers should have thought it proper, on any principles satisfactory to themselves, to have interposed, by...submitting to injuries from none. But, in regard to these continents, circumstances are eminently and conspicuously different. It is impossible that the...
Full view - About this book

A History of the United States of America: From the Discovery of the ...

Charles Augustus Goodrich - 1833 - 540 pages
...are interested ; even those most remote, and surely none more so than the United States. Our.,policy, in regard to Europe, which was adopted at an early...submitting to injuries from none. But, in regard to these continents, circumstances are eminently and conspicuously different. It is impossible that the...
Full view - About this book

Elements of International Law: With a Sketch of the History of the Science

Henry Wheaton - 1836 - 375 pages
...the European powers ; to consider the government, de facto, as the legitimate government for them ; to cultivate friendly relations with it, and to preserve...every power — submitting to injuries from none. But with regard to the American continents, circumstances were widely different. It was impossible that...
Full view - About this book

Elements of International Law, Volume 2

Henry Wheaton - 1836 - 655 pages
...for them ; to cultivate friendly relations with it, and to preserve those relations by a frank, Grin, and manly policy ; meeting in all instances the just...every power — submitting to injuries from none. But with regard to the American continents, circumstances were widely different. It was impossible that...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF